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NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE RECORD 




North 
Carolina 

State 
College 




of the University of North Carolina 



Catalog Issue 
1961-1962 



Announcements for Sessions 1961-1962 



'ublished monthly by the North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
ind Engineering. State College Station entered as second-class matter 
October 16, 1917, at the post office at Raleigh, N. C. Under the act 
>f August 24, 1912. 



'OLUME 60 



NUMBER 7 



MARCH, 1961 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND ENGINEERING • ESTABLISHED 1887 



CONTENTS 

Page 

College Map 4 

Officers of Administration 6 

Calendar 8 

General Information 11 

Heritage 13 

Services and Divisions 14 

Campus 14 

Admission Req uirements 15 

Grades and Scholarships 18 

General Policies 20 

Residence 21 

Tuition and Fees 22 

Student Activities and Services 25 

School of Agriculture 33 

North Carolina Agricultural Institute 74 

Agricultural Experiment Station 75 

Agricultural Extension Work 76 

School of Design 79 

School of Education 89 

School of Engineering 105 

School of Forestry 141 

School of General Studies 153 

School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 161 

School of Textiles 171 

Graduate School 186 

College Extension Division 186 

Military Training 188 

Description of Courses 193 

Administration and Faculty 319 

Alumni Association 321 

College Foundations 321 

College Publications 322 

Summary of Enrollment 323 

Board of Trustees 323 

Teaching and Research Faculty 327 

Faculty Emeriti 352 

Special Staff 354 




I MOLLADAY 
£ ALUMNI 
J PRIMRCSE 
4.PULLEN 

I PEELE 

6. WATAUGA 
T BROOKS 
a FOURTH 
ft •OLD 
10 WELCH 

II BAGWELL 
& BERRY 
I3.BECT0N 
Ml CLARK 

HFRANK THOMPSON GYMNASIUM 

K.SYHE 

17 FIELD HOUSE 

19 KINO 
2CLEAZAR 
a ENGINEERIN6 
22 TOMPKINS 
21 WINSTON 
2* CERAMICS 
23. PAGE 

26 PARK SHOPS 

27 MORRIS 
26. LAUNDRY 

2S POWER PLANT 



3d RIDDICK 
31 DANIELS 

32. MANN 

33. WITHERS 

34 1911 BUILDING 

35 RICKS 
36. PATTERSON 

37 BURLINGTON NUCLEAR LABS 
3d W1LUASI NEAL REYNOLDS COL 
3ft PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

41. ALEXANDER 

42. STUOENT SUPPLY STORE 
43 BUREAU of MINES 

44. BROUGHTON 

46. POLK 

46. HARRELSON 

47 0. H. HILL LIBRARY 

46 C0LLE6E UNION 



SCOTT 

GARDNER 

WILLIAMS 

AGRONOMY GREENHOUSES 

LABORATORY BUILDING 

OWEN 

TURLINGTON 

TUCKER 

CAFETERIA 

KILGORE 

NELSON 

MAN GUM 

PRINT SHOP 

BRAGAW 

BRANDON P HODGES 

ROBERTSON 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

ANIMAL DIAG. LABORATORY 

0. R. C 

WUNC-TV 

MARRIED STUDENT HOUSING 



NORTH 



CAROLINA STATE 
I960 



COLLEGE 



THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

(General Administrative Officers at Chapel Hill) 

BY ACT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1931 THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT CHAPEL HILL, THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE FOR WOMEN AT GREENSBORO, AND 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING AT 
RALEIGH WERE CONSOLIDATED INTO THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

The administrative officers of The University of North Carolina are: 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Vice President and Finance Officer (Position Vacant) 

Donald Benton Anderson, B.A., B.Sc. Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research 

Alexander Hurlbutt Shepard, Jr., A.B., M.A., Business Officer and Treasurer 

The Vice President and Finance Officer has general administrative responsibilities and 
is specifically concerned with the development programs of the University, the presenta- 
tion of University budget requests to the several agencies of state government, the 
Escheats Fund, and relationships with national foundations and agencies of the federal 
government. 

The Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research, working with the University 
Graduate Executive Council and the three Deans of the Graduate School, has the respon- 
sibility for the coordination of the graduate offerings and research programs of the 
University. 

The Business Officer and Treasurer has the responsibility of over-all supervision of the 
preparation of the University budget requests and the expenditure of authorized budgets. 
This officer is also responsible for the administration within the University of those enact- 
ments of the General Assemblies that relate to the classification of personnel under the 
Stote Personnel Act. 

Each of these officers and the Chancellors of the component institutions are responsible 
to the President as the principal executive officer of the University of North Carolina. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND ENGINEERING 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

CHANCELLOR John Tyler Caldwell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
"A" Holladay Hall 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS John W. Shirley, B.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, 
110 Holladay Hall 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE H. Brooks James, Dean, 115 Patterson Hall 

E. W. Glazener, Director of Instruction, 1 1 1 Patterson Hall 

R. L. Lovvorn, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
105 Patterson Hall 

Charles W. Williams, Administrative Officer, 101-B Patter- 
son Hall 

D. S. Weaver, Director, Agricultural Extension Service, 104 
Ricks Hall 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN H. L. Kamphoefner, Dean, 200 Brooks Hall 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION J. B. Kirkland, Dean, 119 Tompkins Hall 

6 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING J. H. Lampe, Dean, 229 Riddick Building 

R. G. Carson, Jr., Director of Instruction, 232 Riddick 

Building 
N. W. Conner, Director, Engineering Research, 124 Riddick 
Building 

W. C. Bell, Director, Industrial Experimental Program, 
Old Ceramic Building 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY R. J. Preston, Dean, 162 Kilgore Hall 

SCHOOL OF GENERAL STUDIES Fred V. Cahill, Jr., Dean, 103 Peele Hall 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS Arthur Clayton Menius, Jr., Dean, Riddick Building 

Carey G. Mumford, Assistant to the Dean, Riddick 
Building 

SCHOOL OF TEXTILES M. E. Campbell, Dean, 101 Nelson Building 

GRADUATE SCHOOL Walter J. Peterson, Dean, 145 Gardner Hall 

WUNC-TV Roy J. Johnston, Director of Television 
Charles A. Idol, Engineer in Charge 

LIBRARY H. C. Brown, Librarian, D. H. Hill Library 

COLLEGE EXTENSION E. W. Ruggles, Director, College Extension Division, 118 1911 
Building 

STUDENT AFFAIRS James J. Stewart, Jr., Dean, 101 Holladay Hall 

ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION K. D. Raab, Director, Holladay Hall 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES B. C. Talley, Jr., Director, 206 Holladay Hall 
RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS O. B. Wooldridge, Jr., Director, Y.M.C.A. 
MUSIC ACTIVITIES R. A. Barnes, Director, 102 Putlen Hall 
COLLEGE UNION G. O. T. Erdahl, Director, College Union 

STUDENT HOUSING N. B. Watts, Director, 207 Holladay Hall 

DEPARTMENT OF COUNSELING Lyle B. Rogers, Director, 201 Holladay Hall 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE J.J. Combs, College Physician, Clark Hall 

MILITARY TRAINING Air Force ROTC, Col. Robert C. Paul, 145 Coliseum 
Army ROTC, Col. L. W. Merriam, 154 Coliseum 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Roy B. Clogston, Athletics Director and Director of Coliseum, 

102 Coliseum 

DEVELOPMENT AFFAIRS L. L. Ray, Director of Development and Foundations, 
"A" Holladay Hall 
H. W. Taylor, Director of Alumni Affairs, Alumni Building 
Rudolph Pate, Director of News Bureau, Watauga Hall 

BUSINESS AFFAIRS J. G. Vann, Business Manager, 105 Holladay Hall 

John E. Hills, Assistant Business Manager, Holladay Hall 

W. L. Fleming, Director of Married Student Housing 

John D. Wright, Director of Accounting and Budgets, Holladay Hall 

John C. Williams, Purchasing Agent, 1911 Building 

J. M. Smith, Director of Maintenance and Operations, College Engineer, 
Morris Building 

James S. Fulghum, Jr., Supervisor of Dormitory Rentals, 4 Holladay Hall 

A. G. Sutherland, Director of Dining Halls, Leazar Dining Hall 

L. L. Ivey, Manager of Student Stores, Y.M.C.A. Building 



COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1961-62 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1961 



February 2 


Thursday 


February 3 


Friday 


February 6 


Monday 


February 10 


Friday 


February 17 


Friday 


February 24 


Friday 


March 25 


Saturday 


March 29 


Wednesday 


April 6 


Thursday 


April 8 


Saturday 


May 27 


Saturday 


May 27 


Saturday 


May 29-June 8 


Monday-Saturday 



Orientation of new students. 

Registration. 

Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to register. Last day for refund 

less $5.00 registration fee. 

Last day to add a course. 

Last day to drop a course without failure. 

Mid-term reports. 

Easter holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 

Classwork resumes 7:45 a.m. 

Last day for withdrawing from school 

without failures. 

Last day of classes. 

Commencement. 

Final examinations. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1961 



First Session 




June 12 
June 13 


Monday 
Tuesday 


June 14 
June 19 


Wednesday 
Monday 


June 23 


Friday 


July 4 
July 19 
July 20 


Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 



Orientation of new students. 

Registration for regular session. 

Late registration fee of $5.00 payable by 

all registering after June 13. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to 

withdraw with refund and last day to drop 

any course with refund. 

Last day to drop courses without failure 

and last day to withdraw without failure. 

Holiday. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



Second Session 

July 20 
July 21 

July 24 
July 28 



August 2 

August 24 
August 25 



Thursday 
Friday 

Monday 
Friday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 
Friday 



Orientation of new students. 

Registration. Late registration fee of $5.00 

payable by all registering after July 21. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to with 

draw with refund and last day to drop 

any course with refund. 

Last day to drop courses without failure 

and last day to withdraw without failure. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



FALL SEMESTER, 1961 



September 11 
September 11-13 
September 14 
September 15 

September 15-16 
September 18 
September 22 

September 29 
October 6 
November 11 
November 22 
November 27 
November 28 

December 16 
January 2, 1962 
January 20 
January 22-27 



Monday 

Monday-Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 

Friday-Saturday 

Monday 

Friday 

Friday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Saturday 
Tuesday 
Saturday 
Monday-Saturday 



General Faculty Meeting. 
New Student Orientation. 
Freshman Registration. 
Upperclassman Registration. 
Late registration fee of $5.00 payable by 
all who register after September 15. 
Continuation of New Student Orientation. 
Classes begin — 8:00 a.m. 
Last day for registration. Last day to with- 
draw with refund less $5.00 registration fee. 
Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop a course without failure. 
Mid-term reports. 

Thanksgiving holidays begin — 1:00 p.m. 
Classwork resumes 8 a.m. 

Last day to withdraw from school without 

failures. 

Christmas holidays begin at 12:00 noon. 

Classwork resumes 8:00 a.m. 

Last day of classes. 

Final Examinations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1962 



February 1 


Thursday 


February 2 


Friday 


February 5 


Monday 


February 9 


Friday 


February 16 


Friday 


February 23 


Friday 


March 24 


Saturday 


April 6 


Saturday 


April 18 


Wednesday 


April 26 


Thursday 


May 26 


Saturday 


May 26 


Saturday 


May 28-June 2 


Monday-Saturday 



Orientation of new students. 
Registration. 
Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to register. Last day to with- 
draw with refund less $5.00 registration fee. 
Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop a course without failure. 
Mid-term reports. 

Last day for withdrawing from school 
without failures. 

Easter holiday begins at 6:00 p.m. 

Classwork resumes 7:45 a.m. 

Last day of classes. 

Commencement. 

Final examinations. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1962 



First Session 

June 11 
June 12 
June 13 
June IS 

June 22 



July 4 
July 18 
July 19 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Monday 

Friday 



Wednea day- 
Wednesday 
Thursday 



Orientation of new students. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration and last day 

to withdraw with refund. 

Last day for dropping courses without 

failure and last day to withdraw without 

failure. 

Holiday. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



Second Session 

July 19 
July 20 
July 23 
July 27 

August 1 



August 23 
August 24 



Thursday 
Friday 
Monday 
Friday 

Wednesday 



Thursday 
Friday 



Orientation of new students. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration and last day to 

withdraw with refund. 

Last day for dropping courses without 

failure and last day to withdraw without 

failure. 

Last day of classes. 
Final Examinations. 



10 



General Information 



M»« 




HOLLADAY HALL is the oldest campus building and was once the total 
college plant. The historial edifice now houses central administration which 
includes the chancellor's suite, business office, foundations, dean of faculty, 
dean of student affairs, and registrar's office. 



Familiar 



Campus 
Scenes 



E. S. KING Religious Center is 
a gathering place for State College 
students. The Center houses Dan- 
forth Chapel which is a non- 
denominational house of prayer, 
meditation, and worship. 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



Its Heritage — North Carolina State College is a community dedicated to 
the pursuit of inquiries into the nature of the world and man and to the 
training of students in understanding and participating in such inquiries. 
Founded by legislative act of March 7, 1887, it is the State's technological 
institution of higher learning and Land-Grant College. 

Vitally important to the establishment of the college was the growing 
sentiment in North Carolina at that time to make the State more self-suf- 
ficient economically and less "dependent on the North for technical experts 
and manufactured articles of daily use." Further impetus was provided 
by the fact that although the Morrill Act of 1862 authorized the use of 
public land or its equivalent in land scrip for the creation of an agricultural 
college in each state, North Carolina had not established such a specialized 
institution. 

The North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts opened 
its doors for the first time on October 3, 1889, welcoming 45 students to a 
faculty of six teachers and to a campus of one building, one stable, two 
mules, one horse, and a 60-acre farm on which most of the students could 
"work out" their education. The first president was Colonel Alexander Q. 
Holladay, for whom the first building was later named. 

In 1917, the institution's name was changed to the North Carolina State 
College of Agriculture and Engineering. 

In 1931, the General Assembly formed the Consolidated University of 
North Carolina, embracing the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering in Raleigh, 
and the Woman's College in Greensboro. 

Following World War II, when college personnel and facilities were in- 
volved primarily in the national defense effort, State College expanded 
greatly. Returning service men nearly tripled any previous enrollment, 
and today's student body has stabilized at more than twice the pre-war 
level. State College today is one of the best-housed and best-equipped 
technological institutions of higher learning in the nation. Through these 
expanded operations, State College has grown in size and service to the 
people of North Carolina and in prestige throughout the nation and the 
world for its diverse programs in teaching, research and extension services. 
Now beginning its 72nd year of service, the college has a regular enroll- 
ment averaging 6,300 in a $50 million plus plant, on a campus of 72 major 
buildings, eight schools, 54 departments, with a teaching staff of nearly 
600 and a total staff of 2,000 including administrative, extension, and re- 
search personnel across the State. 

Students of North Carolina State College can be justly proud of its rich 
heritage, including the well-trained alumni who are helping to build a better 
world by applying their technical knowledge to the variety of social prob- 
lems. Their important contributions range from building bridges over giant 
chasms to designing and constructing homes and buildings which are 
pleasant, comfortable and harmonious with modern ways of living; from 
building dams and power plants which permit irrigation and give light and 
power to millions, to teaching farmers all that science has learned about 
agriculture; from clothing the civilized world in the finest and most durable 
raiment the textile industry can produce, to preserving and replanting 
our forests; from building highways throughout the land to creating new 
magic in chemistry and ceramics; from developing and conserving our 
natural resources to extending the frontiers of knowledge through re- 
search. 



14 General Information 

Its Services and Divisions — The major objective of North Carolina State 
College is to provide an opportunity for students to obtain the highest level 
of scientific and technical training and, at the same time, the broad gen- 
eral education which is a basic prerequisite to specialization. The college 
has taken the position that man is first a citizen and then a specialist. He 
must be able to participate as a full-fledged member in the life of the 
community and to make informed judgments about the great variety of 
problems which any citizen faces. In working toward this broad objective, 
State College is organized into eight main instructional divisions : School of 
Agriculture, School of Design, School of Education, School of Engineering, 
School of Forestry, School of General Studies, School of Physical Sciences 
and Applied Mathematics, and School of Textiles. 

With the exception of the School of General Studies, each of these di- 
visions offers numerous curricula leading to baccalaureate degrees. The 
curricula are explained in this bulletin. In addition, through its Graduate 
School, the college offers advanced degrees: Master or Master of Science 
in various departments of the Schools of Agriculture, Education, Engi- 
neering, Forestry and Textiles; Doctor of Philosophy in certain curricula 
in Agriculture, Engineering, and Forestry. The School of General Studies 
provides instruction in the liberal arts and the humanity. It is that part of 
State College especially concerned with helping the student to understand 
the nature of man, the ideas and institutions which he has built and which, 
in turn, have helped to shape his nature, the relation between him and his 
fellows, and the world in which he lives. 

Other divisions of the college are the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
the College Extension Division, the Agricultural Extension Service, and 
the Institute of Statistics. Allied agencies on the campus include the 
State office of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Adminis- 
tration; and offices of the State center of the United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

The services of State College reach the citizenry of the State through 
six principal ways: (1) resident instruction; (2) off-campus instruction in 
established courses through the College Extension Division; (3) off-campus 
demonstration through the Agricultural Extension Service; (4) special 
instruction in technical institutes; (5) industrial and agricultural research — 
both basic and applied; and (6) direct contact with the home through the 
media of radio and television. All of the research and instruction at State 
College are keyed to problems in the economic and cultural life of the State 
and region, and seek to extend the agricultural and industrial development 
of the whole area. 

Its Campus — In the broadest sense, the campus of North Carolina State 
College extends, through services, to the boundaries of the State and be- 
yond into the whole Southern region. But the focal center of these wide- 
spread activities is the State College campus in Raleigh, the State's historic 
capital city, where students have access to a rich reservoir of art treasures, 
library facilities, churches, and other cultural assets. 

Adjoining the central campus at Raleigh are the college farms. In ad- 
dition to these holdings in the Raleigh area, the State College Experiment 
Station operates a number of forest farms in every climatic and geograph- 
ical area of the state, and the School of Forestry has large holdings of 
experimental woodlands in the Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, and the moun- 
tain regions of North Carolina. 

The State College campus has grown from colonial and classical archi- 
tecture on the old or east campus to the latest expression in modern 
architecture on the new or west campus. Good examples of the traditional 
east campus are Holladay and Pullen. Good examples of the modern west 
campus are the College Union and Burlington Nuclear Laboratories. 



General Information 15 

Of the buildings, new and old, a few deserve special mention. 

The Memorial Tower ... a 116-foot campanile of white Mount Airy- 
granite, designed by William Deacy, begun by alumni in 1921 as a monu- 
ment to the 33 State College men who lost their lives in World War I, 
expanded in 1937, and completed in 1949. 

Andrew Johnson House . . . birthplace (1808) of the 17th President of 
the United States, a tiny, gambrel-roof frame structure, removed from 
original site on Fayetteville Street to Pullen Park, and in 1937 moved here 
(admission on application to keeper). 

Holladay Hall . . . oldest building on campus, once the total college plant, 
now completely remodeled inside, housing administration. 

E. S. King Religious Center ... a traditional landmark in the heart of 
the old campus, serving the religious and social life of the college. 

William Neal Reynolds Coliseum . . . one of America's largest indoor 
stadiums, seating 12,500 for sports events and more for stage events using 
the floor, attracting nation-wide basketball games, ice shows, agricultural 
meetings, symphonies, variety shows, and lectures. 

Married Student Hmising Center . . . the center includes 300 units and 
features 120 efficiency, 148 one-bedroom, and 32 two-bedroom apartments. 

Burlington Nuclear Laboratories . . . home of the Nuclear Reactor, which 
has attracted national attention as first nuclear pile to be used entirely 
for teaching and research, first to be operated on any college campus as a 
non-AEC reactor, first to be open for public inspection. 

College Union . . . one of the nation's most modern student-faculty ac- 
tivities centers, with a main lounge, cloak room, snack bar, dining room, 
two private banquet rooms, ballroom, self-operating elevator, several 
telephones, direct telegraph connection, TV sets, Quiet Room, library game 
room, barber shop, 160-seat theater, private rooms with a private balcony, 
seven meeting rooms, and hobby shop. 

Clark Infirmary and Leazar Dining Hall . . . modern buildings, well- 
equipped for their services to the student body. 

Other points of interest . . . are the modern greenhouses accompanying 
Williams, Gardner, and Kilgore Halls; Animal Diagnostic Laboratory, 
Reuben B. Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory, Nelson Textile Building, 
Riddick Engineering Laboratories, Brooks Hall (a union of traditional 
and contemporary architecture), a new gymnasium, and TV studios along 
Western Boulevard. 

Now under construction is a completely modern class room building, close 
to the library and the student center of the campus. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



First, an application form must be submitted. These forms, which indicate 
completely what information is required, may be obtained from and should 
be submitted to: 

Director of Admissions 
Holladay Hall 

North Carolina State College 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



16 General Information 

Applications for admission for both the fall and spring semesters will 
be considered as early as they are submitted. The deadline for the fall 
semester admission applications is September 1 and the deadline for the 
spring semester is January 1. Information concerning graduate student 
admission is found in the Graduate School Catalog which may be obtained 
from: 

Dean of the Graduate School 
Gardner Hall 

North Carolina State College 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Courses of study at North Carolina State College assume the entering 
student has competence in oral and written expression, efficient study and 
reading skills, the mathematical skills normally gained in secondary school 
instruction, and broad preparation in approved fields of study. By action of 
the Board of Trustees students entering any unit of the Consolidated Uni- 
versity must take the College Entrance Examination Board tests as pres- 
cribed from year to year. Information concerning these tests can be 
secured from the Office of Admissions. 

The college enrolls undergraduate students in four classifications: reg- 
ular (degree-seeking students) ; special (no college credit) ; unclassified 
(earning credit but not working for a degree at North Carolina State 
College); and auditor (no credit). 

To be admitted as a regular, degree-seeking student, freshmen must 
submit a certificate of graduation from an accredited high school. It is 
possible for graduates of non-accredited high schools and for mature per- 
sons who have not completed high school to have individual consideration 
for admission. Special examinations may be required in such instances. All 
transfer students except auditors must have transcripts sent to the State 
College Office of Admissions directly from each other college attended. 
Detailed regulations which apply in all cases are discussed in the following 
paragraphs and should be examined carefully by the prospective student. 

Admission requirements are as follows: 

1.. Freshmen — The applicant should be of sound moral character and 
the graduate of an accredited high school. Applicants must take the Schola- 
tic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. Scores on 
this test and the high school record will be considered together in deter- 
mining admissibility. He must have at least 16 units of completed high 
school work, 8^ of which are distributed as follows: 

History and Social Science 1 or 2 English (or English and Speech) 
units (see History and Political 4 units (see English paragraph 
Science paragraph below.) below.) 

Natural Science 1 or 2 units Mathematics 1 x k to 4 units (see 

Mathematics paragraph below.) 

The remainder of the 16 units will be accepted from other courses, except 
that not more than one unit will be accepted from activity courses such 
as physical education, music, band, or military science. 

English Composition — Students who show lack of proficiency in English 
by scores made on the entrance examination are advised to take a special 
non-credit course in English composition before taking the regular credit 
course in English. This remedial work may be taken in summer school or 
by correspondence before the first regular semester. Such students usually 
are invited to come to the college for counseling and further testing to 
help them plan their preparation. Students with high marks on the verbal 



General Information 17 

part of the entrance examination are invited to participate in an accelerated 
English program. Foreign students lacking a satisfactory command of 
English are required to take special courses in English for foreign students 
until they are skillful enough in the language to proceed with regular 
courses in English. 

Mathematics — One and one-half units of algebra and one unit of plane 
geometry are minimum preparation for all curricula. Students in Engi- 
neering, Design, Agricultural Engineering, Physical Science and Applied 
Mathematics, and Mathematics Education must present solid geometry for 
admission or take a special non-credit course offered for applicants who have 
not taken solid geometry in high school. A student may not be regularly 
enrolled at the college until deficiences (with the exception of solid geometry) 
are removed. He must either complete required courses in mathematics in 
high school before applying to State College, or take them in summer school 
or by correspondence from the Extension Division of the college prior to 
entering. 

History and Political Science — If the student does not offer American 
History for admission, he must complete one semester of American History 
or American Government as part of his college program. If he is officially 
registered for that course, he will receive college credit for it. Foreign 
students are required to complete a course in American History before 
graduation. 

2. Transfers — Admission with Advanced Standing — All students who 
transfer to State College from other colleges must present official trans- 
cripts of work taken at the other institutions. A complete separate, official 
transcript must be sent directly to the Admissions Office from each in- 
stitution attended. The prospective transfer student must be eligible to 
return to the institution last attended. The student's record, if of average 
grade or above, will be evaluated by the dean or director of instruction 
of the school in which the student wishes to register. A $2.00 transcript 
evaluation fee, payable to the Office of Registration, is charged for this 
service. Evaluation by the school will be final. Students whose records show 
below average work cannot be admitted to State College unless such ad- 
mission is approved by the Admissions Committee. No previously earned 
credit can be erased from a student's record. Failure of the student to 
present transcripts from all colleges previously attended may result in 
his dismissal from State College. 

Students seeking to transfer with fewer than 29 semester hours of col- 
lege credit will ordinarily be required to meet the entrance examination 
standards which apply to beginning freshmen. Students with 29 semester 
hours of college credit but lacking credit with average grade or better 
in both college algebra and college English, and students seeking to transfer 
from non-accredited institutions, also must meet the examination 
requirement. 

3. Unclassified Students — Admission of an unclassified student requires 
the recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student wishes 
to enroll. Unclassified students must meet the same requirements as regular 
students and must adhere to the rules and regulations of the college. If at 
a later date an unclassified student wishes to change to regular status, his 
credits must be evaluated for his major. Credits earned by the student 
while he is unclassified will be accepted only if he has completed the proper 
prerequisites. Where credit is allowed, the student will receive the grades 
he earned in the courses accepted for credit. 

4. Special Students — No College Credit — Admission to the college in this 
category requires the recommendation of the dean of the school concerned 
and will be granted only upon submission of satisfactory records of edu- 
cation and experience. The usual college entrance requirements may be 
waived for mature students, but regular college rules of scholarship will 



18 General Information 

apply after admission. The special student may not represent the college 
in any intercollegiate contest or become a member of any fraternity, pro- 
fessional or social. Work taken as a special student does not carry college 
credit. 

5. Auditor — Admission as an auditor requires the permission of the in- 
structor and department head. The participation of auditors in class dis- 
cussion or in tests or examinations is optional with the instructor. Auditors 
receive no credit for the course; they are, however, expected to attend 
classes regularly. 

6. Readmission of Former North Carolina State College Students — To be 

readmitted after having withdrawn from the college or after having been 
out of school for one or more semesters, the student should apply to the 
Office of Admissions and Registration for readmission at least 30 days 
prior to the date of desired enrollment. 

7. Graduate Students — All students working toward advanced degrees 
are enrolled in the Graduate School. Procedures and policies governing 
graduate instruction are outlined in a special catalog issued by the school. 
Any student interested in enrolling for graduate study may obtain a copy 
of The Graduate School Catalog from: 

Dean of the Graduate School 
Gardner Hall 

North Carolina State College 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



GRADES AND SCHOLARSHIP 



Grading System — North Carolina State College operates on a credit-point 
system. Semester credits represent the number of hours completed with 
a passing grade; quality points are determined by the grade earned. 

4 quality points for each credit hour. 

3 quality points for each credit hour. 

2 quality points for each credit hour. 

1 quality point for each credit hour. 

quality point for each credit hour 

credit hours and quality points 
AB Absent from 
examination 
IN Incomplete 

S Satisfactory (for graduate students) 
U Unsatisfactory (for graduate students) 
P Passed (for graduate students) 
D* Failure removed by re-examination (for seniors only) 

Explanations — At the discretion of the teacher, a student who has at 
least a C average in a course may be given an incomplete grade for work 
not completed because of a serious interruption in the student's work not 
caused by his own negligence. An incomplete grade must be made up 
during the next semester the student is in residence, unless the department 
involved is not able to allow the make-up. In the latter case, the depart- 
ment will notify the student and the Office of Registration when the in- 
complete must be made up. Any incomplete not removed during the period 
specified by the department will automatically become a failure and will 
be recorded as "Fi". 

A grade of "Fa" is recorded for an unexcused absence from examination. 
If an absence from examination is excused, the student must take the 



A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C Average 

D Passing 

F, FA, FD Failing 

AU Audit 



General Information 19 

examination during the next semester he is in residence or a grade of "Fa" 
will be recorded. 

A grade of "Fd" is posted if a student has unofficially dropped a course 
for which he has been scheduled, or if he has officially dropped after the 
final date for dropping courses without failure. A failure may be made up 
only by repeating the subject. Such a repeat course must be regularly 
scheduled on the student's roster. 

Any student who fails a course within two semesters of graduation 
and who fails only one course during that semester may apply to the 
Office of Registration for permission to remove that failure by standing 
for re-examination on the total subject matter of the course. 

If a senior fails more than one course during the next to the last semester 
and removes all but one of these deficiencies by repeating the course or 
courses, and if he has not had another re-examination, he may apply at the 
end of his last semester in residence for permission to take a re-examination. 

When such a re-examination is taken to remove an "F", only the re- 
examination will be counted. And a senior who has passed a re-examination 
will have his grade for this course changed from "F" to D*, which is 
equivalent in quality points to a grade of "D". A fee of $5.00 will be 
charged for such a re-examination. 

During the first two years of residence at this institution and the summer 
sessions immediately following (or until 63 semester hours have been earned 
in residence and /or by transfer), students may repeat courses passed for 
the purpose of improving their understanding of the basic subject matter. 
Such a repeat must be made in the next subsequent semester in which the 
course is offered. When a course is repeated, only the last grade will be con- 
sidered in the college scholarship standards. Thereafter, a student may 
repeat a course previously passed only by auditing the course. At the 
student's request, the teacher may allow an auditor full participation in 
all class activities. Courses audited will count the same as credit courses 
in computing a student's academic load, except for veteran benefits. 

Scholarship Standards — Semester Rule — Any student carrying 14 or more 
semester hours must pass at least six hours his first semester and eight 
hours each semester thereafter. Students carrying less than 14 hours must 
pass at least half of the work in order to continue. 

1.5 to 2.0 Average Rules — Students who have 40 or more semester hours 
of college credit are expected to maintain a 2.0 quality point average. 
Students who have fewer than 40 semester hours are expected to maintain 
a 1.5 quality point average. Any student who fails to meet these standards 
shall be placed on provisional status. Students will enter provisional status 
at the start of either the fall or spring semester. Any student on provisional 
status who fails to meet scholarship standards within two semesters and 
included summer sessions will be suspended. 

In addition to the 29 semester hours of earned credit and the 1.5 schol- 
astic average, a student in the School of Engineering must have earned a 
minimum grade of "C" on MA 102 to be eligible to roster courses taught by 
the School of Engineering above the freshman level. 

Graduation Requirement — A student is scholastically eligible for grad- 
uation when he has satisfied all the specific requirements of his department, 
his school, and the college, and has earned at least an accumulated 2.0 
average. 

To be graduated with high honors, the student shall have attained a 
3.5 quality point average on all semester hours carried at this institution 
(or at one or both of the other units of the University of North Carolina). 



20 General Information 

To be graduated with honors, the student shall have attained a 3.0 quality 
point average on all semester hours carried at this institution (or at one 
or both of the other units of the University of North Carolina). 

Residence Requirement — A candidate for the bachelor's degree who 
transfers from some other institution must spend at least one academic year 
in residence and earn a minimum of 24 semester hours before being eligible 
for a degree. Residence at the other two units of the University of North 
Carolina is considered residence at this institution. 

Classification Requirements — Students progress from one class to a higher 
class after they have completed the required number of hours for the 
higher classification. At the present time students are classified at the 
beginning of the fall semester and at no other time. 

Freshman: 1-28 semester hours of earned credit 

Sophomore: 29-62 semester hours of earned credit 

Junior: 63-96 semester hours of earned credit 

Senior: 97 or more semester hours of earned 

credit 
Professional (School of Design) : 140 or more semester hours 



GENERAL POLICIES 



Grades and Residence at Other Units of The University of North 
Carolina — For courses transferred from the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill and the Woman's College at Greensboro the student re- 
ceives full credit and the same quality points he would have received if the 
same grades had been made on these courses at North Carolina State 
College. Residence is also interchangeable. 

Required Freshman English and Required Physical Education — Each 

student is expected to schedule required freshman English and required 
freshman and sophomore physical education every semester until these 
courses are passed satisfactorily. 

Withdrawals from the College — Students who desire to leave college 
during a semester or summer session must withdraw officially. There is 
no penalty if a student withdraws prior to the date specified in the college 
calendar as the last date for withdrawing without failures. Failures are 
recorded on all courses for students who withdraw after that date. A student 
who desires to withdraw should report to the Counseling Center in Holladay 
Hall for a withdrawal blank and instructions. A student completing a 
semester or summer session and not planning to return need not officially 
withdraw. 

Changes in Curricula — Students may change from one curriculum to 
another by filing with the Office of Registration (at the time of registration) 
a curriculum change card signed by the dean or director of instruction 
concerned. Such changes are effective only at the beginning of a semester 
or summer session. 

Scholastic Loads — A student may not carry more than 21 semester hours, 
nor less than 12 semester hours, during a regular semester without se- 
curing the written approval of the dean or director of instruction of his 
school. For a six-week summer session a student must have the same 
approval if he carries more than seven semester hours. Veterans or other 
students receiving federal educational benefits must meet the load re- 
quirements of the appropriate federal agency. 



General Information 21 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PAYMENT 



The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less than for 
nonresidents. A legal resident of North Carolina is one who has his domicile 
in this state. It is important that each applicant for admission and each 
enrolled student know his residence status for tuition payment and under- 
stand the regulations governing residence status. The following regulations 
cover most factual situations: 

1. A person 21 years of age or older is not deemed eligible for the lower 
tuition rate unless he has maintained his legal residence in North Carolina 
for at least the six months next preceding the date of his first enrollment 
in an institution of higher education in this state. 

2. The legal residence of a person under 21 years of age at the time of 
his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in this state is that 
of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where parents 
are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the father will con- 
trol unless custody of the minor has been awarded by court order to the 
mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim of residence in 
North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian in North Carolina will 
be considered if either parent is still living unless the action of the court 
appointing the guardian antedates the student's first enrollment in a North 
Carolina institution of higher education by at least 12 months. 

3. The residence status of any student is determined as of the time of his 
first enrollment in an institution of higher education in North Carolina and 
may not thereafter be changed except: (a) in the case of a nonresident minor 
student at the time of his first enrollment whose parents have subsequently 
established legal residence in North Carolina; and (b) in the case of a 
resident who abandons his legal residence in North Carolina. In either case, 
the appropriate tuition rate will become effective at the beginning of the 
semester or term next following the date of change of residence status. 

4. The legal residence of a wife follows that of her husband, except that 
a woman student currently enrolled in this institution as a resident may 
continue as a resident even though she marry a nonresident. 

5. Military personnel attached to military posts or reservations in North 
Carolina are not considered eligible for the lower tuition rate unless they 
have maintained a legal residence in the state for at least the six months 
next preceding the date of first enrollment in an institution of higher educa- 
tion in the state. 

6. Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence 
who have established a legal residence in North Carolina according to 
Paragraphs number 1, 2, or 4, above, are eligible for the lower tuition rate. 

7. Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the State of North 
Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for the lower tuition 
rate. 

8. Discretion to adjust individual cases within the spirit of these regula- 
tions is lodged in the Vice President and Finance Officer of the University. 

Any student or prospective student in doubt concerning his residence 
status must bear the responsibility for securing a ruling by stating his case 

in writincr tn thp Chan pel lor. 



in writing to the Chancellor. 



22 General Information 

TUITION AND FEES 



Charges for tuition and fees vaiy according to (1) the student's status 
as a resident or non-resident of North Carolina; (2) type of student (regular 
undergraduates, special or unclassified undergraduate, auditor or graduate 
student); and (3) to a minor degree the curriculum in which the student 
is enrolled. 

An application for admission must be accompanied by an application fee 
of $10. This fee is refunded to students whose applications are denied. It 
is forfeited by applicants who are accepted but who do not enroll. 

Tuition and fees are payable in advance of each semester. All charges 
are subject to change without notice, but the charges in effect currently are 
as follows: 

Regular Undergraduate Students: 

School In-State Students 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Agriculture $149 $142 

Design 148 142 

Education: 

Agricultural Education 149 142 

Others 146 140 

Engineering 148 142 

Forestry 158 142 

Physical Sciences and 

Applied Mathematics 148 142 

Textiles 148 142 

• Add $10 if not registered in first semester. 

Late Registration Fee — All students, graduate and undergraduate, who 
fail to register on dates scheduled must pay a $5.00 late registration fee. 

Undergraduate Students Taking Less Than Seven Hours — Undergraduate 
students taking one course of not more than four hours during a regular 
semester will be charged one-fourth tuition, one-fourth academic fees and no 
non-academic fees. These students will not be entitled to any of the services 
and privileges provided by the non-academic fees. Undergraduate students 
taking five or six hours during a regular semester will be charged one-half 
tuition, one-half academic fees and all non-academic fees. All other under- 
graduate students will pay full tuition and fees. 

Auditors — Subject to academic regulations regularly enrolled under- 
graduate students may audit courses without additional charge. Those not 
regularly enrolled, or registering for audits only, will pay the rates ap- 
plicable to undergraduate students. 

Graduate Students — Applicants interested in graduate work may re- 
ceive a schedule of fees upon application to the Graduate School. 

Commencement Fee — A fee of $9.00 covering cost of diploma and rental 
cap and gown, is charged candidates for the baccalaureate degree during 
the last semester before the degree is awarded. 

Deposits — (a) As partial security for military uniforms, library books, 
laboratory equipment, etc., a general deposit of $20 is required to be paid 
by regularly enrolled undergraduate students at the time of their first 
enrollment (see also under "Refunds"). 



Out-of-State 
Students 

First Second 
Semester Semester 


$324 
323 


$317 
317 


324 
321 
323 
333 


317 
315 
317 
317* 


323 
323 


317 

317 



General Information 23 

(b) Certain departments are allowed to collect small deposits in addition 
to the general deposit referred to above, for such things as room keys, 
lockers, etc. In such instances departmental regulations will apply. 

Staff — Full-time members may register for one three hour course at a 
flat rate of $15 per semester. This payment does not include non-academic 
fees, and none of the privileges attendant upon the payment of such fees 
are allowed. 

Audits — Subject to academic regulations, regularly enrolled graduate or 
undergraduate students may audit courses by registering for them. The 
first audit will be disregarded in determination of course load on which 
tuition and fee payments are based, but any additional audits are to be 
added to the course load at full credit hour value. Students registered for 
audits only will pay the rates applicable to special unclassified students. 
Full-time staff members may register for and audit one course per semester 
without charge. 

Professional Student* in Engineering — Students in the various fifth-year 
professional curricula will be charged on same basis as "Special and Un- 
classified Students." 

Thesis Preparation — Graduate students who have completed course re- 
quirements and are in residence for thesis work only will be charged $15 
per semester for tuition, plus all non-academic fees. Graduate students not 
in residence who have completed all requirements for the degree sought 
except for the thesis will be required to register for the term in which 
final requirements for the degree are to be completed and pay $15 tuition 
fee. 

Degree Only — Graduate students who have completed all requirements 
for the degree sought are required to register for the term in which the 
degree will be awarded and pay a tuition fee of $10. 

Room Rent — Rooms in the college dormitories rent for $85 per person 
per semester. In addition, the student must include with his remittance a 
deposit of $2.00 for his room and mail box keys. This deposit will be re- 
funded when the keys are returned to the Dormitory Rental Office. Each 
student must provide his own linens, blankets, and pillow. Dormitory room 
applications are for the period of a school year and the rent is payable in 
advance prior to the beginning of each semester as announced. When a new 
student is accepted by the college, he is sent a letter of clearance together 
with a dormitory room reservation request form. If he wishes to reserve a 
dormitory room, he should fill out the reservation request and return it with 
his remittance. Rooms will be assigned in the order in which payment of 
rent is received. Individual preferences as to location of room and /or choice 
of roommate will be compiled with as far as possible. All reservations are 
subject to published dormitory rules and regulations. Male freshman stu- 
dents are required to live in the college dormitories unless living with 
parents or relatives. 

Board — Meals are served cafeteria style, and the cost depends upon the 
individual student. Average cost would be approximately $550 per year. 

Books and Supplies — The cost for books and supplies is variable, depending 
upon the curriculum in which the student is enrolled. A reasonable estimate 
would be $100 per year, but students who have to buy drawing supplies 
and slide rules have an additional original outlay. All books and supplies 
are paid for in cash as purchased. 

Estimated Annual Cost — Items such as tuition, fees, and room rent in 
dormitories are fixed. Others are variable with the individual student. 



Hrst Semester 


Second Semester 


Year 


$ 75 


$ 75 


$150 


73 


67 


140 


20 
85 
250-300 

50-100 


85 
250-300 

25 


20 
170 
500- 
600 

75- 
125 


100-150 


100-150 


200- 




$602-702 


300 


$653-803 


$1255- 
1505 


$828-987 


$777-877 


$1605- 
1855 



24 General Information 



Tuition 

(Non-resident students 

add $175 per semester) 
Other College Fees 
General Deposit (Paid only 

upon first enrollment) 
Room 
Board 

Books and supplies 

Other personal expenses 
and incidentals 

Total (N. C. residents) 
Total (non residents) 

Late Registration — Registration schedules are set for specific days, and 
certain definite procedures are outlined. A student has not completed reg- 
istration until all the required steps are taken. All students, graduate and 
undergraduate, who fail to register on dates scheduled must pay a $5.00 
late registration fee. 

Refunds — Tuition and Fees — A student who withdraws from school on or 
before the last day for registration will receive a refund of the full amount 
paid, less a $5.00 registration fee. On withdrawal later than the period 
specified, no refund will be made. 

Room Rent — Refund of room rent will be made if reservation is cancelled : 

a. Prior to the first day of the registration period, the rent paid will be 
refunded less a $10 reservation fee. 

b. During the registration period, the rent paid will be refunded less 
a $10 reservation fee or a charge of $1.00 per day (whichever amount is 
greater) from the first day of the registration period (or date of reser- 
vation, whichever is later) to date of cancellation. 

c. After the last day for registration, no refund will be made for any 
reason other than withdrawal from college. 

Cancellation of reservations must be made in person or in writing to: 

Supervisor of Dormitory Rentals 

Room 4 

Holladay Hall 

North Carolina State College 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

General Deposit — The general deposit is refunded when a student has 
completed the requirements for a degree or has dropped out of school. The 
student must apply to the Business Office for the refund at which time a 
correct mailing address must be given. Refund will be made by check after 
30 days from date application is received. 

Refund Committee — In some instances circumstances justify the waiving 
of rules regarding refunds. An example might be withdrawal from school 
because of illness. Students have the privilege of appeal to the Refund 
Committee when they feel that special consideration is merited. Applications 
for such appeals may be secured from the Division of Student Affairs. 



General Information 25 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES 



State College makes every effort to provide the student with surroundings 
which are pleasant and conducive to intellectual growth. Respecting the 
student as an individual, the college assures him the maximum of personal 
liberty within the limits necessary for orderly progression of class work. 
In return, he is expected to pay serious attention to his purpose in at- 
tending college and to observe rules of conduct consistent with maturity. 
Through the various services and activities identified with everyday life 
on the campus, as well as through the several extracurricular organizations 
and functions, the student at State College has an excellent opportunity for 
acquiring experience in group leadership and community living which he 
may take with him into his professional career. 

As the student progresses in his development, especially after his fresh- 
man year, he will find many opportunities to increase his growth in 
citizenship by participating in the activities of his academic class and of 
the student body in general. Following is a survey of the various activities 
at State College. 

Student Government and Honor System — When a student enters State 
College, he becomes a member of a self-governing community. 

Legislative, executive, and judicial authority, insofar as student affairs 
are concerned, rest with the Student Government which operates within the 
framework of over-all college administration. The Student Government 
members and Judicial Department members are elected in campus-wide 
elections. The student has a voice in his own government by participating 
in these elections. Often in general elections he is asked to vote on pro- 
posed changes in regulations which affect the student body. 

The student also becomes part of the Honor System. He is expected to 
adhere to its general aims which are honesty in class work and honor in 
general conduct. 

Clubs and Societies — Through the various honorary, professional, techni- 
cal, and social orgainzations at State College, the interested student finds 
many opportunities to participate in activities that appeal to him and to 
meet others who have similar interests. 

College Honorary — Honorary societies and fraternities at State College 
are Golden Chain, senior leadership; Blue Key, junior leadership; Thirty 
and Three, sophomore leadership; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholarship; 
and Phi Kappa Phi, junior, senior, and graduate student scholarship. 

Professional and Technical — Each school at State College sponsors or 
supervises a large number of professional and technical societies and 
clubs. Students in every area of instruction are encouraged to join with 
their fellow students in pursuing their common interests. Many of these 
organizations contribute greatly to the student's professional and social 
growth. 

Social Fraternities — Eighteeen national social fraternities have chapters 
at State College. Each sends two representatives to the Interfraternity 
Council which has as its objectives promoting the general interests and 
welfare of the associated fraternities and insuring cooperation between 
them in their relations with the faculty, the student body, and the general 
public. 

The social fraternities are Alpha Gamma Rho, Delta Sigma Phi, Farm- 
house, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Epsilon Pi, 
Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 



2G General Information 

Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, and Theta Chi. 

State College has one sorority, Sigma Kappa, which recently was organ- 
ized. 

Student Publications — State College has a variety of publications, both 
general and school-sponsored, edited and managed by student officers, 
with faculty members serving as advisers. A student may gain journalistic 
experience and training in writing, editing, or management by working 
on these publications. 

The three general publications, The Agromeck, The Student Broadcasting 
System, and The Technician, are supported in large part by a publication 
fee which is a part of each student's fees. 

The Agromeck is the college yearbook, providing a record of the classes 
and of the principal events of the school year. The yearbook recalls in 
pictures the varied activities of the student body throughout the year and 
is published for the entire student body. 

Although it is not a "publication" in the strictest sense of the word, 
The Student Broadcasting System, a carrier-current station with coverage 
limited to the campus, serves the same function through a different medium. 
It offers many opportunities for extra-curricular training in actual broad- 
casting techniques as well as training in administration and program 
planning. 

The Technican is a student newspaper, issued three times a week and 
delivered to the dormitories and fraternity houses. Students living off- 
campus receive their copies of the newspaper by mail. The Technician serves 
as a forum for student expression as well as a medium for news of par- 
ticular interest to State College students. 

Each student receives a copy of The Tower, the college handbook, which 
contains detailed information about student regulations, organizations, 
and activities. 

Several of the schools have their own publications which are published 
under the general supervision of the particular school and deal with 
material of special interest to students in that school. 

These publications include The Agriculturist, published by the School of 
Agriculture; The Pi-Ne-Tum, published by the School of Forestry; The 
Southern Engineer, published by the School of Engineering; The Textile 
Forum, published by the School of Textiles; and The Publications of the 
School of Design. 

Athletics — In addition to voluntary programs of intramural and inter- 
collegiate sports, State College requires freshmen and sophomores to enroll 
in credit courses in physical education. Juniors and seniors may take 
physical education as an elective. 

Intramural — The college maintains an extensive program of intramural 
sports which is administered by the Department of Physical Education. 
Participation in these sports is purely voluntary and college credit is not 
given. Competition in 13 sports is engaged in by dormitory and fraternity 
leagues. 

Sports used in the intramural program are correlated with those used 
in the required class work in physical education. Instruction in the sports 
is given in the classes, and opportunity for competition is provided in the 
intramural program. Winners in these competitions are awarded cups, 
shields, and trophies. An Intramural Advisory Board composed of student 
representatives assists the director of the intramural program. 



General Information 27 

For intramural competition as well as for classes in physical education, 
Frank Thompson Gymnasium has a swimming pool, a large playing area 
for basketball, an auxiliary gymnasium with three handball courts, a 
room for wrestling, a locker room, and showers. Fields are provided for 
intramural and recreational play. Six semi-hard-surface and 14 hard-surface 
courts are available for tennis. The construction of additional courts is 
being considered. 

The new gymnasium has 10 four-wall handball courts, six squash courts, 
and separate rooms for boxing and wrestling, golf, correctives and weight- 
lifting. The main gymnasium floor provides seven basketball courts which 
may be adjusted to accommodate eight volleyball courts, 20 badminton 
courts, indoor tennis, and various other sports. This space also includes a 
gymnastic area the size of a regulation basketball court. 

The swimming pool, located in an adjoining building, is 25 meters 
by 25 yards with two one-meter and one three-meter diving boards. 

Intercollegiate — Intercollegiate athletics at State College come under the 
supervision of a separate department of the college. Policies governing 
intercollegiate competition are recommmended, however, by the Athletic 
Council, composed of faculty, students, and alumni, in full accord with 
the Atlantic Coast Conference rules of eligibility for intercollegiate con- 
tests. Membership of the Atlantic Coast Conference includes in addition 
to State College, Duke University, Wake Forest College, the University of 
North Carolina, the University of Maryland, Clemson College, and the 
University of South Carolina. 

The program in intercollegiate athletics consists of the organizations 
and training of "Wolfpack" teams in football, basketball, baseball, track, 
cross-country, wrestling, swimming, tennis, golf, soccer, fencing, and 
rifle competition. 

Facilities for intercollegiate athletics at State College include Riddick 
Stadium, a 20,000-seat stadium for football; William Neal Reynolds Col- 
iseum, a 12,500-seat arena for basketball; six football practice fields, 20 
tennis courts, two 25-yard swimming pools, one of Olympic dimensions; 
two gymnasiums, one new; a basketball field, and facilities in the Coliseum 
for wrestling and other sports. 

Music— Since the early days of North Carolina State College, its musical 
organizations have played an important part in the life of the campus. 
These groups present concerts, furnish music for official college functions, 
and perform at athletic events. 

The combined membership of these organizations constitutes the largest 
voluntary student organization on campus. 

The Men's Glee Club performs several concerts each year, both on and 
off the campus. In addition to these concerts, this group makes appearances 
on television and radio. The club also makes tours and provides small 
ensemble music for special occasions. 

The Symphonic Band, the Fanfare Band, the Marching Band, and the 
ROTC Band make up the four divisions of the North Carolina State 
Bands. Each band serves a specific purpose in the musical life on the campus. 
Assignments to the various bands are made according to the interests 
and ability of the individual student. 

The Symphonic and Fanfare Bands are concert organizations. Students 
who are unable to meet the rigid requirements for Symphonic Band are 
eligible to try for the Fanfare Band. 

The Marching Band operates primarily during football season and is 
widely known for its spectacular half-time performances. 



28 General Information 

The ROTC Band consists of freshman and sophomore ROTC and AFROTC 
students. Participation in band excuses the student from all ROTC drill 
on the field. 

The student who spends a great deal of time studying finds music to be 
ft very stimulating activity. Participation in music helps the student 
maintain a healthy attitude toward college and toward life in general. 
Rehearsal schedules have been carefully arranged to avoid conflicts with 
other classes or with study time. 

Additional information concerning music activities can be obtained by 
writing or visiting the Director of Music in Pullen Hall. 

Student Centers — The student at State College finds that a great deal of 
his extra-curricular activity centers around two buildings, the E. S. King 
Religions Center and the College Union. The E. S. King Religious Center 
has long served the college as a religious center. The College Union has 
provided State College students with entertainment and with opportunities 
and facilities for recreation and relaxation. The building offers to both 
students and faculty a variety of features. 

On the ground floors are a snack bar, a small dining room, game rooms, 
a barber shop, and telephones. The main floor has a ballroom (which may 
be used for an assembly room), a library, lounges, a gallery area for 
exhibits, and facilities for two small dining rooms. The second floor houses 
the College Union offices, a photographic darkroom, guest rooms, a quiet 
room, a room for listening to music, a theater, a workshop, meeting rooms, 
and student organization offices. 

The College Union serves a great many purposes. Its most obvious funct- 
ion is to provide a center where students can meet their friends. Through 
its widely varied program, however, the Union serves a deeper function 
by introducing the student to the art of leisure-time living and by providing 
opportunities for leadership. Further, the College Union provides a show- 
case where the student may display his artistic talents in the form of 
exhibits, workshops, and entertainment. Each student is invited to work 
on one of the College Union committees and to take an active part in the 
Union program. 

In addition to the functions and activities housed in the College Union 
Building, many other activities, especially those of a religious, spiritual 
and devotional nature, are held within the E. S. King Religious Center. It 
offers to the students an attractive lobby equipped with writing and 
reading tables and comfortable chairs, a television room, and four con- 
ference rooms where student and faculty groups may meet. 

The Danforth Chapel, located in the center, provides a place for religious 
services and meditation for all faiths. 

The E. S. King Religious Center plans social events and lectures on 
various topics related to student life in addition to, or in connection with, 
its programs of religious emphasis. 

Library — The D. H. Hill Library was designed to accommodate all the 
varied functions that a modern college library must perform. It provides 
shelves for 400,000 volumes, seats for 900 readers, private studies and 
conference rooms, and well-lighted ventilated reading rooms. Ample book 
stacks are provided to accommodate a fast-growing book collection, facili- 
ties for photoprinting and microfilming are available, and the service and 
reading areas of the library make a welcome and satisfactory working 
center for the students and faculty of the college. 

The book collection itself strongly reflects the teaching and research 
requirements of State College — that is to say it is primarily scientific and 
technological. There is available, nevertheless, a fine and well-selected 



General Information 29 

collection of books and materials on every phase of cultural interest as 
well as for recreational reading. At the present time the collection numbers 
more than 212,000 volumes. More than 3,000 journals are received cur- 
rently, and more than 3,000,000 documents are held resulting from the 
depository status which the college library holds for publications of the 
Federal Government. 

In the attractive lobby of the building there is arranged a collection of 
books for recreational reading. Students may explore this area as they 
please and check out the books of their choice. The big West Reading 
Room, colorful, well-lighted, and interesting, is an invitation to study, and 
on the top floor is a special smaller study open to the students who prefer 
to work in a more secluded place. 

For the graduate students there are desks and private lockers in the 
stacks and adjoining the ground floor stacks, a large and pleasant room 
where faculty members and graduate students may work. In addition to 
these facilities, there are several conference rooms open to any college 
groups requesting them, and rooms which can be temporarily assigned to 
faculty members. The library is a place for work and for acquiring 
knowledge. It also can be a place for discovering all the wealth of pleasure 
and of widened understanding which books can bring to the student who 
desires to become a man of education and stature. 

In addition to the D. H. Hill Library, specialized branch libraries are 
maintained in the Schools of Textiles and Design. 

Housing — At State College, the dormitory is considered something more 
than merely a suitable place for living and studying. A well-organized 
dormitory program plays an important role in the student's all-around 
development. Under the program, each dormitory is organized much like a 
club, with officers elected by the residents, and paid student managers 
recommended by the dormitory officers and approved by the college. 

Each student is encouraged to participate in the athletic, social, and 
recreational activities of his dormitory and in this way he has an oppor- 
tunity to meet and make friends with students of variant backgrounds, 
to use his leisure time pleasantly and profitable, and to grow in person- 
ality. Each dormitory elects its representatives to the Interdormitory 
Council, a student organization which coordinates interdormitory activities 
and programs. In each of eight major dormitories faculty couples occupy 
apartments and act as hosts. They assist the occupants with their problems 
and provide a pleasant atmosphere in which the parents and friends of 
the occupants can visit the dormitory. 

The college has no dormitory for women students. They must make 
their own housing arrangements. A list of available off-campus rooms 
for rent is maintained at the Dormitory Rental Office in Room 4, Holladay 
Hall. 

For the married student, the college has for rent 300 permanent ef- 
ficiency, one and two bedroom apartments. Priority of occupancy will go to 
graduate students first, prior military servicemen eligible for government 
educational benefits second, and all other married students third. 

At the beginning of the 1960-61 academic year, approximately 326 students 
were housed in off-campus residences maintained by the social fraternities 
which have chapters at State College. Each chapter is represented in the 
Interfraternity Council which sponsors athletic events and social functions 
of particular interest to fraternity members. 

Dormitory Counseling — Each of the dormitories at State College has 
a building manager, an upperclassman with the qualifications for, and re- 
sponsibility of, helping individual students in his dormitory, particularly 
freshmen, in any way he can. Floor managers and assistant floor managers 



30 General Information 

chosen on the same basis, assist the dormitory manager. Whenever these 
managers cannot answer particular questions or give aid in solving special 
problems, they direct the student to the administrative official who can. 
Also, in the larger dormitories, faculty couples are quartered to provide 
the influence and assistance that such mature persons can give. 

Food Services — The State College student does not have to travel far 
for food, whether it is a full meal or a between class snack. 

Leazar Hall, the main dining facility, provides four cafeteria lines where 
the student may secure nutritious food at reasonable prices. Meals are 
served cafeteria style and the cost depends upon the selection of food by 
the student. A typical student may spend approximately $2.00 per day or 
$550 a year for meals, although some students may eat at the college 
cafeteria for as low as $1.25 per day or $300 a year. 

The College Union Building offers dining room facilities for groups and 
a snack bar. Shuttle Inn in the Textile Building serves sandwiches and 
grill items. Shuttle Inn is operated by the Student Supply Store. 

In addition, each dormitory area has its own snack bar, also operated 
by the Student Supply Store system. 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning — The college laundry provides on-campus 
laundry and dry cleaning service on a cash-and-carry basis for both stu- 
dents and staff. The rates are inexpensive. 

Linen Rental Plan — This service provides for an initial issue of two 
sheets, one pillow case, three towels, and a complete change each week 
during the school year. A student availing himself of this service need not 
purchase or bring these items with him when he enters school. The service 
is available to all students at a cost of $20 per school year. Applications 
for the linen rental plan are mailed with dormitory room forms, or they 
may be obtained from the Dormitory Rental Office. 

Barber Service — Two barber shops are provided, one in the E. S. King 
Religious Center and one in the College Union. 

Books and Supplies — State College's ultra-modern Student Supply Store 
located on Dunn Avenue houses an excellent book department, general 
student supplies, engineering equipment, and a fountain-snack bar. 

Alpha Zeta, student honor fraternity, maintains a book exchange in the 
College Union where students may exchange or sell used books. 

Health — State College seeks to safeguard the health of the student in 
every way possible. The college maintains a 76-bed infirmary, open 24 
hours a day, with 15 staff members. There are college physicians, a super- 
vising nurse, a night supervisor, six general duty nurses, one full-time 
laboratory and X-ray technician, and four other employees. Among the 
many valuable features of the infirmary are an up-to-date first aid depart- 
ment and X-ray department. 

The college physicians observe regular daily office hours in the infirmary, 
in the mornings and afternoons. In addition, they visit the infirmary more 
often when necessary. A graduate nurse is on duty day and night. Students 
have free access to the infirmary at all times. 

In case of accident or serious illness of a student, parents or guardians 
will be notified immediately. No surgical operation will be performed 
without full consent of parents or guardians, except in cases of extreme 
emergency. 

The medical fee which each student pays provides for infirmary service, 
general medical treatment, and for the services of nurses. It does not pro- 



General Information 31 

vide for surgical operations, outside hospital care, or the services of dentists 
or other specialists. 

Before the student enters college he should have a complete, thorough 
examination by his family physician. Any abnormality should be noted ana 
S ?emS defects corrected in order to prevent unnecessary loss of time 
whilT?he student is in college. If the examination is : not do^ Jefofe he 
. tors thp student will be even a physical examination at tne conege, 
Riclwtet^ fo/the physical examination can be 

secured from the Office of Admissions and Registration. 

The college offers annually a plan of student accident and health 
insurance The insurance is planned to cover the surgical, accident and 
hospital needs of the student supplementing the services of the infirmary 
Each ye« complete information will be furnished students before the 
opening of school. 

Orientation-Several days before the registration of oPPffJ*^^™ 

the fall semester, new students arrive on the campus for ***™*°**£*gZ 
known as Orientation Week. To help freshmen with the transition trom 
nTgh school to college and to help new students become acquainted w^th 
the campus and with college regulations, the college a "^Vf v eS a nd studerll 
period a series of meetings and conferences with faculty and student 
leaders. 

Throughout the first semester, there are other activities designed to con- 
tinue orientation and to supplement, orientation c ourse t™*™}* £ £j 
individual schools. In addition, the individual schools provide for regular 
ontact with faculty advisers in order that each student has , the oppo rtumty 
for discussing matters connected with his adjustment to college life. 

Counseling: Student Questions and ^}^^^^ a Jr^J^l^ l n fi 
formation center for students at State College is located in Holladay Hall 
ndnSds the offices of the Dean of Student Affairs and of adminis- 
trators handling admissions, registration records, attendance student 
activities, student housing, orientation and counseling, and student finan- 
cial aid. 

Academic— Upon enrolling at State College, each student is assigned a 
faculty adviser, usually a member of the department m which the i student 
is taking his major work. This faculty adviser works with the student in 
plannSf his program of studies and is available for other, help m solving 
Problems of an academic nature. The deans, directors of instruction, and 
SSartoent heads are also available to the student to help him get in- 
formation about the different curricula and to help him think through 
his educational plans. Teachers of courses in which the student is enrolled 
are the best sources of help with particular subjects. Members of the 
fetching staff maintain a schedule of office hours and expect the student to 
consult them individually wherever special help is needed. 

Dormitory Counseling-^ described in the section on Housing, student 
dormitory managers and floor managers and the hosts and hostesses as- 
sjedto the lafger dormitories provide help with various questions and 
problems. 

Counseling Center-The Counseling Center, located on the second floor 
of Holladay Hall, has a staff of full-time counselors to help students *ith 
problems of vocational and curricular choice, and personal, adjustment. 
The center is prepared to administer various aptitude and interest tests 
and maintains a file of occupational information. Referral can be made 
for s™ud?nfs desiring remedial work in speech, reading, and other special 
areas. 

Students may come to the center on their oto in^tive ornaybe 
referred by teachers, advisers, or other members of the ^f^ jtoff. ^iere 
is no cost to the student for conferences but there is a small materials fee 
in cases where a battery of tests is administered. 



32 General Information 

Placement — Each of the degree-granting schools at State College pro- 
vides its students with assistance in obtaining employment during summer 
vacation and upon graduation. In some curricula a period of approved 
summer work is required for graduation. 

Financial Aid — Help in meeting college expenses is available to State 
College students in several forms: scholarships, graduate fellowships and 
assistantships, loans, athletic awards, and part-time jobs. 

Financial aid other than graduate fellowships and assistantships is ad- 
ministered by the Student Financial Aid Officer under the general direction 
of the College Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid. Students seeking 
information or counseling on financial matters, or wishing to apply for 
assistance, should write or come to the Student Financial Aid Office at 
207 Holladay Hall. 

Scholarships are outright grants to undergraduates and include those 
which are available generally, without regard to curriculum, and those 
restricted to the students of particular schools or departments. 

Scholarship applications from entering freshmen are handled under what 
is known as the Talent For Service Scholarship Program. One application, 
which should be filed by January 1st preceding the September of expected 
first enrollment, obtains consideration for essentially all scholarships avail- 
able. Periodically, the college publishes a full listing of scholarships available 
to State College students. Copies of these lists may be obtained from the 
Student Financial Aid Office. 

Graduate Fellotvships are funds offered to graduate students to assist 
in the support of programs of advanced study. Holders of fellowships have 
no obligations to the college and may devote full time to the prosecution 
of their graduate programs. Funds for these fellowships are provided by 
various government agencies, professional groups, and business organi- 
zations. Applicants for fellowships should contact the head of the department 
in which they wish to pursue studies. 

Graduate Assistantships are short-term staff appointments that carry 
stipends ranging from $1,200 to $4,800 depending upon the magnitude of 
the service obligation and the experience of the appointee. Teaching as- 
sistants are customarily appointed annually for the nine months academic 
year. Research assistants are often appointed on a calendar year basis and, 
accordingly, stipends may be 20 per cent larger than those for teaching 
assistants. Only graduate students in good-standing are eligible for appoint- 
ment to graduate assistantships. The course loads permitted graduate 
assistants are adjusted in proportion to the service obligation. Graduate 
assistants giving half-time to their service obligation may register for 60 
per cent of a full course load. 

Athletic Awards are made upon the recommendation of the Athletic De- 
partment to athletes who meet the established qualifications for such 
awards. 

Loans are made on a long-term, low-interest basis to deserving students, 
ordinarily with the understanding that repayment will be made after the 
student leaves the college permanently. Usually such loans do not exceed 
$500 per student per year. Short-term emergency loans, generally not 
exceeding $50 are also available. State College participates in the National 
Defense Student Loan Program. Plans for budgeting college costs over a 
period of years are available to State College students and their parents. 
Pre-Paid Education Plans are offered by a number of banks and insurance 
companies. 

A Part-time Employment Service is provided to assist students in locating 
jobs both on and off campus. Students who desire part-time work should 
call at the Financial Aid Office when they arrive on the campus. 



School of Agriculture 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

H. B. James, Dean 

E. W. Glazener, Director of Instruction 

The agriculture of our modern world amounts to more than growing food 
and fiber. Agriculture includes all of the technical, professional, and busi- 
ness occupations connected with the processing and distribution of farm 
products. 

The men who produce and supply the farmer with his complex needs, 
the farmer himself, those to whom he sells, the processor of these products, 
and the retailer are all part of today's agriculture. 

All told, they add up to nearly 40 per cent of the 65 million employed 
people in the United States making agriculture the nation's biggest single 
industry. There are more than 500 distinct occupations in today's agricul- 
ture — jobs that each year need more than twice the number of people 
trained to fill them. 

The new concept of agriculture is defined to include three important 
groups in our economy. The first is the farmers themselves. The people who 
are engaged in the production of crops and livestock. The second includes 
those industries which furnish supplies and services to farmers. The third 
includes those industries which process, store, handle, and merchandise farm 
products. 

The overall objective of the School of Agriculture is the development of 
well-rounded, educated citizens capable of assuming important roles in 
business science, and technology as they relate to farming and associated 
industries. 

Facilities — A sound teaching and research program is based on taking 
advantage of the most modern equipment available in each field. North 
Carolina State College is fortunate to have at its disposal the newest equip- 
ment and facilities in many fields. 

Laboratories are well equipped with the necessary materials for learning 
and practicing the basic and applied sciences. Machinery and equipment, in 
some cases provided by private industry, keep students abreast of the latest 
technological advances. Extensive plant, animal, and insect collections are 
available for use in teaching and for research. 

The D. H. Hill Library at State College has a large collection of scientific 
books and periodicals which provides excellent source material for many 
courses. In addition, students may draw from the specialized periodicals and 
textbooks located in the department libraries. 

State College's 17 outlying research farms provide a practical classroom 
for many courses, as well as a place where researchers can carry on basic 
and applied research. 

Student Activities — Students in the School of Agriculture have ample 



36 School Of Agriculture 

opportunities to take part in many broadening extra-curricular activities, 
both within the school and in the college itself. 

Most departments have student organizations which provide professional 
as well as social experience. Student tours provide an opportunity to see 
first-hand the application of classroom principles. 

In addition, judging teams representing animal industry, horticulture, 
and poultry compete regionally and nationally providing student members 
a chance to travel while learning more about their field. 

Curricular Offerings and Requirements — The modern concept of agricul- 
ture has given State College's oldest school its newest look. 

A freshman enrolling in the School of Agriculture now chooses from 
three curricula — agricultural business, agricultural science, or agricultural 
technology — devised to more closely parallel the new concept. 

After completing the first two years, consisting largely of basic courses 
in the biological, physical, and social sciences, the student can choose his 
major from among the 34 offered by the school. 

The student's needs for learning "how to make a living" and for learning 
"how to live" are both given consideration in the three curricula. Not only 
does each student get the solid background in science so necessary for 
today's agriculture, he has a chance to develop a program to fit his individ- 
ual needs and wants. 

Although requirements vary in the curricula, students in all three get a 
solid background in the sciences, plus a variety of electives. All the curri- 
cula have requirements in English and modern languages, the social sciences 
and humanities, and the physical and biological sciences. In addition, 
electives can be chosen from several specified areas (see curricula listing 
below), depending on the curriculum. The student also will have depart- 
mental requirements and electives in his major field. 

In general, requirements are similar no matter which curriculum the 
student chooses. However, the program in science places more emphasis 
on the physical and biological sciences, while that in business emphasizes 
economics and business management, and the course in technology is 
stronger in the applied science and technology courses. In some cases, a 
student may take the same major in any of the three curricula, depending 
on his interest and objectives. 

The majors offered in the three curricula are as follows: 

Agricultural Business — Agricultural economics, animal husbandry, dairy 
manufacturing, dairy husbandry, field crops, horticulture, poultry science, 
and soils. 

Agricultural Science — Agricultural economics, agricultural engineering 
(joint program with the School of Engineering) , animal husbandry, botany, 
dairy manufacturing, dairy husbandry, entomology, field crops, horti- 
culture, poultry science, rural sociology, soils, wildlife biology, and zoology. 
Pre-veterinary work also is taken in this curriculum. 

Agricultural Technology — Agricultural economics, agricultural engineer- 
ing, animal husbandry, field crops, horticulture, plant protection, poultry 
science, and soils. 



School Of Agriculture 37 

Degrees — The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon the satis- 
factory completion of one of the curricula in this school. 

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture and professional 
degrees are offered in the various departments of the School of Agriculture 
after the satisfactory completion of at least one year of graduate study in 
resident. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered by the following departments : 
Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Animal Industry, Field 
Crops, Botany, Entomology, Genetics, Plant Pathology, Soils, and Zoology. 

Further information may be found in the Graduate School Catalog. 

Opportunities — Agriculture is a broad field with fascinating new oppor- 
tunities. It needs trained persons to process and distribute agricultural pro- 
ducts, to give special services to people who actually produce these 
products, and to do research and teaching that will make our agricultural 
production and distribution even more efficient. 

The eight major fields of agriculture-research, industry, business, edu- 
cation, communications, conservation, services, as well as farming and 
ranching — need 15,000 college graduates each year in the United States. 
But at present our colleges are graduating only about 7,000 a year trained 
for these jobs. This leaves more than two jobs for each graduate. 

In North Carolina alone, there is a desperate need for college-trained 
people to farm their own land, and for well-schooled specialists in the 
fertilizer, dairy, feed, insecticide, farm implement and distribution in- 
dustries. These industries put graduates in key positions and call for 
more than State College can supply. 

Some of the opportunities in the eight fields of agriculture are as fol- 
lows: 

Research-production, marketing, engineering, processing, conservation, 
reclamation, etc. 

Industry-machinery and equipment, chemicals, food processing, grain 
and seed processing, meat and poultry packing, etc. 

Business-banking and credit, insurance, farm management, land apprai- 
sal, marketing, transportation, etc. 

Education-vocational agriculture, agricultural extension, college instruc- 
tion, governmental agencies, etc. 

Communications-writing, reporting, radio, television, newspapers, mag- 
azines, advertising, publications, etc. 

Conservation-soil, water, range, forest, fish, wildlife, parks, turf, etc. 

Services-inspection and regulation, production field service, quality con- 
trol and grading, agricultural technicians and consultants, etc. 

Farming and ranching-general, dairy, swine, beef, sheep, poultry, cot- 
ton, forage, grain, fruits, tobacco, etc. 

Practically all types of occupations — more than 500 of them — are avail- 
able to a graduate in agriculture. There are many opportunities in tech- 



38 



School Of Agriculture 



nology, science, and business. The School of Agriculture stands ready to 
help meet the challenge of the new concept of agriculture with forward- 
looking curricula. 

The departments in the School of Agriculture have a common freshman 
year with the exception of the Department of Agricultural Engineering. 
For the agricultural engineering freshman year see section on agricultural 
engineering. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

AG 103, Introduction to Agriculture 1 
ENG 111, Composition 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 

or 
MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 4-5 
HI 261, U. S. in Western Civilization 3 
BO 103, General Botany 4 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 

MS 101, Military Science 



AS 121, Air Science 



Spring Semester 

ENG 112, Composition 
MA 112, Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus 



Credits 



17-18 



MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus 4 

PS 201, American Governmental System 3 
ZO 103, General Zoology 4 

PE 102, Physical Education 1 

MS 102, Military Science 

or 
AS 122, Air Science 1 



AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS CURRICULUM 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 4 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 3 

RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

EC 201, Economics 3 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 

AS 221, Air Science 1 



Fall Semester 
Group B Electives 
Group A or C Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

ML, Modern Language Elective 

or 
ENG, English Elective 
AGC 212, Economics of Agriculture 
PY 221, College Physics 

Group D Elective 
PE 202, Physical Education 
MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 



Credits 



16 



JUNIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


6 
3 
6 


Group B Electives 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 


6 
6 
3 


3 








15 



IS 



Fall Semester 
Group B Electives 
Group A or C Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 



SENIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


6 
2 
7 
3 


Group B Electives 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 


6 
7 
3 



IS 



16 



School Of Agriculture 



39 



AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ML Modern Language Elective 

or 
ENG, English Elective 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 

or 
CH 201, General Inorganic Chemistry 4-5 
PY 211, General Physics* 4 

Group D Elective 3 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 

MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 1 



Spring Semester 

ML, Modern Language Elective 



Credits 



16-17 



ENG, English Elective 3 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chem- 
istry or 
CH 203, General and Organic 

Chemistry 4 

PY 212, General Physics* 4 

Group D Elective 3 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 

MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 1 



Fall Semester 
Group A Elective 
Group D Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 



JUNIOR 


If EAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


5 
3 
6 
3 


Group A, B, or C Elective 
Group D Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 


3 
3 
7 
3 



17 



16 



Fall Semester 

Group A Elective 

Group A, B, or C Elective 

Departmental Requirement 

Free Elective 



SENIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 
3 
7 
3 


Group A Elective 
Group D Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 


6 
3 
6 
3 



17 



18 



'Physics 221 substituted for 211-212 in some agricultural programs. 



AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 
CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 4 

PY 221, General Physics 5 

EC 201, Economics 3 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 

AS 221, Air Science 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

SOI 200, Soils 4 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chem- 
istry or 
CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 
AGC 212, Economics of Agriculture 3 
RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 

MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Modern Language Elective 

or 
English Elective 
Group D Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Group C Elective 
Free Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 
Group A Elective 
Group D Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 



is 



40 



Fall Semester 
Group A or B Elective 
Group C Elective 
Departmental Requirement 
Free Elective 



School Of Agriculture 
senior year 

Credit* Spring Semester 

6 Group C Elective 

3 Departmental Requirement 

7 Free Elective 



Credits 
6 
7 
3 

16 



CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION 

Agricultural Agricultural 

Business Science 

Language 12 . 12 

Social Science and Humanities (Group D*) 21 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 26 28 
Restricted Electives: 

Group B 24 Group A** ...26 

Group A and C 6 

Introduction to Agriculture 1 Introduction to 

Agriculture ... .1 

Departmental Requirements 26 26 

Free Electives 12 12 



Physical Education 
PE 101, 102, 201. 202 

Military Science I and II 
MS 101. 102. 201. 202 
or 

Air Science I and II 
AS 121, 122, 221, 222 



126 
4 



Agricultural 
Technology 

12 

21 



Group A, B .9-11 
Group C .... 9-12 
Introduction to 
Agriculture ... .1 
27 
12 

126 
4 



GROUP ELECTIVES 



GROUP A 

Physical Sciences 

Chemistry 

CH 103 
CH 203 
CH 205 
CH 211, 212, 215 

Geology 

MIG 120 
MIG 222 
MIG 323 
MIG 330 
MIG 442 

Mathematics 
MA 201 
MA 202 
MA 211. 212 
MA 215 

Physics 

PY 202 or 212 
PY 223 



General and Qualitative Chemistry 
General and Organic Chemistry 
General and Qualitative Chemistry 
Quantitative Analysis 
All courses at 400 level and above 



Physical Geology 
Historical Geology 
Paleontology 
Mineralogy 
Petrology 



Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 
Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 
Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 
Finite Mathematics 
All courses at 400 level and above 



General Physics 

Astronomy and Astrophysics 

All courses at 300 level and above 



•Group A includes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and business 

management; Group C, applied science and technology; and Group D, social sciences and 

humanities. 

•*Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. Social Science majors may select from 

Group D. 



School Of Agriculture 



41 



Soils 

SOI 200 
SOI 302 
SOI 452 
SOI 511 
SOI 521 
SOI 551 

Statistics 

ST 302 
ST 311 
ST 361, S62 



Soils 

Soils and Plant Growth 

Soil Classification 

Soil Physics 

Soil Chemistry 

Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification 



Statistical Laboratory 

Introduction to Statistics 

Introduction to Statistics for Engineers I, II 

All courses at 600 level 



Biological Sciences 

Agricultural Engineering 
AGE 303 



Energy Conversion for Agricultural Production 



Animal 1 


ndustry 


AI : 
AI 1 
AI i 


J 12 
501 
502 


Bacteriology 


BO 


312 


Itotany 




BO 
BO 
BO 
BO 
BO 


211, 212 
403 
410 
421 

441 


Dairy Manufacturing 


DM 
DM 
DM 


407 
506 
503 


Entomology 


ENT 301 
ENT 312 


Genetics 




GN 
GN 
GN 
GN 


301 
411 
512 
513 


Plant Pathology 


PP 
PP 
PP 
PP 
PP 


315 

318 

500 

501A 

601B 


Poultry 
PO 
PO 
PO 


401 

521 
522 


Zoology 




ZO 
ZO 
ZO 
ZO 
ZO 
ZO 
ZO 


212 
213 
223 
262 
301 
315 
452 



Principles of Livestock Nutrition 
Physiology of Domestic Animals 
Reproduction and Lactation 



General Bacteriology 



Dendrology 

Systematic Botany 

Plant Histology and Microtechnique 

Plant Physiology 

Plant Ecology 

All courses at 500 level 



Dairy Bacteriology I 
Dairy Bacteriology II 
Dairy Chemistry 



Introduction to Forest Insects 
Economic Enotomology 
All courses at 500 level 



Genetics in Human Affairs 
Principles of Genetics 
Genetics 
Cytogenetics I 



Plant Diseases 

Diseases of Forest Trees 

Advanced Plant Pathology 

Advanced Plant Pathology Lab, Field Crop Diseases 

Advanced Plant Pathology Lab, Horticulture Crop Diseases 



Poultry Diseases 
Poultry Nutrition 
Endocrinology of the Fowl 



Human Anatomy 

Human Physiology 

Comparative Anatomy 

Ornithology 

Animal Physiology 

Animal Parasitology 

Animal Microtechnique 

All courses at 500 level except ZO 621, 661 and 552 which appear 

in Group C, 



Other courses in the Physical and Biological Sciences not presently listed may be elected 
upon approval of the Director of Instruction. 



42 



School Of Agriculture 



GROUP B 

Economics and Business Management 

Students in the agricultural business curriculum are to choose certain 
of their courses from very restricted lists, in order that fundamental 
grounding in each area be assured. Specifically, one course is to be taken 
from Group 1, one course from Group 2, and two courses from Group 3. 
Courses in these groups also appear in the broader and more inclusive 
lists, Group 4 and Group 5. Three courses are to be taken from Group 4 
and one course from Group 5 which were not elected from Groups 1, 2 and 3. 



Group 1 

EC 312 
EC 407 
EC 425 

Group t 

AGC 303 
AGC 311 
AGC 413 
AGC 521 
AGC 523 

Group S 

AGC 431 
AGC 533 
AGC 551 
AGC 552 
EC 302 
EC 310 
EC 442 

Group U 

AGC 322 

EC 315 

EC 401, 402 

EC 408 

EC 409 

EC 411 

EC 412 

EC 414 

EC 415 

EC 420 

EC 426 

EC 431 

EC 432 

EC 504, 505 

EC 515 

EC 525 



Group 5 



EC 410 
EC 413 
EC 440 
EC 448 
EC 450 
EC 455 



Accounting for Engineers 
Business Law I 
Industrial Management 



Farm Management I 

Marketing Agricultural Products (or equiv.) 

Farm Appraisal and Finance 

Economics of Agricultural Marketing 

Farm Management II 



Introduction to Agricultural Prices 

Agricultural Policy 

Agricultural Production Economics 

Consumption, Distribution and Prices in Agriculture 

National Income and Economic Welfare 

Economics of the Firm 

Economic Forecasting 

All courses listed in Group 1 or Group 2 

Organization and Management of Cooperatives 

Salesmanship 

Principles of Accounting 

Business Law II 

Introduction to Production Costs 

Marketing Methods 

Sales Management 

Tax Accounting 

Advertising 

Corporation Finance 

Personnel Management 

Labor Problems 

Industrial Relations 

Principles of Cost Accounting 

Investments 

Management Policy and Decision Making 

All courses listed in Group 3 

Industry Studies 

Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 

Economics of Growth 

International Economics 

Economic Decision Processes 

Econometrics 



GROUP C 



Applied Science and Technology 

Agriculture 
AG 301 
AG 401 



Agricultural Engineering 
AGE 201 
AGE 202 
AGE 211 
AGE 321 
AGE 332 
AGE 341 



Agencies and Programs for Agriculture 
Principles and Methods of Extension Education 



Farm Shop Woodwork 
Farm Shop Metalwork 
Farm Power & Machinery I 
Irrigation, Drainage and Terracing 
Farm Bldg. and Crop Processing 
Farm Electrification and Utilities 



School Of Agriculture 



43 



Animal Industry 
AI 201 
AI 202 
AI 301 
AI 303 
AI 307 
AI 309 
AI 404 
AI 407 
AI 503 
AI 505 

Dairy Manufacturing 
DM 401 
DM 400 

Entomology 

ENT 322 

Field Crops 
FC 211 
FC 311 
FC 312 
FC 412 
FC 413 
FC 414 
FC 511 

Horticulture 
HRT 201 
HRT 301 
HRT 342 
HRT 351 
HRT 421 
HRT 432 
HRT 441, 442 
HRT 471 
HRT 481 

Poultry 

PO 201 
PO 301 
PO 351 
PO 402 
PO 404 
PO 520 



Elem. Dairy Science 

Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 

Grading and Selecting Meat Animals 

Meat and Meat Products 

Advanced Selection & Evaluation of Livestock 

Meat Selection 

Dairy Farm Problems 

Advanced Livestock Production 

Animal Breeding 

Diseases of Farm Animals 



Mktg. Milk and Related Products 
Plant Experience 



Beekeeping 



Field Crops I 

Field Crops II 

Pastures and Forage Crops 

Advanced Pastures and Forage Crops 

Plant Breeding 

Weeds and Their Control 

Tobacco Technology 



Principles of Horticulture 

Plant Propagation 

Landscape Gardening 

Greenhouse Management 

Fruit Production 

Vegetable Production 

Floriculture 

Arboriculture 

Breeding of Horticulture Plants 



Poultry Production 

Poultry Quality Evaluation 

Poultry Grading 

Commercial Poultry Enterprises 

Poultry Products 

Poultry Breeding 



Sot/a 



SOI 341 
SOI 461 



Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

Soil Conservation and Management 



Zoology 

ZO 312 
ZO 321 
ZO 521 
ZO 551. 552 



Principles of Game Management 

Wildlife and Natural Resource Conservation 

Fishery Biology 

Wildlife Management 



GROUP C ELECTIVES IN OTHER SCHOOLS 



Engineering 
EM 341 
EM 342 
EM 343 
EE 341 
IE 334 
MIM 321 

Forestry 

FOR 311 
FOR 402 

Psychology 

PSY 337 



Mechanics A (Statics) 
Mechanics B (Dynamics) 
Strength of Materials A 
Industrial Electricity 
Motion and Time Study 
Metallurgy 



Principles of Farm Forestry 
Foundations of Forest Management 



Industrial Psychology I 



Other courses in the Applied Science and Technology not presently listed may be elected 
upon approval of the Director of Instruction. 



44 



School Of Agriculture 



GROUP D 

Social Science and Humanities 



Agricultural Economies 

AGC 212 
AGC 601 
AGC 512 

Economics 

EC 201. 202 

EC 436 

EC 442 
EC 444 

EC 501 

EC 502 

EC 510 

EC 614 

EC 519 

EC 540 

EC 548 

EC 550 

EC 655 



History 



HI 201 
HI 202 
HI 205 
HI 225. 226 
HI 251 
HI 252 
HI 261 



Political Science 



PS 201 
PS 202 
PS 301 
PS 302 



Philosophy and Religion 

PHI 201 
PHI 203 
PHI 206 
REL 301 
REL 302 
REL 303 
PHI 306 
PHI 306 
PHI 309 
PHI 311 
PHI 395 



Psychology 

PSY 200 
PSY 201 
PSY 302 
PSY 304 
PSY 307 

PSY 476 
PSY 490 
PSY 511 
PSY 665 

Rural Sociology 

RS 301 
RS 321 
RS 322 
RS 441 
RS 442 



Economics of Agriculture 

Intermediate Agricultural Economics Theory 

Land Economics 



Economics 

Economic Fluctuations 

Evolution of Economic Ideas 

Economic Systems 

Intermediate Economic Theory 

Money, Income and Employment 

Public Finance 

International Economics 

Monetary Theory 

Economic Growth and Development 

Economics of Welfare 

Mathematical Models in Economics 

Introduction to Linear Programming 



The Ancient World 

The Medieval World 

The Modern Western World 

Modern Europe 

The United States to 1865 

The United States since 1866 

The United States in Western Civilization 

All courses at 300 level and above 



The American Governmental System 
County and Municipal Government 
Comparative Political Systems 
Contemporary World Politics 
All courses at 400 level and above 



Logic 

Effective Living 

Problems and Types of Philosophy 

Religious Groups and Trends in the United States 

The Bible and Its Background 

Christian Ethics 

Philosophy of Religion 

Philosophy of Art 

Marriage and Family Living 

Parent-Child Relationships 

Philosophical Analysis 

All courses at 400 level and above 



Introduction to Psychology 

Elementary Experimental Psychology 

Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 

Educational Psychology 

General Applied Psychology 

All courses at 400 level and above including: 

Psychology of Adolescence 

Social Psychology 

Advanced Social Psychology 

Industrial Management Psychology 



Sociology of Rural Life 
Introduction to Social Research 
Introduction to Rural Social Work 
Rural Social Pathology 
Rural Social Structure 



School Of Agriculture 45 

Sociology and Anthropoloyy 



ANT 206 




People of the World 


ANT 261 




The Study of Man 


ANT 262 




Cultural Anthropology 


SOC 111. 


112 


The American Way of Life 


SOC 202 




Man and Society (General Sociology) 


SOC 301 




Human Behavior 


SOC 302 




Public Relations and Modern Society 


SOC 303 




Current Social Problems 


SOC 804 




Contemporary Family Life 


SOC 806 




Race Relations 


SOC 306 




Delinquency and Crime 

All courses at 400 level and above 


Social Studies 






SS 301, 302 


Contemporary Civilization 


SS 491, 492 


Contemporary Issues 



Other courses in the Social Sciences and Humanities not presently listed my be elected 
upon approval of the Director of Instruction. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



Professor C. E. Bishop, Head of the Department 

Professors H. Brooks James, Richard A. King, James G. Maddox, Walter H. 

Pierce, George S. Tolley, William D. Toussaint 
Associate Professors Arthur Coutu, William R. Henry, Quentin W. Lindsey, 

James A. Seagraves, Anthony P. Stemberger, James C. Williamson, Jr. 
Assistant Professors Dale M. Hoover, Loren A. Ihnen, Richard L. Simmons, 

John F. Stallsteimer, T. Dudley Wallace 
Instructors R. Charles Brooks, Garnett L. Bradford, Adger B. Carroll, 

Walter L. Fishel, Robert M. Ray, T. Kelley White, Jr. 



Objectives — The Department of Agricultural Economics offers programs 
of study leading to the Bachelor of Science, Master of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Three options are available to undergraduate students majoring in 
agricultural economics. These options include agricultural business, agri- 
cultural science, and agricultural technology. Students are given training 
in all aspects of organizing and operating agricultural business firms. A 
sound foundation in basic economic principles in production and market- 
ing is provided in order that graduates will be able to deal with prob- 
lems associated with the rapid changes in technical and economic condi- 
tions. 

The general objectives of the department are as follows: 

(1) To train students to make sound decisions in organizing and man- 
aging farms and other agricultural businesses. 

(2) To train students in the fundamentals of business organization. 

(3) To provide an understanding of the relation of agriculture to oth- 
er parts of the economy and how to evaluate agricultural policy and eco- 
nomic changes which affect agriculture. 

(4) To train graduate students in advanced economic theory and re- 
search techniques. 



46 School Of Agriculture 

Opportunities — Training in agricultural economics qualifies a student 
for a wide range of opportunities. Many graduates of the department 
are employed in research and education work by various agencies of the 
federal and state governments. These agencies include the Agricultural 
Extension Service, the Agricultural Experiment Station, the State De- 
partment of Agriculture, and other agencies of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

The growing number of companies processing and manufacturing agri- 
cultural products has created an increasing demand for people trained in 
agricultural economics. Opportunities here include employment by com- 
panies handling farm supplies such as feed, fertilizer, and equipment; gen- 
eral marketing and processing firms; agricultural cooperatives; profes- 
sional farm management agencies, and various credit agencies. 

Openings in all of these areas greatly exceed the number of graduates 
trained to fill them. And as industrial and agricultural development of 
the region continues, employment opportunities are expected to increase. 

Facilities — The department has a modern and well equipped library, 
including all of the major professional journals and USDA publications. 
Experiment station publications from other institutions throughout the 
United States are kept on file. Modern computational and reproduction 
equipment is available. In addition, the department has access to coopera- 
tive use of IBM equipment in the Department of Experimental Statistics, 
including a 650 digital computer and a Rand 1105 computer. The depart- 
ment is housed in Patterson Hall. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in Agricultural Economics may be earned under any of the three 
general curricula in the School of Agriculture. In addition, students must 
meet all of the basic requirements of the college and the School of Agri- 
culture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements for the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

Credit* 

AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 3 

AGC 551, Agricultural Production Economics 3 

AGC 552, Consumption, Distribution and Prices In Agriculture 8 

EC 302, National Income and Economic Welfare 3 
EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 

or 

EC 401, Principles of Accounting 3 

EC 407, Business Law I 3 

Electives 6 

GROUP A AND C COURSES (6 Credits) 

CH 103, General and Qualitative Chemistry 

or 
CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 

Electives 2 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms 3 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics 8 

AGC 533, Agricultural Policy 3 
AGC 521, Procurement, Processing and Distribution of Agricultural Products 

or 

AGC 523, Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 8 

Electives 14 



School Of Agriculture 47 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

MA 211 and 212, Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 



Credit* 



MA 201 and 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II and III 6 or 8 

Electives 18 or 20 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 



Credit* 



AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms 

AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 3 

(or equivalent) 
AGC 533, Agricultural Policy 3 

AGC 651, Agricultural Production Economics 3 

AGC 552, Consumption, Distribution, and Prices in Agriculture 3 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics 8 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 

or 
EC 401, Principles of Accounting 3 

Electives 5 



Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows: 



GROUP A AND B COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 
AGC 521, Procurement, Processing asd Distribution of Agricultural Products 

or 
AGC 523, Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 3 

Electives 6-9 

GROUP C COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Electives 9-12 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms 3 

AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 8 

(or equivalent) 

AGC 533, Agricultural Policy 3 

AGC 551, Agricultural Production Economics 3 

AGC 552, Consumption, Distribution, and Prices in Agriculture 3 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics 3 
EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 

or 

EC 401, Principles of Accounting 3 

Electives 6 

Graduate Study — The Department of Agricultural Economics offers 
programs of study leading to the Master of Agricultural Economics, the 
Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Special emphasis is placed on the economics of agricultural production 
and marketing, analysis of programs and policies affecting agriculture, 
and statistical techniques which can be used in solving agricultural prob- 
lems. 



48 School Of Agriculture 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of the Department 

Professors J. M. Fore, G. Wallace Giles*, David S. Weaver, John W. Weaver, 
Jr. 

Associate Professors H. D. Bowen, Ezra L. Howell, Jan van Schilfgaarde, 
W. E. Splinter 

Assistant Professors George B. Blum, Jr., K. A. Jordan, C. W. Suggs 

Instructors E. 0. Beasley, J. F. Beeman, Thomas H. Garner, W. H. John- 
son, J. I. Sewell, R. W. Watkins, Edward H. Wiser, F. Scott Wright 

Head Mechanic Ralph B. Greene 



Objectives — Students in agricultural engineering are educated and trained 
to deal with the problems of agriculture that are engineering in nature. 
Involved are the application of scientific and engineering principles to 
the conservation and utilization of water and soil, the development of 
power and labor-saving devices for all phases of agricultural production, 
the design of structures and equipment for housing and handling livestock 
and field products, and the processing and marketing of farm products. 

The need for men to carry out the technical aspects such as develop- 
ment and research as well as less technical work, such as sales and serv- 
ice of farm equipment requires the offering of two distinct curricula as 
described below. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering is housed in the Agricul- 
tural Engineering Building. 

Opportunities — Men trained in agricultural engineering under the 
science curriculum are qualified for positions in design, development and 
research in public institutions and in industry, and for teaching and ex- 
tension work in institutions of higher education. The curriculum also pro- 
vides adequate training for postgraduate work leading to advanced de- 
grees. 

Men trained in the field of agricultural engineering technology are 
qualified for positions in sales and service of agricultural equipment such 
as farm machinery, irrigation systems, and so forth; as county agents or 
farmers; and for farm advisory work with such organizations as electric 
power companies. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Agricultural Science — This curriculum, of- 
fered in conjunction with the School of Engineering, is designed to develop 
young men capable of engineering leadership in agriculture. Emphasis is 
placed on basic science courses such as mathematics, physics, mechanics, 
biology, soils, and thermodynamics, which provide a sound background for 
engineering and agricultural technology. Courses in agricultural engi- 
neering are directed to those methods of thought and techniques whereby 
science can be applied with understanding and judgment to engineering 
situations in agricultural operations. General agriculture courses are pro- 
vided in order that the student can better understand the agricultural in- 
dustry with which he deals. 



*0n leave 1961 



School Of Agriculture 



49 



Since agricultural engineering involves two distinct technical fields — 
agriculture and engineering — this curriculum is a joint responsibility of 
the two schools and is so administered. 



YEARLY COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



*nd Calculus I 



FRESHMAN 

ENG 111, 112, English Composition 

MA 101, 102, Algebra and Trigonometry; Analytic Geometry 

AG 103, Introduction to Agriculture 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 

AGE 151, 152. Farm Mechanics 

ME 101, 102, Engineering Graphics I, II 

MS 101, 102, Military Science 

or 
AS 121, 122. Air Science 
PE 101, 102, Pbvsical Education 



SOPHOMORE 

EM 311. Mechanics I 

CH 203. General and Organic Chemistry 

CE 201, Surveying I 

AGE 211, Farm Power and Machinery 

MA 201, 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II and III 

PY 201, 202, General Physics 

MS 201, 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 221. 222, Air Science 
PE 201, 202, Physical Education 



JUNIOR 

BO 103, General Botany- 
EC 201, Economics 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical Engineering 
EM 312, Mechanics II 
EM 321. Strength of Materials I 
EM 430, Fluid Mechanics 
ENG 231. Basic Speaking Skills 
ME 301, Engineering Thermodynamics I 
MA 301, Differential Equations 
SOI 200, Soils 

English Elective 

Electives 



SENIOR 

HI 261, The United States in Western Civilization 
AGC 212, Economics of Agriculture 

or 
AGC 551, Agricultural Production Economics 
AGE 371, Soil and Water Conservation Engineering 
AGE 451, Curing and Drying of Farm Crops 
AGE 452, Senior Seminar 
AGE 462, Farm Power and Machinery IIA 
AGE 481, Farm Structures 
AGE 491. Rural Electrification 

AGE 552, Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing 
PS 201. The American Governmental System 
RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 

Humanities Elective 

Electives 



ST S61, Introduction to Statistics for Engineers, and PY 40" 
Physic?, are recommended for electives. 



Introduction 



Credit* 
6 
9 

1 
4 
4 
4 



2 
2 

32 

Credit* 
3 
4 
3 
3 
8 
10 



2 

2 

35 

Credit* 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
6 

41 



Credit* 
3 
3 

4 

2 

1 
4 
4 
4 
1 
3 
3 
3 
6 

41 

to Modern 



50 School Of Agriculture 

Agricultural Engineering Technology — This curriculum is designed for 
those who are working on a practical level with farm people. Graduates are 
equipped to apply to the farm the new technology as developed and revealed 
by the research engineer. The courses are presented and directed toward 
the solution of consumer problems with emphasis on the techniques em- 
ployed. The requirements of the agricultural engineering technology cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

Freshman year is the same as listed above in agricultural science curriculum. 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (11 Credits) 

Credits 
MA 201, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

PY 212, General Physics 4 

Electives 3 

GROUP C COURSES (10 Credits) 

EM 341, Mechanics (Statics) A 2 

EM 342, Mechanics (Dynamics) B 2 

AI 201, Elementary Dairy Science 

AI 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 

FC 211, Field Crops I 

FC 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 6 

FC 414, Weeds and Their Control 

HRT 222, Introduction to Horticulture 

PO 201, Poultry Production 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

AGE 151, 152, Farm Mechanics 4 

AGE 211, Farm Power and Machinery 3 

AGE 321, Irrigation, Terracing and Drainage 3 

AGE 411, Farm Power and Machinery IIB 3 

AGE 332, Farm Buildings and Crop Processing 3 

AGE 341, Farm Electrification and Utilities 3 

AGE 452, Seminar 1 

ME 101, 102, Engineering Graphics I, II 4 

CE 201, Survey I 3 

The following courses, listed as optional in the basic agricultural technology curriculum, 
are required : 

MA 101, 102, Algebra and Trigonometry ; Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 
CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 



Graduate Study — The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers 
advanced study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in any one of 
five fields of specialization. Power and machinery, rural structures, soil 
and water conservation, rural electrification, or agricultural processing. 

The Master of Science program in agricultural engineering provides a 
broad background in science and engineering through advanced study in 
mathematics and physics. 

For those interested primarily in existing technology, a program of 
study for the Master of Agricultural Engineering degree permits selec- 
tions from a variety of advanced application courses. This program pro- 
vides training appropriate for those engaged in the dissemination of in- 
formation either as extension workers with public institutions or service 
representatives for industry. It is not intended as preliminary study to 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 



School Of Agriculture 51 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



Professor George Hyatt, Jr., Head of the Department 

Professors L. W. Aurand, E. R. Barrick, E. G. Batte, T. N. Blumer, J. L. 

Etchells, F. M. Haig, J. E. Legates, Gennard Matrone, W. R. Murley. 

J. C. Osborne, W. M. Roberts, M. L. Speck, H. A. Stewart, W. E. Thomas, 

S. B. Tove, L. C. Ulberg, G. H. Wise 
Associate Professors T. A. Bell, E. U. Dillard, Lemuel Goode, J. G. Leece, 

H. A. Ramsey, R. B. Redfern, F. H. Smith, F. G. Warren 
Assistant Professors A. J. Clawson, J. P. Everett, J. J. McNeill, R. D. 

Mochrie, J. L. Moore, R. M. Myers, 0. W. Robinson, W. W. G. Smart, Jr., 

M. B. Wise 
Instructors C. W. Alliston, H. B. Craig, C. W. Dill, G. L. Ellis, J. H. 

Gregory, J. M. Leatherwood, J. W. Smith, D. G. Spruill 



Objectives — The Department of Animal Industry has the responsibility 
for training students in the field of dairy and livestock production and 
processing. To accomplish this aim, the department offers three majors — 
animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, and dairy manufacturing — in each of 
the three curricula in the School of Agriculture. 

Because of the new and broadened concept of agriculture, more job 
opportunities are provided in Animal Industry for students of varying 
backgrounds. Farm experience is beneficial for certain fields of animal 
industry, however, it is not essential for others. Members of the staff of 
the Department of Animal Industry will be glad to assist in planning 
summer work programs for students. 

Plans have been initiated to offer in the near future, an undergraduate 
program for a major in animal nutrition in the agricultural science cur- 
riculum. 

The Department of Animal Industry is housed in Polk Hall. 

Opportunities — There are many and varied opportunities for students 
who major in any of the animal industry programs to enter the produc- 
tion, processing and marketing fields. The main opportunities in each 
major are as follows: 

Animal Husbandry — Agricultural extension and other educational work, 
feed consulting and sales work, livestock management, livestock breed 
promotion, livestock equipment sales, meat packing and processing, animal 
by-product manufacture and distribution, research and development, mar- 
keting livestock and livestock products, animal nutrition and animal 
breeding. 

Dairy Husbandry — Agricultural extension and other educational work, 
feed consulting and sales work, dairy herd management, dairy breed pro- 
motion, dairy equipment sales, research and development, marketing dairy 
cattle and dairy products, dairy field work, dairy cattle nutrition, and 
dairy cattle breeding. 

Dairy Manufacturing — Dairy products sales, procurement of dairy prod- 
ucts, processing dairy products, dairy plant management, dairy plant ac- 
counting, dairy supplies and equipment sales, quality control of dairy pro- 



52 School Of Agriculture 

ducts, government (state or federal) inspection and control of dairy pro- 
ducts and research and development. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Animal Husbandry — The degree of Bache- 
lor of Science with a major in animal husbandry may be obtained under 
any of the three curricula offered by the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

Credits 

Electives 24 

GROUP A COURSES (6 Credits) 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AI 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

AI 303, Meat and Meat Products 3 

AI 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

One of the following: 
AI 401, Beef Cattle Production 
AI 402, Sheep Production 

AI 403, Pork Production 3 

Elective 1 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 



Credits 



BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

♦Electives 13 

•Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AI 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

AI 303, Meat and Meat Products 3 

AI 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

AI 502, Reproduction and Lactation 4 

AI 503 (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 8 

A I 505, Animal Diseases 3 

One of the following: 
AI 401, Beef Cattle Production 
AI 402, Sheep Production 

AI 403, Pork Production 3 

Elective 2 

Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (10 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 



School Of Agriculture 53 

GROUP C COURSES (11 Credits) 

Credit* 
Electives 11 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

AI 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

AI 801, Grading and Selecting Meat Animals 2 

AI 303, Meat and Meat Products 3 

AI 812, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 8 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

AI 503, (GN 503 1, Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 

CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

One of the following: 
AI 401, Beef Cattle Production 
AI 402, Sheep Production 

AI 403, Pork Production 3 

Elective 1 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Dairy Husbandry — The degree of Bachelor 
of Science with a major in dairy husbandry may be obtained under any of 
the three curricula offered by the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 24 

GROUP A COURSES (6 CREDITS) 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 8 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

AI 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 3 

BO 312, Genera! Bacteriology 4 

AI 404, Dairy Farm Problems 3 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

AI 502, Reproduction and Lactation 4 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

Credits 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 3 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

•Electives 17 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

AI 305, Selecting Dairy Cattle 2 

AI 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 
BO 312. General Bacteriology 
AI 404, Dairy Farm Problems 
AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 
AI 502, Reproduction and Lactation 

A I 503 (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 

Elective 2 

•Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 



54 School Of Agriculture 

Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows: 



GROUP A AND B COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 8 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

Electives 0-3 



GROUP C COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Electives 9-12 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

AI 305, Selecting Dairy Cattle 2 

AI 312, Principles of Livestock Nutrition 8 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

AI 404, Dairy Farm Problems 3 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

AI 502, Reproduction and Lactation 4 

AI 503, (GN 503), Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3 

Electives 8 



Undergraduate Curriculum — Dairy Manufacturing — The degree of Bache- 
lor of Science with a major in dairy manufacturing may be obtained under 
any of the three curricula offered by the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 



GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 24 



GROUP A AND C COURSES (6 Credits) 

CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 
Elective 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

DM 401, Market Milk and Related Products 3 

DM 407, Dairy Bacteriology I 4 

DM 501, Advanced Dairy Technology 3 

DM 504, Dairy Plant Management 4 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

One of the following : 
DM 402, Cheese 

DM 403, Ice Cream and Related Frozen Dairy Foods 

DM 404, Butter and Dairy By-Products 3 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



School Of Agriculture 55 



GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 



Credit* 



BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

DM 407, Dairy Bacteriology I 4 

DM 606, Dairy Bacteriology II 3 

DM 608, Dairy Chemistry 3 

Electives from Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics 12 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 



Credits 



AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

DM 401, Market Milk and Related Product* 3 

DM 601, Advanced Dairy Technology 3 

DM 604, Dairy Plant Management 4 

Two of the following: 
DM 402, Cheese 

DM 403, Ice Cream and Related Frozen Dairy Foods 

DM 404, Butter and Dairy By-Products 6 

Electives 6 



Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows: 



GROUP A AND B COURSES (11 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

DM 407, Dairy Bacteriology I 4 

Electives 3 



GROUP C COURSES (10 Credits) 

AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

Electives 6 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

AI 406, Animal Industry Seminar 1 

DM 401, Market Milk and Related Products 3 

DM 601, Advanced Dairy Technology 3 

DM 604, Dairy Plant Management 4 

DM 506^ Dairy Bacteriology II 3 

Two of the following : 
DM 402, Cheese 

DM 403, Ice Cream and Related Frozen Dairy Foods 

DM 404, Butter and Dairy By-Products 6 

Electives 7 

Graduate Study — The Department of Animal Industry offers the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in animal industry and in 
dairy manufacturing. The degrees in animal industry provide for major 
programs of work in the fields of animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, animal 
nutrition, animal diseases, animal physiology, and animal breeding. 



AGRONOMY 

See Field Crops and Soils 



56 School Of Agriculture 

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 



Professor H. T. Scofield, Head of the Department 
Professors E. A. Ball, H. J. Evans, J. B. Evans, L. A. Whitford 
Associate Professor E. 0. Beal 

Assistant Professors A. W. Cooper, G. H. Elkan, J. W. Hardin, Heinz 
Seltmann, J. R. Troyer 

Objectives — The course program in the department has the objective of 
providing undergraduate and graduate instruction in the various specialized 
phases of basic plant science including microbiology. Undergraduates 
majoring in the department are usually oriented toward graduate work in 
this or other fields of science. Courses are supplemented by supervised pro- 
grams of research for graduate students studying for Master's or Doctor's 
degrees. Course work in the department also is designed to provide a basis 
for study in the applied sciences in agriculture and forestry. 

Opportunities — Majors in botany and bacteriology may choose to con- 
tinue graduate work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philos- 
ophy degrees in one of the several specialized fields. Majors specializing 
in botany are qualified for many technological positions with various gov- 
ernment institutions or private industries concerned with agriculture. Majors 
specializing in bacteriology find employment opportunities in medical and 
agricultural industry or in the field of public health. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Botany — The Bachelor of Science degree 
with a major in the agricultural science curriculum from the School of 
Agriculture can be obtained in botany. The general requirements of the 
agricultural science curriculum are as follows: 

PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES „ a . 

Credits 

CH 203. General and Organic Chemistry- 4 

GROUP A COURSES 

♦Electives 26 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES 

BO 301, General Morphology jj 

BO 403, Systematic Botany « 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 
BO 441, Plant Ecology 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315 or 318, Plant Diseases, Disease of Forest Trees 3 

BO 312, General Bacteriology * 

Elective 3 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Bacteriology — The department does not offer 
and undergraduate major program in bacteriology. 

Graduate Study — Botany and bacteriology offer work leading to the Mas- 
ter of Science degree in the special fields of plant physiology, ecology, 
anatomy, morphology, bacteriology, and systematic botany. Graduate work 
in preparation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the fields 
of plant physiology, plant ecology, systematic botany, bacteriology and 
morphology. 



•No more than 6 hours of Group A electives may be courses in the Department of Botany 
and Bacteriology. Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 



School Of Agriculture 57 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

See Animal Industry 

DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

See Animal Industry 

ENTOMOLOGY 



Professor Clyde F. Smith, Head of the Department 

Professor T. B. Mitchell 

Associate Professors C. H. Brett, F. E. Guthrie, F. R. Lawson, W. J. Mistric, 

R. L. Rabb, D. A. Young, Jr. 
Assistant Professors W. V. Campbell, M. H. Farrier, R. T. Gast, H. H. 

Neunzig, W. A. Stephen 
Instructor H. B. Moore 



Objectives — The entomology faculty offers instruction at both the under- 
graduate and graduate levels and provides students in this field the broad 
fundamental training necessary in this profession. Undergraduate instruc- 
tion also is designed to provide introductory and terminal courses in insect 
control technology for students majoring in other areas of agriculture and 
forestry. 

The Department of Entomology is housed in Gardner Hall. 

Opportunities — Opportunities for employment of well-trained entomolo- 
gists are plentiful and varied. Research and teaching opportunities exist in 
many state institutions. Federal agencies offer many positions in control 
research and regulatory work. Private industry is using more and more 
entomologists in the development, production, control, testing and sale of 
agricultural chemicals. Other opportunities in entomology as consultants in 
domestic or foreign service as well as in private business and sales are 
available. One can go into business for himself as a pest control operator 
or an insecticide formulator. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in entomology is offered under the agricultural science curriculum 
of the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



58 School Of Agriculture 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

Credits 

SOI 200, Soils 
or 

MIG 120, Geology 4 or 3 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry, or Equivalent 3 

ST 311, Introduction to Statistics 3 
BO 421, Plant Physiology 

or 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 or 3 

ZO 205, Invertebrate Zoology 4 

•Elective 3 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 

or 
ENT 301, General Entomology 3 

ENT 511, Systematic Entomology 3 

Advised electives 14 

Agrciultural Technology — The Departments of Field Crops, Entomology, 
and Plant Pathology offer a joint major in plant protection. See section on 
plant protection for details. 

Graduate Study — The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
are offered in entomology. The work in entomology is well supported by 
strong Departments in Chemistry, Statistics, and the Plant and Animal 
Sciences. 



FIELD CROPS 



Professor P. H. Harvey, Head of the Department 

Professors T. G. Bowery, D. S. Chamblee, D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, 

K. R. Keller, G. C. Klingman, R. L. Loworn, T. J. Mann, G. K. Mid- 

dleton, P. A. Miller, R. P. Moore, J. C. Rice, J. A. Weybrew 
Associate Professors C. A. Brim, G. L. Jones, L. L. Phillips, Luther Shaw, 

D. L. Thompson, R. P. Upchurch. 
Assistant Professors W. A. Cope, J. W. Dudley, D. A. Emery, W. T. Fike, 

P. E. Gatterdam, W. B. Gilbert, H. D. Gross, G. R. Gwynn, R. H. 

Hamilton, J. A. Lee, W. M. Lewis, F. W. McLaughlin, J. R. Mauney, 

D. E. Moreland, C. F. Murphy, J. C. Williams 
Instructors A. J. Crowley, J. L. Hall 



Objectives — The curriculum in field crop has as its objectives training the 
student in the fundamental principles of the plant sciences, along with the 
application of these principles to the problems of crop production. 

The importance of agronomic training in North Carolina agriculture is 
shown by the fact that the state ranks third among the states in cash 
income from farm crops. Yet the maximum potential production of farm 
crops has by no means been reached. With continued improvement in 
varieties, cultural practices and cropping methods, further advances will 



•May be taken from Groups B and C. 



School Of Agriculture 59 

be made. In carrying out this broad program there is, and will continue to 
be, a real need in North Carolina for men well trained in plant breeding, 
crop production and management and related fields. 

The Department of Field Crops is housed in Williams Hall. 

Opportunities — Graduates in field crops are trained to fill positions 
as county extension agents; farm operators and managers; salesmen in 
seed and fertilizer companies and similar commercial concerns; seed 
analysts; and as leaders in various forms of agricultural development work. 
The field crops programs also offer training for those students who might 
want to continue their education with graduate study in preparation for 
extension, teaching or research positions with state or federal institutions 
or private industry. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in field crops can be earned under any of the three curricula in the 
School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 



GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

AGC 303, Organization and Business Management of Farms 



Credits 



AGC 311, Organization and Business Management of Marketing Firms 

AGC 342, Marketing Field Crops 3 

EC 407, Business Law I 3 

Electives 16 

GROUP A AND C COURSES (6 Credits) 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

Elective 3 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

FC 211, Field Crops I 3 

FC 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

FC 414, Weeds and Their Control 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 3 

PP 315, Plant Diseases 3 

SOI 200, Soils 4 
SOI 302, Soils and Plant Growth 

or 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315, Plant Diseases 3 
MA 201, Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 

or 
MA 211, Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 3 or 4 

♦Electives 12 or 13 



•Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 



60 School Of Agriculture 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

Credits 

FC 211, Field Crops I 3 

FC 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

FC 414, Weeds and Their Control 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology * 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 8 

SOI 200, Soils * 
SOI 302, Soils and Plant Growth 

or 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Elective 8 

Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agrciultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315, Plant Diseases 3 

Electives 3-6 

GROUP C COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Electives 9-12 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

FC 211, Field Crops I 3 

FC 311, Field Crops II 3 

FC 312, Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

FC 413, Plant Breeding 3 

FC 414, Weeds and Their Control 3 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 3 
SOI 302, Soils and Plant Growth 

or 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 8 

Electives 2 

The Departments of Field Crops, Entomology, and Plant Pathology offer 
a joint major in plant protection. See section on plant protection for details. 

Graduate Study — The Department of Field Crops offers training leading 
to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the follow- 
ing fields: plant breeding, crop production, forage crop ecology, and weed 
control. 



GENETICS 



Professor H. F. Robinson, Head of the Department 

Professors C. H. Bostian, D. S. Grosh, Ben W. Smith, S. G. Stephens 

Associate Professor D. F. Matzinger 

Assistant Professors T. M. Kelleher, Ken-ichi Kojima, L. E. Mettler, 

R. H. Moll 
Cooperating with the following associate members of the faculty: 
Animal Industry — D. U. Dillard, J. E. Legates, O. W. Robison, H. A. 

Stewart 
Botany — E. O. Beal, James W. Hardin 
Field Crops— P. H. Harvey, C. A. Brim, I. T. Carlson, W. A. Cope, J. W. 

Dudley, D. A. Emery, D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, G. L. Jones, K. R. 



School Of Agriculture 61 

Keller, J. A. Lee, W. M. Lewis, T. J. Mann, G. K. Middleton, P. A. Miller, 
L. L. Phillips, C. L. Rhyne, D. L. Thompson 

Horticulture — F. D. Cochran, G. J. Galletta, F. L. Haynes, W. R. Hender- 
son, D. T. Pope, C. F. Williams 

Plant Pathology— J. L. Apple, Richard Gwyn, T. T. Hebert, E. L. Moore, 
R. R. Nelson, N. N. Winstead 

Poultry— E. W. Glazener, W. L. Blow, G. A. Martin 

Forestry— T. O. Perry, B. J. Zobel 

Statistics — C. Clark Cockerham 



Objectives — The genetics faculty offers instruction at advanced under- 
graduate and graduate levels. The undergraduate courses are designed to 
support the other departments of the institution, giving students a back- 
ground in the science of genetics. The graduate program is designed to 
train scientists for research and teaching careers in basic genetics and in 
its applications in plant and animal breeding. 

The Department of Genetics is housed in Gardner Hall. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The faculty does not have a program lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Graduate Study — Graduate study is carried out under the direction of 
any of the members of the genetics faculty and enables the student to 
qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degree. A 
candidate for the Master's degree must acquire a thorough understanding 
of genetics and its relation to other biological disciplines and must present 
a thesis based upon his own research. In addition to a comprehensive 
knowledge of his field, a candidate for the doctorate must demonstrate his 
capacity for independent investigation and scholarship in genetics. 

The basic aspects of quantitative genetics, cytogenetics, physiological 
genetics and mutation genetics as related to past and future evolution of 
organisms is the central theme of the training program and research. The 
varied but coordinated interests of the genetics faculty with their research 
programs offers a variety of opportunities for graduate student training 
that is found at few other institutions. Experimental studies utilize organ- 
isms ranging from microbes, mice and drosophila to trees and economic 
farm animals. 



HORTICULTURE 

Professor Fred D. Cochran, Head of the Department 

Professors J. L. Etchells, M. E. Gardner, J. H. Harris, F. L. Haynes, Jr., 

J. M. Jenkins, Jr., I. D. Jones, G. 0. Randall, C. F. Williams 
Associate Professors W. E. Ballinger, C. L. McCombs, M. W. Hoover, D. T. 

Pope 
Assistant Professors T. F. Cannon, F. E. Correll, G. J. Galletta, W. R. 

Henderson, C. H. Miller, R. J. Schramm, Jr. 
Instructors T. R. Konsler, V. H. Underwood 



Objectives — The programs in horticulture offer training in basic prin- 
ciples of the plant sciences, along with the application of these principles 



62 School Of Agriculture 

to the production, breeding, handling, marketing and utilization of fruit, 
vegetable and ornamental crops, and also to the processing of fruits and 
vegetables. 

The variations in climatic conditions in Nox'th Carolina are conducive to 
the production of a wide variety of horticultural crops which are distributed 
throughout the state as commercial enterprises and as home gardens. While 
these crops now represent an important segment of agriculture in the state, 
further expansion will be realized with development of adapted varieties, 
mechanization and intensification of cultural practices, improvement of 
handling and marketing methods, and development of the food processing 
industry. 

Opportunities — Graduates in horticulture will find numerous opportuni- 
ties in a wide variety of positions in production, processing, and sales. 
Among these are county extension agents; farm operators, orchard, nurs- 
ery, greenhouse and flower shop managers; research and promotional speci- 
alists with commercial seed, floral, fertilizer, chemical, and food companies 
and processing plants; inspectors and quality control technologists; USD A 
specialists; and as leaders in other phases of agricultural and industrial 
developments. In addition, the student may prepare himself for one of the 
many opportunities for graduate study. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in horticulture can be earned under any of the three curricula 
offered by the School of Agriculture. Under these curricula, specialized 
training is offered for horticulture majors in fruit and vegetable crops and 
in ornamental crops; in addition, specialization in fruit and vegetable pro- 
cessing is offered in the agricultural technology curriculum. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows for specialization in fruit and vegetable crops or 
ornamental crops: 

GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) „ , 

Credit* 

Electives 24 

GROUP A AND C COURSES (6 Credits) 

ENT 312 Economic Entomology 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

CH 103 General and Qualitative Chemistry 4 

SOI 200 Soils 4 



Four courses in Fruit and Vegetable Crops 

HRT 321 Grading, Packing and Inspection of Fruits and 

Vegetables 3 

HRT 421 Fruit Production 3 

HRT 432 Vegetable Production 3 

HRT 451 Principles of Fruit and Vegetable Processing 3 

Electives 6 



School Of Agriculture 63 

Six courses in Ornamental Crops Credits 

HRT 211 212 Ornamental Plants 

HRT 30l' Plant Propagation 

HRT 351, 441, 442 Greenhouse Management; Floriculture 

HRT 342 411, 471 Landscape Gardening; Nursery 

Management; Arboriculture s 

Agricultural Science— The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows for specialization in fruit and vegetable crops and 
ornamental crops: 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) Credit* 

30 312 General Bacteriology 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

CH 203 Organic Chemistry 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 



SOI 200 Soils 

Electives 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

ENT 312 Economic Entomology 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 

Four courses in Fruit and Vegetable Crops 

o 

HRT 421 Fruit Production 

HRT 432 Vegetable Production 

HRT 451 Principles of Fruit and Vegetable Processing 

HRT 562 Post-Harvest Physiology 

Electives 



Four courses in Ornamental Crops 

HRT 211, 212 Ornamental Plants 

HRT 441, 442 Floriculture 

HRT 411, 471 Nursery Management ; Arboriculture 

Electives 8 

Agricultural Technology— The requirements of the agricultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows for specialization in fruit and vegetable crops 
and ornamental crops: 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (10 Credits) Credits 



BO 421 

GN 411 Genetics 

pp 315 Plant Diseases 



Plant Physiology * 

3 



GROUP C COURSES (11 Credits) 

SOI 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

HRT 481 Breeding of Horticultural Plants ■> 

Electives 



64 School Of Agriculture 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 



Credits 



ENT 312 Economic Entomology 3 

Electives 6 



Six courses in Fruit and Vegetable Crops 

AGC 364 Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables 8 

HRT 321 Grading, Packing and Inspection of Fruits and Vegetables 3 

HRT 421 Fruit Production 3 

HRT 432 Vegetable Production 3 

HRT 451 Principles of Fruit and Vegetable Processing 3 

HRT 562 Post-Harvest Physiology 3 



Sis courses in Ornamental Crops 

HRT 211, 212 Ornamental Plants 6 

HRT 301 Plant Propagation 3 

HRT 351, 441, 442 Greenhouse Management; Floriculture I and II 

or 
HRT 342, 411, 471 Landscape Gardening ; Nursery 

Management ; Arboriculture 9 



For specialization in fruit and vegetable processing the following courses 
are required in addition to the basic requirements of the agricultural 
technology curriculum. 



GROUP A AND B COURSES (12 Credits) 

Credits 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

CH 215 Quantitative Analysis 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 



GROUP C COURSES (9 Credits) 

AGE 331 Power, Heating and Refrigeration 3 

HRT 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 

Elective 8 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

BO 312 General Bacteriology 4 

CH 425, 426 Organic Chemistry 6 

HRT 321 Grading, Packing and Inspection of Fruits and 

Vegetables 3 

HRT 451 Principles of Fruit and Vegetable Processing 3 

HRT 462 Grading Processed Fruits and Vegetables 2 

HRT 562 Post-Harvest Physiology 3 

Electives 6 



Graduate Study — The Department of Horticulture offers the Master of 
Science degree and the professional degree, Master of Horticulture. 

The professional degree is designed for those interested in application of 
current knowledge, while the Master of Science degree places emphasis on 
research and provides a basis for later study on the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. 



School Of Agriculture 65 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 



Professor D. E. Ellis, Head of the Department 

Professors C. N. Clayton, F. A. Haasis, T. T. Herbert, A. Kelman, E. L. 

Moore, L. W. Nielsen, C. J. Nusbaum 
Associate Professors J. L. Apple, Robert Aycock, G. B. Lucas, R. R. Nelson, 

L. H. Person, J. N. Sasser, N. N. Winstead 
Assistant Professors W. E. Cooper, Hedwig Triantaphyllou, C. S. Hodges, 

D. M. Kline, N. T. Powell, J. P. Ross, R. T. Sherwood, D. L. Strider 



Objectives — Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to 
provide introductory and advanced courses in the nature and control of 
plant diseases to students majoring in field crops, horticulture, plant pro- 
tection, agricultural education, and forestry, and to provide students with 
the fundamental training necessary for graduate study in plant pathology. 

Opportunities — Many opportunities for employment in research, extension 
and teaching are available to men with advanced degrees in the field of 
plant pathology. Openings are available for qualified men in research in 
the USDA, state experiment stations and in industry. The rapid develop- 
ment of agricultural chemicals and other methods for disease control offer 
numerous opportunities. See plant protection curriculum. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The Plant Pathology Department cooperates 
in the training of plant protection majors (see below), but does not offer 
a major in plant pathology at the undergraduate level. 

Graduate Study — The Department of Plant Pathology offers graduate 
training in all phases of plant pathology leading to the degree of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 



PLANT PROTECTION MAJOR 

The major in plant protection is a joint major in the Departments of 
Entomology, Field Crops, and Plant Pathology. 

Objectives — Students in plant protection will be trained in the applica- 
tion of chemical and biological principles for the control of plant diseases, 
insects, and weeds. Crop losses from insects, weeds, and diseases for the 
past several years have been estimated in excess of 10 billion dollars 
annually in the United States. A knowledge of the organisms to be con- 
trolled, the products to be used and the crops to be grown is basic to any 
control or regulatory program. 

Opportunities — Opportunities in plant protection basically involve im- 
proving farm efficiency to meet our ever-growing need for food and fiber. 
About 340 chemical companies are concerned with manufacturing and 
formulating products for pest control. Technically trained men are needed 
for sales development and promotion of agricultural chemicals. Graduates 
are also trained to fill positions as county extension agents or as state 
and federal regulatory agents. This major is primarily intended for a 



66 School Of Agriculture 

Bachelor of Science degree. However, qualified students can go on to gradu- 
ate school from this curriculum. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in plant protection is offered under the agricultural technology cur- 
riculum of the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 

CH 425, Organic Chemistry 3 
CH 426, Organic Chemistry 

or 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

Electives 0-3 

GROUP C COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

FC 211, Field Crops I 3 

HRT 201, Principles of Horticulture 3 

Electives 3-6 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

ENT 312, Economic Entomology 3 

Entomology Elective 3 

PP 315, Plant Diseases 3 

Plant Pathology Elective 3 

FC 414, Weeds and Their Control 3 

Electives 4 



POULTRY SCIENCE 



Professor H. W. Garren, Head of the Department 
Professors C. W. Barber, E. W. Glazener, C. H. Hill 
Associate Professors T. T. Brown, F. R. Craig, D. Fromm, J. W. Kelly 
Assistant Professors W. L. Blow, H. L. Bumgardner, F. W. Cook, G. A. 
Martin 



Objectives — The Department of Poultry Science has as its objectives train- 
ing the student in the principles of poultry husbandry and related scientific 
fields, and the application of these principles to the poultry industry. These 
principles include the evaluation, preparation, and processing of poultry 
and poultry products; breeding, nutrition, and diseases; and management 
of commercial poultry enterprises. 

Through teaching, research and extension, the department serves students, 
poultrymen, and allied industries. Poultry is among the most rapidly expand- 
ing industries in North Carolina, and production has increased tremendously 
during the past few years. 

The Department of Poultry Science is housed in Scott Hall. 



School Of Agriculture 67 

Opportunities — The demand for graduates in poultry science has increased 
greatly with the upswing in poultry production in the state. Graduates 
hold positions as managers and field representatives for feed manufac- 
turers, processors, hatcheries, equipment companies, biological supply 
houses and other enterprises in poultry and allied industries. They also 
work in communications and public relations and as teaching, extension and 
research specialists. Several graduates have established their own poultry 
businesses. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in poultry science can be obtained in any of the three curricula 
offered by the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 



GROUP A AND C COURSES (7 Credits) 



Credits 



GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 

GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

Electives 24 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 

PO 301, Poultry Quality Evaluations 2 

PO 401, Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 402, Commercial Poultry Enterprises 4 
PO 403, Poultry Seminar 1 + 1 

PO 404, Poultry Products 3 

PO 521, Poultry Nutrition 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

♦Electives 12 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 

PO 401, Poultry Diseases 4 
PO 403, Poultry Seminar 1 + 1 

PO 404, Poultry Products 3 

PO 520, Poultry Breeding 3 

PO 521, Poultry Nutrition 3 

PO 522, Endocrinology of the Fowl 3 

ZO 561, Animal Embryology 4 

Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural tech- 
nology curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (11 Credits) 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

GN 411, The Principles of Genetics 3 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 



*Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. 



68 School Of Agriculture 

GROUP C COURSES (10 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 10 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 

PO 301, Poultry Quality Evaluations 2 

PO 401, Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 402, Commercial Poultry Enterprises 4 

PO 403, Poultry Seminar 1 + 1 

PO 404, Poultry Products 8 

PO 620, Poultry Breeding 3 

PO 521. Poultry Nutrition 3 

Electives 2 

Graduate Study — The Master of Science degree is offered in poultry 
science with major studies in genetics, nutrition, veterinary pathology, 
and physiology. Fundamental work in chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, 
bacteriology, statistics and fields that relate directly to the major interest 
are required as a part of the program for the Master of Science degree. 



PRE-VETERINARY 



A pre-veterinary curriculum is offered as part of a working agreement 
with two Southern veterinary colleges. After the completion of the pre- 
scribed work (usually three years) eight North Carolina students are 
selected each year to attend the University of Georgia and four to attend 
the Veterinary College at Oklahoma State University at in-state rather 
than out-of-state tuition rates. 

The first year's work (up to 42 credits) at either Georgia or Oklahoma 
may be transferred back to North Carolina State College and counted 
toward graduation requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree from 
State College in zoology, animal industry, or poultry science. 

Curriculum — The pre-veterinary program is offered under the agricultural 
science curriculum of the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Science — The courses listed below are minimum requirements 
for all students applying for entrance to veterinary school under the South- 
ern Regional Education Board contract. Only these students who complete 
the required courses successfully (grade C or better on each) will be con- 
sidered eligible to apply. An over-all 2.50 scholastic average or better is 
mandatory for application to Oklahoma State University. 

LANGUAGES (9 Credits) 

Credits 
ENG 111, 112, English Composition 6 

English Elective 3 

SOCIAL SCIENCE AND HUMANITIES (6 Credits) 

Credits 
HI 261, The U. S. in Western Civilization 3 

PS 201, American Government System 3 



School Of Agriculture 69 

PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (36 Credits) 

Credits 

MA 111, 112, Algebra and Trigonometry; Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 8 

CH 101, 103, General Inorganic Chemistry ; General and Qualitative Chemistry 8 

CH 203, General and Organic Chemistry 4 

CH 451, Introductory Biochemistry 3 

PY 211, 212, General Physics 8 

BO 103, General Botany 4 

ZO 103, General Zoology 4 

ZO 223, Comparative Anatomy 4 

GROUP C COURSES (12 Credits) 

AI 201, Elements of Dairy Science 4 

AI 202, Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

PO 201, Poultry Production 4 



RURAL SOCIOLOGY 



Professor Selz C. Mayo, Head of the Department 
Professor C. Horace Hamilton 
Associate Professor Glenn C. McCann 
Assistant Professor James N. Young 



Objectives — The principal aim of this department is to teach students the 
principles and techniques for understanding human group behavior. More 
specifically the department seeks (1) to train students to become leaders 
in organizing rural groups and communities and in administering their 
programs; (2) to qualify exceptional students on the undergraduate and 
graduate levels for rural sociological research, teaching and extension work; 
(3) to solve problems in human group relations through scientific re- 
search; and (4) to extend research results to the people of the state. 

The Department of Rural Sociology is housed in the 1911 Building. 

Opportunities — Graduates of this department may obtain employment as 
community organization specialists, county agents, social welfare workers, 
social statisticians, administrators and managers of both public and private 
social agencies, college teachers, research workers and many other ca- 
pacities. 

Among the institutions offering employment to graduates are land-grant 
colleges, agricultural experiment stations, and extension services; the 
United States Departments of Agriculture, State, and Health Education and 
Welfare; state departments of welfare, health and education; farm journals 
and newspapers; voluntary social agencies, such as Red Cross, Community 
Chest, and Boy Scouts; and rural fraternal organizations, and cooperatives. 
The range of vocational pursuits open to rural sociology graduates is con- 
stantly widening. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in rural sociology is offered under the agricultural science cur- 
riculum of the School of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



70 School Of Agriculture 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 



Credits 



ST 311, Introduction to Statistics 3 

GN 411, Principles of Genetics 3 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

♦Electives 17 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 3 

RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

SOC 301, Human Behavior 3 

ANT 252, Cultural Anthropology 3 

RS 321, Introduction to Social Research 3 

RS 442, Rural Social Structure 3 

Electives 8 



♦Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C. Additional electives may be chosen from 
Group D. 

Graduate Study — The Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees are offered by this department. Graduate students studying for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree are required to take approximately 15 
semester hours in the Department of Sociology at the University of North 
Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Students seeking the Master of Science degree 
may take courses at Chapel Hill, but normally will be able to complete 
their entire programs at State College. 

Advanced work in rural sociology provides training in a number of social 
sciences and prepares the graduate student for a wide variety of positions. 



SOILS 



Professor J. W. Fitts, Head of the Department 

Associate Professors S. E. Younts, In Charge, Soils Teaching 

Professors W. V. Bartholomew, N. T. Coleman, J. F. Lutz, W. G. Woltz, 

W. W. Woodhouse, Jr. 
Associate Professors Homer C. Folks, E. J. Kamprath, C. B. McCants, R. J. 

McCracken, A. Mehlich, J. R. Piland, W. H. Rankin, P. H. Reid, R. J. 

Volk, S. B. Weed 
Assistant Professors E. F. Goldston, W. A. Jackson, R. E. McCollum 
Instructors D. L. Craig, C. B. England, James Shelton, E. O. Skogley 



Objectives — The primary objective of the Soils Department is to train 
students in the fundamental principles of soils, its utilization and manage- 
ment. Soils constitute one of the largest capital investments in farming 
and proper soil management is essential for efficient production. Therefore, 
the demand by educational, research and service agencies and by industry 
for men trained in soils should continue to be great. 

The Department of Soils is housed in Williams Hall. 

Opportunities — Soils graduates are trained to fill positions of leadership 
in many areas of agricultural work, such as county extension agents; 
farm operators and managers; soil conservation service representatives; 
technicians or salesmen in fertilizer companies. Provision is also made for 



School Of Agriculture 71 

those students who wish to obtain a more thorough training in mathematics, 
chemistry, physics, and biological sciences in anticipation of graduate study. 
Students with advanced degrees have unlimited opportunities in teaching, 
research and extension with state and federal institutions as well as in- 
creasing opportunities with commercial concerns. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in soils is offered under all three of the curricula in the School of 
Agriculture. 

Agricultural Business — The requirements of the agricultural business 
curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP B COURSES (24 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 24 

GROUP A AND C COURSES (6 Credits) 

Electives 6 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

SOI 200, Soils 4 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SOI 302, Soils and Plant Growth 3 

SOI 480, Senior Seminar 1 

SOI 461, Soil Conservation and Management 3 

SOI 452, Soil Classification 3 

Electives 6 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

Credits 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

MA 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

PY 212, General Physics 4 

•Elective 3 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

Chemistry 12 

SOI 200. Soils 4 

SOI 480, Senior Seminar 1 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SOI 302, 302L, Soils and Plant Growth 4-9 

SOI 461, Soils Conservation and Management 3 

SOI 452, Soil Classification 3 



•May be elected from Groups B and C. 

Agricultural Technology — The requirements of the agricultural technol- 
ogy curriculum are as follows: 

GROUP A AND B COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 
Electives 9.12 



72 School Of Agriculture 

GROUP C COURSES (9-12 Credits) 

Credits 

Elective* 9-12 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (27 Credits) 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

BO 312, General Bacteriology 4 

BO 421, Plant Physiology 4 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SOI 302, Soils and Plant Growth 3 

SOI 480, Senior Seminar 1 

SOI 461, Soil Conservation and Management 3 

SOI 452. Soil Classification 3 

Elective From Group A or B 3 

Graduate Study — The Department of Soils offers training leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the following 
fields: soil chemistry, soil fertility, soil physics, soil genesis and soil micro- 
biology. 



ZOOLOGY 



Professor F. S. Barkalow, Jr., Head of the Department 

Professors R. Harkema, T. L. Quay 

Associate Professor W. W. Hassler 

Assistant Professors C. W. Alliston, F. E. Hester, G. C. Miller, J. A. 

Santolucito 
Instructors F. G. Gerlock, Jr., F. L. Roberts 



Objectives — The Department of Zoology at North Carolina State is or- 
ganized to serve three purposes: (1) It serves the Schools of Agriculture- 
Forestry, and Education by teaching courses of a fundamental nature 
essential to a complete understanding and mastery of applied science; (2) 
it provides training in zoology which prepares students for positions in 
industrial and governmental laboratories; (3) it provides undergraduate 
curricula leading to graduate and professional training in dentistry, medi- 
cine, veterinary medicine, and advanced zoological sciences; (4) it furnishes 
potential leaders in the field of wildlife conservation and game management 
through a curriculum in wildlife biology. 

The Department of Zoology is housed in Gardner Hall. 

Opportunities — The zoology program is sufficiently flexible to provide 
the basic training for students who wish to continue their education at the 
graduate level, or its equivalent, in numerous special phases. 

Five categories of positions are available to wildlife graduates: adminis- 
trative, law enforcement, refuge, education, and research. Agencies em- 
ploying the majority of trained men are state game and fish departments, 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Forest Service, U. S. Soil Conserva- 
tion Service, U. S. National Park Service, Pure Food and Drug Administra- 
tion, and other federal land-use departments. 

Employment opportunities continue to be good, especially at the graduate 
level. No excess of wildlife graduates is anticipated in the immediate future. 



School Of Agriculture 73 

Unusual advantages are offered by the wide range of natural environ- 
ments in North Carolina's Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and mountain regions. 
Close cooperation with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission 
provides opportunities for observing developments in wildlife management 
on its 27 wildlife management and refuge areas. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Wildlife Biology — The Department of Zool- 
ogy offers the degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in wildlife biology 
under the School of Agriculture's agricultural science curriculum. 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 



LANGUAGES (3 Credits) 

Credits 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

ZO 205, Invertebrate Zoology 4 

ZO 206, Vertebrate Zoology 4 

ZO 321, Wildlife and Natural Resource Conservation 3 

One course in Botany 2 or 3 

One course in Entomology 3 

One course in Chemistry 3 
Electives (from Botany, Chemistry, Soils, Geology, Entomology, 

Genetics, Mathematics and/or Statistics) 2 or 4 

♦Electives 3 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

ZO 223, Comparative Anatomy 4 

ZO 622* Animal Ecology 3 

ZO 620, Fishery Science 3 

ZO 651, Wildlife Science 3 
ZO 621, Fishery Science 

or 

ZO 552, Wildlife Science 3 

Advised Electives 6 



*May be elected from Groups B and C. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — Zoology — The degree of Bachelor of Science 
with a major in zoology is offered under the agricultural science curriculum. 

Agricultural Science — The requirements of the agricultural science cur- 
riculum are as follows: 

LANGUAGES (3 Credits) 

Credits 
ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 

GROUP A COURSES (26 Credits) 

ZO 301, Animal Physiology 4 

ZO 223, Comparative Anatomy 4 

Restricted electives from Group A 12 

Restricted electives from Groups A, B, and /or C 6 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES (26 Credits) 

Advised electives (two courses must be in Zoology) 26 



74 School Of Agriculture 

Graduate Study — The Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees are offered in animal ecology and wildlife biology. Graduate pro- 
grams leading to advanced degrees in the areas of animal parasitology and 
physiology can be arranged in cooperation with the Department of Zoology 
of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



THE NORTH CAROLINA 
AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

H. B. James, Dean of Agriculture 

E. W. Glazener, Director of Instruction 

Homer C. Folks, Assistant Director of Instruction and 
Director of the Agricultural Institute 

A two year program in agriculture was approved and money was appro- 
priated for this purpose by the 1959 General Assembly. Through action of 
the Board of Trustees of the Greater University, this two year program was 
named the North Carolina Agricultural Institute and was approved for 
operation on the North Carolina State College campus. 

Objectives — The major objective of the Agricultural Institute is to pro- 
vide technical training to the individual so that he may become more pro- 
ductive in our agricultural society. Specifically, instructions offered by the 
Agriculture Institute are designed to train men and women for those jobs 
in agriculture that require technicians with education beyond the high 
school level. By providing an individual with this type of training the 
Institute is convinced that he will have a better income, assume a more 
prominent role of leadership in his community, and become an asset to 
agriculture and to his community. 

The instructional programs of the Agricultural Institute are organized 
and conducted as part of the School of Agriculture's over-all resident instruc- 
tion program. The Institute is an addition to, and not a substitute for, the 
regular degree granting program of the School of Agriculture. However, 
in order to provide students enrolled in the Institute with the best possible 
technical training, the faculty in residence for the four year program will 
be responsible for organizing and teaching courses offered by the Institute. 

People who have training similar to that which can be obtained in the 
courses offered in the Agricultural Institute are in great demand by agri- 
cultural industries. As this demand changes, new courses of study will be 
organized. Also, programs no longer needed will be dropped. Only through 
such a system of addition and deletion can the Agricultural Institute meet 
the needs for technically trained people in North Carolina. 

Opportunities For Graduates — Rapid technical advancement has been ex- 
tremely important in changing agriculture from a small production industry 
to one of the largest industries in the nation. Today the farmer uses scien- 
tifically developed seed, feed, fertilizer; does most of his work with machin- 
ery and has scientific testing to back up his management decisions. Increased 
production has allowed him to sell much of his production rather than just 



School Of Agriculture 75 

the surplus above home consumption. Farms have become larger due to 
these technological advances and large amounts of capital are needed to 
operate successfully. All of these factors bring about dependence on outside 
sources of information and capital for success in a modern agricultural 
business. 

Not only the person who farms, but the hundreds of related businesses 
that are a vital part of agriculture today can not operate successfully with- 
out men trained in technical skills. 

Entrance Requirements — Any individual who has received a diploma from 
an accredited high school or has passed the high school equivalency exam- 
ination administered by the State Department of Public Instruction is 
eligible for entry into the Agricultural Institute. Each application will be 
reviewed and evaluated by the Institute director before an applicant will 
be accepted. 

Programs Of Study — The initial five programs of study offered are: 
Farm Machinery Sales and Service, General Agriculture, Livestock Man- 
angement and Technology, Poultry Technology, and Pest Control. 



THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

H. B. James, Dean of Agriculture 
R. L. Loworn, Director of Research 

The Agricultural Experiment Station was established in accordance with 
an Act of the General Assembly of 1877 and amended in 1955. The North 
Carolina General Assembly has allocated to the Station, annually, certain 
funds from the General Fund. 

Objectives— The purpose of the Agricultural Experiment Station is to 
study the basic laws of nature underlying agricultural enterprises and to 
develop methods for economic production of the highest grades of livestock, 
poultry, and plants on the many soil types and under the varied conditions' 
existing in North Carolina; to study methods for the control of parasitic 
insects and organisms that cause serious economic losses of animals, poul- 
try, and plants; to find and develop varieties of animals, poultry, and 
plants new and resistant to diseases and the changeable conditions pre- 
vailing in the state; and to perfect better marketing for all agricultural 
products. 

The staff of the Experiment Station conducts experiments in the green- 
houses and laboratories of the college, and throughout the state on areas 
owned by farmers, on 19 strategically located experimental farms, and on 
farms rented for short periods. 

The agricultural research aims, through the discovery of new facts, to 
improve the well-being of farmers throughout the state; to strengthen the 
regulatory work of the State Department of Agriculture; to develop new 
and necessary facts for the teaching of sound agricultural principles by 



76 School Of Agriculture 

vocational agricultural instructors, agricultural extension agents and agri- 
cultural instructors in the college. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station staff brings to the college many 
experts, whose teaching in many specialized fields of agriculture assures 
the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes much to the 
advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, teach- 
ers, and investigators necessary in the maintenance of agriculture on sound 
and economics planes. 

Publications — The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bul- 
letins and scientific papers on results of research conducted by the staff. 
These are free and are sent upon request to anyone in the state. 

Services — The staff diagnoses and interprets many problems for the 
farmers of North Carolina. It holds council with farmers and others inter- 
ested in the agricultural industry, presents radio programs devoted to the 
discussion of farming procedures, and writes many letters on more specific 
problems of agriculture at the request of farmers, members of garden 
clubs, and manufacturers of fertilizer, fungicides and insecticides. It also 
takes part in many of the administrative functions of the college. 



COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 
WORK 

H. B. James, Dean of Agriculture 

I. O. Schaub, Director Emeritus of Extension 

David S. Weaver, Director of Extension 



The Agricultural Extension Service of State College is conducted co- 
operatively with the United States Department of Agriculture and with 
the one hundred counties in North Carolina. Its work is suported by federal 
funds derived from the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, the Capper-Ketcham Act 
of 1928, the Bankhead-Jones Act of 1935, the Bankhead-Flannagan Act of 
1945, and by state and county appropriations. Federal and state appropria- 
tions are used to maintain an administrative and specialist staff and to 
supplement salaries and travel expenses of county extension agents, who 
are located at each county seat in the state. 

Objectives — The purpose of the Extension Service is to take to the rural 
people of North Carolina the latest and best information obtainable for 
building a more prosperous and satisfying life on the farm. In carrying out 
this purpose, the college maintains a staff of trained specialists, a system 
of county agents and assistants, and home economics agents who work with 
the farmer and his family and who administer a state-wide educational 
program. Work is also done with firms which furnish the tools and supplies 
for farm production and which market and process agricultural commo- 
dities. In these programs, the Extension Service employs a variety of 
methods and devices. These include method and result demonstrations for 



School Of Agriculture 77 

group meetings, a training program for farm leaders within the commu- 
y ', an £ u close contact with organized clubs of men, women, and young 
people. The service also publishes a great number of pamphlets, bulletins 
and circulars which it distributes free. In addition, it holds a number of 
short courses, both on the college campus and elsewhere throughout the 
state to offer rural leaders advice and training in creating better homes 
and farms and m using more efficient farming practices. 




STUDENT SUPPLY Store is housed in a modern building which was completed 
lote in 1959. With its equipment, the building is valued at $350,000. In addition 
to its excellent book department, the store also has departments featuring general 
student supplies, engineering equipment, and a fountain-snack bar. 



Student Supply Store 




STUDENTS browse in the book section of Student Supply Store. 



School of Design 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

Henry L. Kamphoefner, Dean 



In 1948 the School of Design was organized through the combination of 
the extisting Departments of Architecture and Landscape Acrhitecture. 
The 1957 General Assembly appropriated funds for the establishment of 
a third Department of Product Design. The three departments are devoted 
and dedicated to the development of a native design and its accompanying 
art forms for the southern region. 

The school in its teaching recognizes the dangers inherent in a materialist- 
mechanistic civilization where there may be an over-reliance on the machine 
and the mechanical devices available for use to man in his constructions 
for shelter. We give attention, therefore, to that larger responsibility of 
architecture, the art of humanizing the environment. 

And, while the natural and organic aspects of design are stressed, the 
international and universal aspects of design are also respected and related 
to the humane patterns of life. We seek to integrate the architect as a 
social human being and the architect as scientist-engineer, and we encourage 
and nurture the architect-engineer as the coordinator of the structural 
dynamics in the over-all pattern of life. 

While our first aim is to serve North Carolina and the regions of the 
South, we believe that our students will be equipped, through the teaching 
of the school, to work in any region. 

Because character, a profound devotion, and an absolute professional 
commitment are prime ingredients of any creative activity where the 
social responsibilities are as vital as in architecture and design, we foster 
and cultivate the integrity of the individual. 

Individual creative expression is emphasized as the epitome of good 
design, but teamwork is also encouraged and developed as a necessity of 
human progress in the machine civilization of the day. We believe that 
the "prima donna" who isolates himself behind the intellectual barrier 
of his own self-sufficiency fails to recognize and understand the importance 
and necessity of the formal technique of compromise as a dominant factor 
of design as related to the social pattern of life — just as nature in all her 
workings adjusts to all pressures and all tensions. 

The faculty members of the School of Design have been selected for their 
individual and diverse personal philosophies and their individual yet diver- 
gent professional qualifications. We have brought together creative person- 
alities willing in their teaching to subordinate their own professional 
interests to the pedagogically more important interests of their students. 
Here a community of scholars working each in his own way searches for the 
truth as he sees it, giving the young student the benefit of his professional 
knowledge, his technical training, and his experience as a citizen. We en- 
courage the student to sift and sort this diversity of opinion, even though 
in this process he is usually stimulated and occasionally confounded. In the 
end we are confident that he arrives through this process at an ability to 
shape his own conclusions. 

To combat the dangers of over-specialization we seek to develop the 
personality and character as a whole. The goal in the growth of the student 
is not only the mastery of the architectural techniques of the profession; 
but through the stimulation and development of the intellectual and emotion- 
al capacities together, a readiness is developed to meet the challenge of 
any environment. 



82 School Of Design 

The School of Design is intended to act as an educational center which 
unifies different design professions in the fundamental knowledge and 
methods which they share; its further intention is the education of men 
who will be competent within the specific demands and limitations of a 
particular field of design. The existence of contemporary design is con- 
sidered to be a requirement of contemporary man, and the greatest purpose 
of contemporary design is considered to be the solution of those require- 
ments through full use of the ingenuity and knowledge of contemporary 
man. Through this point of view the technical and factual aspects of 
design present no conflict with its philosophical and aesthetic standards, 
for one is but the particularization of the other. The course is based upon 
a belief in the basic ambivalence of the process of designing. 

The three professional fields have been grouped under one broad and 
unified study of the methods and values which are common to all designers, 
and they are separated only in the study of their application in the work 
of a single profession. Many classes throughout the curricula will include 
students in these professional fields; and for all students the course of 
study is the same during the first year in order that, having become more 
familiar with the whole scope of activity in design, they may then select the 
design profession in which they are most interested. When this selection 
has been made, the unity of the school and frequent collaboration prevent 
the unnatural isolation of any professional group. 

Training in drawing, painting, sculpture and other visual arts is con- 
ducted by specialists within the staff of the School of Design; the essential 
knowledge of techniques and materials is taught by this faculty and other 
departments of the college; and the past and present of the professions are 
taught by this faculty. These ingredients of design training are assimilated 
through their application in the design courses. Thus the student is re- 
quired to combine these studies increasingly as he advances through the 
course so that he may achieve that comprehensive combination which is a 
necessity in the designer. Much of the student's work will be done in 
laboratory courses since design is a matter of the application of know- 
ledge rather than its mere accumulation. From his first day in class to 
his last the student is asked to design and he is counseled so that he may 
become a responsible professional in the broadest sense. 

Curricula — The School of Design offers professional instruction to the 
undergraduate in architecture, landscape architecture, and product design. 
A graduate program in all three departments is projected for the future. 

Degrees — The five-year curricula offer courses of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Architecture, the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, and the 
Bachelor of Product Design. 

Facilities — The School of Design moved to Brooks Hall in January, 1956. 
Brooks Hall is the former Hill Library, built in 1928 and vacated in 1954 
after a new million and a quarter dollar library for the college was com- 
pleted with state funds. The new Brooks Hall is a remodeling of 28,000 
square feet of floor space and a new addition of 20,000 square feet. All of 
the facilities of the school are now in modern, especially designed quarters 
under one roof. 

Opportunities — State law now requires the graduate architect to work 
not less than three years in the office of registered architects and to pass 
the four day written examination given by the North Carolina Board of 
Architecture before he is ready to commence his own practice. The great 
national boom in building construction since World War II has brought a 
tremendous volume of work into the offices of the South, offering many 
attractive positions for the architectural graduate. The architectural grad- 
uate is also qualified for positions in certain branches of engineering, build- 
ing research and teaching. 



School Of Design 83 

Usually the landscape architect practices in one of two ways. He may be 
a private practitioner with an office serving clients who come to him for 
help and advice in the same manner as a lawyer, engineer, or architect; 
or he may be an employee of a private or public organization. Organizations 
commonly employing landscape architects include other practicing land- 
scape architects; city planners; engineers; architects; national, state, and 
municipal recreation agencies; parkway and highway departments; housing 
agencies; planning commissions; conservation departments; and universities. 

Private concerns such as plant nurseries, private estates, botanical and 
zoological gardens, or construction companies may also employ landscape 
architects. 

Testimony to the soundness of the course of study and program of North 
Carolina State College is reflected by two of the department's recent 
graduates who have been awarded the Prix de Rome in Landscape Archi- 
tecture — a prize awarded annually to any graduate landscape architect in 
the United States affording two years advanced study in Europe and pro- 
viding all expenses and residence at the American Academy in Rome. Three 
recent graduates of the school have won the top academic award in 
architecture, the Paris Prize, which is a scholarship worth $5,000 for a 
year's study in Europe. 

The new Department of Product Design, which took its first students in 
September 1958, will prepare graduates to work as resident designers with 
the furniture manufacturers and other essential and important industries 
of the state. The graduates of the new department will also be qualified 
to establish offices as professional industrial designers in the major cities 
of the state. 



ARCHITECTURE 



Professors Roy Gussow, George Matsumoto 

Visiting Professor Horacio Caminos 

Associate Professors Joseph H. Cox, Cecil D. Elliott, Charles H. Kahn, 

Duncan R. Stuart, Edward W. Waugh 
Assistant Professors George L. Bireline, John Hertzman, John P. Shaw 
Visiting Assistant Professors Paul M-J. Buisson, Brian Shawcroft 
Librarian Mrs. James A. Lyons 



CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester Credit* Spring Semester Credit* 

DN 101, Design I 8 DN 102, Design II 8 

DN 111, Descriptive Drawing I 2 DN 112, Descriptive Drawing II 2 

DN 121, Technical Drawing 13 DN 122, Technical Drawing II 8 

ENG 111, Composition 8 ENG 112, Composition 3 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 5 MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

MS 101, Military Science I Calculus I 4 

or MS 102, Military Science I 
AS 121, Air Science I 1 or 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 AS 122, Air Science I 1 



13 



PE 102. Physical Education 1 

17 



84 



School Of Design- 



second YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 201, Architectural Design I 
DN 211, Descriptive Drawing III 
HI 245, European Civilization 
MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 211, General Physics 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 
2 
3 

4 

4 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 
ARC 202, Architectural Design II 4 
DN 212, Descriptive Drawing IV 2 

EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 3 

HI 246, European Civilization 3 

PY 212, General Physics 4 
MS 202, Military Science II 



AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 



Summer Requirement: Two weeks on Historic Architecture Research — Field Work 



THIRD YEAR 



18 



Fall Semester Credits 

ARC 301, Architectural Design III 6 
CE 338, Structures I 4 

DN 311, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing I 2 

DN 321, History of 

Architecture I 3 

EM 321, Strength of Materials I 3 

Elective* 3 



21 



Spring Semester 

ARC 300, Historic Architecture 

Research 
ARC 302, Architectural Design IV 
ARC 312, Materials and 

Specifications 
CE 339, Structures II 
DN 312, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing II 
DN 322, History of 

Architecture II 



Credits 



20 



Summer Requirement: 10 weeks on approved construction or office project experience. 



FOURTH YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 401, Architectural Design 
ARC 421, Structural Design I 
DN 411, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing III 
DN 421, History of Design I 
ME 378, Building Mechanics B 

Elective* 



Credits 
6 
8 



20 



Spring Semester Credits 

ARC 402, Architectural Design VI 6 

ARC 422, Structural Design II 3 
DN 412, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing IV 2 

ME 377, Building Mechanics A 3 

DN 422, History of Design H 8 

Elective* 8 



20 



FIFTH YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ARC 601, Architectural Design VII 7 



ARC 511, Professional Practice 
ARC 631, Structural Design III 
DN 641, Seminar on Ideas in 

Design 

Elective* 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

ARC 602, Architectural Design VIII 9 



ARC 632, Structural Design IV 
PHI 306, Philosophy of Art 
Elective* 



2 
8 

4 

18 



* Six credits of elective will be required in the literature of English and three in the 
Social Sciences. The remaining ten hours shall be free electives. (Total credits for 
Bachelor of Architecture — 190.) 



School Of Design 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



85 



Professors Roy Gussow, Edwin G. Thurlow 
Associate Professors Joseph H. Cox, Duncan R. Stuart 
Visiting Associate Professor Lewis J. Clarke 
Assistant Professor George L. Bireline 



CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DN 101, Design I 

DN 111, Descriptive Drawing I 

DN 121, Technical Drawing I 

ENG 111, Composition 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 

MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
AS 121, Air Science I 
PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 



18 



Spring Semester 

DN 102, Design II 

DN 112, Descriptive Drawing II 

DN 122, Technical Drawing II 

ENG 112, Composition 

MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 
MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 
PE 102, Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 



17 



SECOND YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 201, Architectural Design I 

BO 103, General Botany 

DN 211, Descriptive Drawing III 

HI 245, European Civilization 

PY 211, General Physics 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Credit* 

4 
4 
2 
3 

4 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

ARC 202, Architectural Design II 4 

DN 212, Descriptive Drawing IV 2 

HI 246, European Civilization 3 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

PY 212. General Physics 4 
MS 202, Military Science II 

or 

AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



18 

Summer Requirement: 2 weeks Historic Architecture or Landscape Architecture Research- 
Field Work. 



THIRD YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DN 311, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing I 
DN 321, History of 

Architecture I 
HRT 201. Plant Materials 
LA 301, Landscape Design I 
LA 311, Landscape Construction 

Elective* 



Credits 



20 



Spring Semester 

ARC 300, Historic Architecture 

Research 
DN 312, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing II 
DN 322, History of 

Architecture II 
HRT 202, Plant Materials 
LA 302, Landscape Design II 
LA 312, Landscape Construction 



Credits 



19 



Summer Requirement: Ten weeks on approved construction or office project experience. 



FOURTH YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 441, Plant Ecology 

DN 411, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing III 
DN 421, History of Design I 
LA 401, Landscape Design III 
LA 421, Planting Design 

Elective* 



Credits 
3 

2 
3 
6 
4 
3 

21 



Spring Semester 

DN 412, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing IV 
DN 422, History of Design II 
LA 402, Landscape Design IV 
LA 422, Planting Design 

Electives* 



Credits 



21 



86 



School Of Design 



FIFTH YEAR 



Fall Semester ( 


><a 


DN 511, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing V 
DN 541, Seminar or Ideas in 

Design 
LA 501, Landscape Design V 
LA 511, Landscape Construction 

and Professional Practice 

Elective?* 


2 

2 

G 

4 
4 




18 



Spring Semester 

DN 512, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing VI 
LA 502, Landscape Design VI 
PHI 306, Philosophy of Art 

Electives* 



Credit* 



19 



• Six credits of elective will be required in the literature of English and six in the 
Social Sciences. The remaining ten hours shall be free electives. (Total credits for the 
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture — 190.) 



PRODUCT DESIGN 



Associate Professor Austin R. Baer, Head of the Department 

Professor Roy Gussow 

Associate Professors Joseph H. Cox, Duncan R. Stuart 

Assistant Professor George L. Bireline, John Hertzman, Clark Macomber 

Instructor William J. Baron 



CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DN 101, Design I 

DN 111, Descriptive Drawing I 

DN 121, Technical Drawing I 

ENG 111, Composition 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 

MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
AS 121, Air Science I 
PE 101. Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
5 



Spring Semester 

DN 102, Design II 

DN 112, Descriptive Drawing II 

DN 122, Technical Drawing II 

ENG 112, Composition 

MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 
MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 
PE 102, Physical Education 



Credits 



is 



17 



SECOND YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DN 211, Descriptive Drawing III 

HI 245, European Civilization 

IE 217, Machine Tools 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PD 201. Product Design and 

Orientation 
PY 211, General Physics 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Credit* 
2 



20 



Spring Semester 

DN 212, Descriptive Drawing IV 

HI 246, European Civilization 

IE 218, Metal Forming 

PD 202, Product Design and 

Orientation 
PSY 200, Introduction to 

Psychology 
PY 212, General Physics 
MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 
2 
3 

1 



19 



School Of Design 



THIRD YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 
DN 311, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing I 
EC 425, Industrial Management 
EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 
PD 301, Product Design 
PD 331, Materials and Processes 



Credits 

4 

2 

3 
3 
6 
3 

21 



Spring Semester 

CH 103, General Qualitative 

Chemistry 
DN 312, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing II 
EM 312, Mechanics II (Dynamics) 
EM 321, Strength of Materials I 
PD 302. Product Design 
PD 332, Materials and Processes 



Creaits 



21 



FOURTH YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DN 411, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing III 
IE 301, Engineering Economy 
PD 401, Advanced Product Design 
PD 441, Design Analysis 

Electives* 



Credits 



19 



Spring Semester 

DN 412, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing TV 
TE 425, Sales and Distribution 

Methods 
PD 402, Advanced Product Design 
PD 422, Office and Industrial 

Practice 
PD 442. Design Analysis 

Electives* 



Credits 



20 



FIFTH YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DN 611, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing V 
DN 541, Seminar on Ideas 

in Design 
PD 501, Advanced Product Design 
PSY 464, Visual Perception 

Electives* 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

DN 512, Advanced Descriptive 

Drawing VI 
PD 502, Product Design Thesis 
PSY 441, Human Factors in 

Equipment Design 

Electives* 



IS 



Credits 

2 

9 

3 
3 

17 



•Six credits will be required in the literature of English and three in the Social Sciences 
The remaining ten hours shall be free electives. (Total credits for the Bachelor of Product 
Design — 190.) 



Kilgore 

and 

Brooks 

Halls 




KILGORE HALL is the headquarters of the 
School of Forestry and the Department of 
Horticulture. (The Forestry section is shown 
here.) The building is named for the late Dr. 
Benjamin Wesley Kilgore who was Dean of 
Agriculture at North Carolina State College 
from 1923 until 1925, and the first director 
of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension 
Service. 



:. 3ie|i B iiffSS!! 8 
*?ii!ii5!»3!3!!j 




iiiilL-iss 




BROOKS HALL is the home of North Carolina State College's world-famous 
School of Design. The building is named for the college's fifth president, the late 
Dr. Eugene Clyde Brooks. 



School of Education 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

J. Bryant Kirkland, Dean 



The maximal social and economic development of the citizenry of North 
Carolina is dependent to a great extent upon the contributions of its ed- 
ucational institutions. The current and anticipated increase in the population 
of secondary school age youth necessitates a greater number of compe- 
tent teachers in the public schools of North Carolina, particularly in the 
areas of vocational agriculture, industrial arts, industrial education math- 
ematics and science. 

The School of Education comprises the following departments: Agri- 
cultural Education, Industrial Arts, Industrial Education, Mathematics and 
Science Education, Occupational Information and Guidance, Psychology, 
and Recreation and Park Administration. 

The Department of Agricultural Education is the only one in this state 
that prepares teachers of vocational agriculture to conduct organized in- 
structional programs of vocational agriculture for prospective and present 
farmers. 

If the youth of North Carolina, particularly those in the non-farm 
areas, are to become familiar with the increasingly available occupational 
opportunities which accompany an industrial expansion and are to be 
given the training needed for entrance into the industrial occupations of 
their choice, public schools will need to employ a larger number of com- 
petent teachers of Industrial Arts and Industrial Education. 

The acute shortage of persons qualified to teach mathematics and science 
in the public schools and the demand for graduates with mathematics and 
science backgrounds in industrial positions have made employment oppor- 
tunities in these areas very good. 

Improved methods in industry and the use of mechanized equipment on 
farms have resulted in more leisure time on the part of urban and rural 
workers and their families. The Department of Recreation and Park Ad- 
ministration contributes much to a better use of this leisure time by training 
recreational leaders for the municipalities, industries and rural areas of 
the state. 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance provides 
the public schools with teachers and vocational counselors who render val- 
uable asistance to high school youth in making wise vocational choices. 

The Department of Psychology serves the various industries in the 
state by helping to improve their personnel selection programs and by 
conducting research designed to ascertain what factors influence efficiency 
of industrial employees. 

The primary purpose of the Departments of Agricultural Education, 
Industrial Arts, Industrial Education, Mathematics and Science Education 
is that of preparing students to become teachers in North Carolina's public 
schools. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum requirements in any of 
these departments qualifies a graduate to receive an A Grade certificate 
to teach in his chosen subject matter area. 

The curriculum in recreation and park administration is designed pri- 
marily to prepare students to become leaders of recreation programs in 
industry, institutions and rural areas. 



92 School Of Education 

The Departments of Psychology and Occupational Information and Guid- 
ance offer service courses for undergraduate students in the School of 
Education and other schools. These departments are primarily concerned, 
however, with offering professional instruction at the graduate level for 
industrial psychologists and vocational counselors. 

Curricular Offerings and Degrees — Upon the satisfactory completion of 
one of the undergraduate curricular in the School of Education, a student 
is eligible to receive the degree of Bachelor Science with the name of his 
area of specialization: in agricultural education, industrial arts, industrial 
education, mathematics education and science education, and recreation 
and park administration. 

The Master of Agricultural Education, Industrial Arts Education, In- 
dustrial Education and Occupational Information and Guidance is awarded 
to students in education who meet the general requirements of the Grad- 
uate School and the specific requirements of the respective departments 
in which graduate work is taken. Graduate students enrolled in any of the 
above departments and Psychology who wish to engage in more con- 
centrated study in their major field of interest and to conduct research in 
this field may earn a research degree — Master of Science — in their respective 
department of specialization. The specific requirements for undergraduate 
and graduate degrees are included in the departmental write-ups. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Professor C. C. Scarborough, Head of the Department 

Professor Emeritus J. K. Coggin 

Professor J. Bryant Kirkland 

Associate Professor G. B. James* 

Assistant Professor T. R. Miller 

Instructors C. D. Bryant, J. R. Clary 

Visiting Lecturer H. E. Beam 

*On Leave 



Objectives — The Department of Agricultural Education is responsible for 
supplying the public schools with an adequate number of competent teachers 
of vocational agriculture. Since most of his work as a teacher of vocational 
agriculture will be done with farm people, the student planning to teach 
should have lived on the farm. If he is not farm-reared, he will be expected 
to secure farm experience before he graduates. Enrollment in vocational 
agriculture in high school with a good supervised farming program con- 
tributes to his preparation for teaching vocational agriculture. 

The Agricultural Education Department provides professional training 
for students who plan to teach vocational agriculture in high schools. Some 
graduates, however, go into other work in agriculture, and others do graduate 
work in agricultural education. 

Opportunities — There is a great need for teachers of vocational agriculture 
in North Carolina, with every indication that the demand will be greater 
in the future. At present, there are 489 white teachers of vocational ag- 
riculture in 99 counties in the state. The program is one of the largest in 
the United States. 

Graduate Study — The department provides opportunities for fully quali- 
fied students to do graduate work in agricultural education. Graduate stu- 
dents in this field may qualify for either the Master of Science degree or 



School Of Education 



93 



for the degree of Master of Agricultural Education. Detailed information, 
concerning these degrees may be secured from the Department of Agri- 
cultural Education or from the Dean of the Graduate School. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM* 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

AG 103. Introduction to Agriculture 1 

BO 103, General Botany 4 
ED 102, Objectives in 

Agricultural Education 1 

ENG 111. Composition 3 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 4 
MS 101, Military Science I 



AS 121, Air Science I 

PE 101, Physical Education 



U 



Spring Semester Credits 

AGE 201, Agricultural Construction 

and Maintenance I 2 

ENG 112, Composition 3 

ZO 103, General Zoology 4 

MS 102, Military Science I 



AS 122, Air Science I 
PE 102, Physical Education 
Agriculture Elective 
Free Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

AGE 202, Agricultural Construction 

and Maintenance II 2 

CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 4 

EC 201, Economics 8 

PSY 304, Educational Psychology 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 



AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 
Agriculture Elective 



1 
1 
3 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

AGC 212, Economics of Agriculture 3 
AGE 211, Farm Power and 

Machinery I 3 

CH 203, General and Organic 

Chemistry 4 

ED 201, Farming Programs and FFA 2 
MS 202, Military Science II 



AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 
History Elective 



1 
1 
3 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

AGC 311, Organization and Business 
Management of Marketing 

Firms 3 

RS 301, Sociology of Rural Life 3 

SOI 200, Soils 4 
Agricultural Engineering 

Elective 3 

Biological Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 3 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

AGC 303, Organization and Business 

Management of Farms 3 

ED 313, Teaching Rural People 2 

ED 344, Secondary Education 2 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 2 

English Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 3 



18 



SENIOR YEAR** 



Fall Semester 

AGE 401. Problems in Farm 

Mechanics 
ED 411, Student Teaching 
ED 412, Teaching Adults 
ED 413, Teaching Materials 
RS 321, Introduction to Social 

Research 



Credits 

3 
6 
2 
2 

3 

16 



Semester 
ED 420, Principles in Guidance 
Agriculture Electives 
English Elective 
Political Science Elective 
Free Electives 



Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 
6 

17 



• A minimum of 136 semester credits required for graduation. 
••Summer Practice i2 weeks) is required prior to senior year. 



94 School Of Education 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



Professor Ivan Hostetler, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor Talmage B. Young 
Assistant Professors Carl A. Moeller, Robert T. Troxler 
Instructor Frank E. Briley 



Objectives — Industrial arts comprises that area of education which con- 
cerns itself with materials, processes, and products of industry. It is con- 
cerned with a study of changes made in materials to make them more 
useful and with the problems related to these changes. The processes in- 
volved in changing these materials to useful products constitute the labora- 
tory work in an industrial arts program. 

Students majoring in this area should have an active interest in industrial 
materials, processes, products and problems in such areas as woods, metals, 
electricity, ceramics, graphic arts and plastics. They should enjoy working 
with hand and machine tools. A wide range of technical skills, practical ex- 
perience and a knowledge of labor and problems is very important. 

The Department of Industrial Arts at North Carolina State College 
performs two functions: First, it prepares teachers and supervisors of 
industrial arts for secondary schools, and second, it provides practical 
training for students interested in technical jobs in industry, such as in- 
dustrial work in production, personnel, industrial sales, estimating, job 
training, maintenance and installation. 

Opportunities — The opportunities for employment as industrial arts 
teachers in North Carolina are greater than ever before. The demand of 
industrial arts teachers is greater than the supply. The demand for in- 
dustrial employment is also very great. 

Graduate Study — Opportunities are provided for qualified students to do 
graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Industrial Arts Education 
or Master of Science in Industrial Arts Education. For additional infor- 
mation regarding graduate study, the Graduate School Catalog should 
be consulted. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111, Composition 3 ENG 112, Composition 3 

IA 100, Introduction to IA 104, Drafting II 3 

Industrial Arts 1 IA 108, Woods II 3 

IA 103, Drafting I 3 MS 102, Military Science I 
IA 107, Woods 13 or 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 4 AS 122, Air Science I 1 

MS 101, Military Science I PE 102, Physical Education 1 

or Mathematics Elective 4 

AS 121, Air Science II — 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 IB 

16 



School Of Education 



95 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 4 

IA 206, Metal Processing I 3 

PS 201, The American Governmental 

System 8 

PY 211, General Physics 4 

MS 201, Military Science II 



AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 



16 



Spring Semester 

EC 205, Economic Process 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 

IA 207, Metal Processing II 

PY 212, General Physics 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
8 

4 



IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ED 344, Secondary Education 

IA 205, Industrial Arts Design 

IA 307, Basic Electricity 

PSY 301, Educational Psychology 
English Elective 
History Elective 
*Electives 



Credits 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
8 

19 



Spring Semester 

ED 422, Methods of Teaching 

Industrial Subjects 
IA 304, General Shop Organization 
IA 308, Basic Electronics 
PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 

Electives* 



Credits 

4 
2 
3 
2 

7 

18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ED 444, Student Teaching in 

Industrial Subjects 
ED 482, Curriculum Problems in 

Industrial Arts 
ED 483, Instructional Aids and 

Devices 
IA 465, Independent Study in 

Industrial Arts 
IA 484, School Shop Planning and 

Equipment Selection 

*Electives 



Credits 



Spring Semester 
ED 420, Principles of Guidance 
IA 480, Modern Industries 
♦Electives 



Credits 

2 

3 

12 

17 



19 



• Twelve hours are to be technical electives ; the remaining 13 hours are to be free electives. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS— TECHNICAL OPTION CURRICULUM 

(Freshman and Sophomore Years same as in Industrial Arts Education) 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

IA 205, Industrial Arts Design 
IA 307, Basic Electricity 
IE 310, Industrial Safety 
IE 332, Motion and Time Study 
PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 
•Electives 



Credits 
2 
3 
2 
4 



17 



Spring Semester 
IA 308, Basic Electronics 
PSY 337, Industrial Psychology 
SOC 301, Human Behavior 
English Elective 
History Elective 
•Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 



96 School Of Education 



Fall Semester 

EC 425, Industrial Management 
IA 321, Metalwork Technology 
IA 480, Modern Industries 
IE 408, Production Control 
•Electives 



SENIOR 


YEAR 






Credit* 


Spring 


Semester 


Credit* 


3 
2 
3 
8 
8 


EC 426, 
EC 432, 
IE 430, 


Personnel Management 
Industrial Relations 
Job Evaluation and Wage 

Incentives 
*Electives 


3 
3 

8 
10 



19 19 



* Twelve hours are to be technical electives ; the remaining 12 hours are to be (ree 
electives. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Professor Durwin M. Hanson 

Objectives — The Department of Industrial Education is the only one in 
the state that prepares teachers of industrial education for the public 
schools. The main goal is to provide public schools with adequately trained 
personnel who can, in turn, help to develop a vitally needed reservoir of 
skilled workers and technical personnel to man established industries as 
well as prepare for new industries. The curriculum is planned to provide 
students with broad cultural and professional backgrounds to parallel 
occupational experience. 

Candidates for a degree must have had at least two years of successful 
trade experience in the trade they wish to teach. The student who has 
not had this trade experience when he enters must fulfill the requirement 
before graduation either by working part of the school year or by com- 
pleting the work experience after finishing the required resident courses. 

Opportunities — The student who completes this curriculum will be pre- 
pared to teach in the all-day trade schools, area vocational schools and 
the part-time, or evening vocational classes. Graduates have no difficulty 
in obtaining employment as institutional teachers. 

Graduate Study — General and specialized professional courses are avail- 
able to qualified students who wish to pursue graduate study as industrial 
education teachers, supervisors or coordinators of diversified occupations. 
The completion of the Master of Industrial Education or Master of Science 
degree in industrial education will also qualify one for a Graduate 
Certificate in North Carolina. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM* 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 100, Introduction to ENG 112, Composition 3 

Industrial Education 2 HI History Elective 3 

ENG 111, Composition 3 IA 104, Drafting II 3 

IA 103, Drafting I 3 MA 122, Mathematics of Finance and 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 4 Elementary Statistics 4 

MS 101, Military Science I MS 102, Military Science I 

or or 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 AS 122, Air Science I 1 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 PE 102, Physical Education 1 

14 16 



School Of Education 



97 



Fall Semester 

CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 
ENG English Elective 
PY 211. General Physics 
PS 201, The American Government 

System 
MS 201. Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 

Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 



Spring Semester 


Credits 


EC 205, Economics 

PY 212, General Physics 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 

MS 202, Military Science II 


8 

A 
8 


or 

AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 
Elective 


1 
1 
6 



17 



19 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 
ED 344, Secondary Education 
IE 310, Industrial Safety 
PSY 304, Educational Psychology 
SOC 401, Human Relations in 
Industrial Society 
Elective 



Credits 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 
ED 422, Methods of Teaching 

Industrial Subjects 4 

ENG English Elective 3 
PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 2 

REC 333, First Aid and Safety 2 

Elective 9 

20 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ED 440, Vocational Education 

ED 444, Student Teaching in 

Industrial Subjects 
ED 483, Instructional Aids and 

Devices 
ED 525, Trade Analysis and 

Course Construction 

Elective 



Credits 
2 



Spring Semester 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 

ED 516, Community Occupational 

Surveys 
ED 527, Philosophy of Industrial 

Education 
PSY 337, Industrial Psychology 

Elective 



16 



* A minimum of 136 semester credits required for graduation. 



MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 



Associate Professor Herbert E. Speece 
Assistant Professor Henry A. Shannon 



Credits 
2 



17 



Objectives — The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers 
curricula for those students who wish to become teachers of mathematics 
or science. Each curriculum provides for a well rounded professional 
preparation. There is sufficient flexibility in each curriculum to enable 
the student to meet certification requirements in both subject matter areas 
by proper selection of elective courses. This flexibility also enables the 
student to specialize in one subject matter area thus opening up job op- 
portunities in related fields requiring a substantial background in mathe- 
matics and science, such as research teams in industry, government re- 
search projects involving rockets, guided missiles, computers or pure 
research. 

Opportunities — The acute shortage of mathematics and science teachers 
in the secondary schools provides excellent employment opportunities for 
more graduates in this department. Attractive job opportunities are also 
available for industrial employment. The rapid technological and scientific 



98 



School Of Education 



developments during the past few years have accentuated the importance 
of mathematics and science. Future developments will depend upon the 
accomplishments of persons who have received adequate training in these 
areas. 



MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CURRICULUM^ 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 
ENG 111, Composition 

History Elective 
MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 
MS 101, Military Science 

or 
AS 121, Air Science 
PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 
3 
3 
5 



Spring Semester 

CH 103, General and Qualitative 

Chemistry 
ENG 112, Composition 
MA 102, Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus I 
MA 122, Mathematics of Finance 

and Elementary Statistics 
MS 102, Military Science 

or 
AS 122, Air Science 
PE 102, Physical Education 



Credits 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ED 203, Introduction to Teaching 

MA 201, Calculus II 

PY 211, Physics 

SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 

MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 
Electives 



Credits 


Spring Semester 


Cred 


2 


BO 103, General Botany 




4 


or 




4 


ZO 103, General Zoology 


4 


3 


MA 202, Calculus III 


4 




PY 212, Physics 


4 




MS 202, Military Science 




1 


or 




1 


AS 222, Air Science 


1 


3 


PE 202, Physical Education 


1 


— 


Electives 


3 



18 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EC 205, Economic Process 3 

PS 201, The American Governmental 

System 3 

PSY 304, Educational Psychology 3 

Electives 10 

19 



Spring Semester 
CE 201, Surveying 

or 
PY 223, Astronomy 
ED 344, Secondary Education 
English Elective 
♦♦Electives 



Credits 

3 
2 

3 
10 

18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ED 470, Methods of Teaching Math 

♦♦♦ED 471, Student Teaching in 

Math 
ED 472, Developing and Selecting 

Teaching Materials in Math 
PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 



Credits 
3 



Spring Semester 
ED 420, Principles of Guidance 
MA 433, History of Math 
♦♦Electives 

English Elective 



Credits 
2 
3 
9 
3 

17 



13 



* A minimum of 136 semester credits required for graduation. 

*♦ A minimum of 6 semester hour electives in mathematics and 3 semester hours in 

mathematics or physical science. All electives must be selected with approval of adviser. 

'** During the fall semester of the Senior year 12 weeks will be devoted to full-time 

off-campus work at an approved Student Teaching Center and approximately 6 weeks 

to concentrated courses. 



School Of Education 
SCIENCE EDUCATION CURRICULUM* 



99 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
ZO 103, General Zoology 
History Elective 
MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 
ENG 111, Composition 
MS 101, Military Science 

or 
AS 121, Air Science 
PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 
3 
4 
3 



16 



Spring Semester 

ZO 205, Invertebrate Zoology 

MA 112, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 
BO 103, General Botany 
ENG 112, Composition 
MS 102, Miltiary Science 

or 
AS 122, Air Science 
PE 102, Physical Education 



Credits 

4 

4 
4 

3 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

BO 301, General Morphology 

or 
BO 403, Systematic Botany 3 

CH 101, General Inorganic Chemistry 4 
PS 201, The American Governmental 

System 8 

SOS 202, Principles of Sociology 3 

MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 1 

PE 201. Physical Education 1 

**Electives 3 

18 



Spring Semester 

MIG 120, Physical Geology 

CH 103, General and Qualitative 

Chemistry 
ED 203, Introduction to Teaching 
ZO 213, Human Fhysiology 
MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 
PE 202, Physical Education 

**Electives 



Credits 



17 



Fall Semester 

CH 203, General and Organic 

Chemistry 
EC 205, The Economic Process 
ED 344, Secondary Education 
PY 211, Physics 

English Elective 
**Electives 



JUNIOR YEAR 




edits Spring Semester 


Credits 


PSY 304, Educational Psychology 
4 PY 212, Physics 
3 **Electives 
2 
4 
3 
3 


3 

4 

11 

18 



19 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 475, Methods of Teaching 

in Science 3 

***ED 476, Student Teaching 

in Science 6 

ED 477, Developing and Selecting 

Teaching Materials in 

Science 2 

PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 2 

13 



Spring Semester 
PY 223, Astronomy 
BO 312, General Bacteriology 
ED 420, Principles of Guidance 
•♦Elective 

English Elective 



Credits 
3 
4 
2 
6 
3 

18 



* A minimum of 136 semester credits required for graduation. 
*• A minimum of 6 semester hour electives in one area of Science. All electives must 
be selected with approval of adviser. 
*** During the fall semester of the senior year 12 weeks will be devoted to full-time off- 
campus work at an approved Student Training Center and approximately 6 weeks to 
concentrated courses. 



100 School Of Education 

RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 



Professor Thomas I. Hines, Head of Department 

Associate Professor Latham L. Miller 

Assistant Professors Charles C. Stott, Albert Crawford 



Objectives — The Department of Recreation and Park Administration 
provides training for students who plan to become recreation leaders in 
industry, municipalities, institutions and rural communities. The recreation 
profession recognizes the importance of leaders who possess the competence 
needed to plan and supervise effective recreation programs. Competent 
leadership is the major factor affecting the scope, intensity and success 
of a program of organized recreation. A curriculum in park administration 
is offered for students who plan to engage in the administration of local, 
county or state parks. 

All students pursue the same program for the first year after which 
they declare an option (employee, public, or institutional recreation or 
park administration) and take courses designed to meet the needs in their 
respective area of specialization. 

Opportunities — The demand of properly trained recreation leadership 
has increased rapidly in recent years. The number of graduates has not 
been sufficient to meet the demand for recreation leaders. 



RECREATION ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 111, Composition 

History Elective 
REC 152, Introduction to 

Recreation 
ZO 103, General Zoology 
MS 101, Military Science I 

or 
AS 121, Air Science I 
PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 



15 



Spring Semester 

BO 103, General Botany 

ENG 112, Composition 

PS 201, American Governmental 

System 
REC 153, Aquatic Sports 
SOC 202, Principles of Sociology 
MS 102, Military Science I 

or 
AS 122, Air Science I 
PE 102, Physical Education 



Credits 
4 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EC 205, The Economic Process 3 
MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

REC 201, Playground Leadership 2 

REC 251, Social Recreation I 3 

ZO 212, Human Anatomy 3 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 215, Principles of News 

Writing 8 

MA 122, Mathematics of Finance 
and Elementary Statistics 
or 
EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 4 
PSY 200, Introduction of Psychology 3 
REC 253, Principles of Physical 

Education 8 

ZO 213, Human Physiology 3 

MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 

18 



School Of Education 



101 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 
REC 338, First Aid and Safety 
REC 351, Individual Sports in 

Recreation 
REC 354, Personal and Community 

Hygiene 
••Electives 



Credits 
8 
2 



Spring Semester Credits 

REC 352, Team Sports in Recreation 8 
REC 353, Camp Organization and 

Leadership 8 

SOC 301, Human Behavior 8 

**Electives 

18 



13 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

REC 451, Facilities and 

Equipment 
REC 452, Recreation Administration 
REC 471, Organizing the Recreation 

Program 
SOC 416, Research Methods 
••Electives 



Credits 



18 



Spring Semester 
REC 470, Supervised Practice 
REC 472, Observation and Field 
Experience 
••Electives 



Credits 



IS 



* A minimum of 139 semester credits required for graduation. 
••At the end of the sophomore year, a student must select an area of special interest. At 
least 21 semester hours of course work must be taken from the list of elective courses 
in the chosen area. 

Field Work : Evidence of at least four months of satisfactory experience in the practice 
of his profession is required for graduation. 



EMPLOYEE RECREATION ELECTIVE COURSES 



Credits 

EC 315, Salesmanship 2 

EC 401, Principles of Accounting 3 

EC 402, Principles of Accounting 3 

EC 407, Business Law I 8 

EC 411, Marketing Methods 8 

EC 412, Sales Management 8 

EC 420, Corporation Finance 8 

EC 425, Industrial Management 8 

EC 426, Personnel Management 3 

EC 431, Labor Problems 3 

EC 432, Industrial Relations 8 

ED 308, Visual Aids 2 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 2 

ENG 211, Business Communications 8 



Credits 
IA 314, Recreation Arts and Crafts 2 
PSY 302, Psychology of Personality 

and Adjustment 3 

PSY 337, Industrial Psychology I 
PSY 438, Industrial Psychology II 
PSY 490, Social Psychology 
REC 252, Social Recreation II 
REC 401, Principles and Practices 

of Industrial Recreation 
SOC 302, Public Relations and 

Modern Society 
SOC 305, Race Relations 
SOC 401, Human Relations in 

Industrial Society 
SOC 501, Leadership 



3 



PUBLIC RECREATION ELECTIVE COURSES 



EC 407, Business Law I 

EC 426, Personnel Management 

ED 308, Visual Aids 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 

ENG 211, Business Communications 

HRT 222, Introduction to 

Horticulture 
HRT 342, Landscape Gardening 
IA 314, Recreation Arts and Crafts 
PS 202, County and Municipal 

Government 
PS 502, Public Administration 
PS 510, Public Finance 
PSY 302, Psychology of Personality 

and Adjustment 
PSY 304, Educational Psychology 
PSY 476, Psychology of Adolescence 
REC 203, Individual Corrective 

Physical Education 
REC 207, History and Principles of 

Park Administration 
REC 252, Social Recreation II 
REC 301, Organization and Admin- 
istration of Physical 
Education 



Credits 
3 



Credits 



REC 315, Prevention and Care of 

Athletic Injuries 
REC 325, Activities for the Handi- 
capped Individual 
REC 401, Principles and Practices 

of Industrial Recreation 
REC 404, Principles and Practices 

of Rural Recreation 
REC 411, Park Maintenance and 

Operation I 
REC 412, Park Maintenance and 

Operation II 
SOC 302, Public Relations and 

Modern Society 
SOC 304, Contemporary Family Life 
SOC 305, Race Relations 
SOC 306, Delinquency and Crime 
SOC 402, Urban Sociology 
SOC 411, Community Relationships 
SOC 501, Leadership 
ZO 312, Principles of Game 

Management 
ZO 321, Wildlife and Natural 
Resource Conservation 



102 



School Of Education 



INSTITUTIONAL RECREATION ELECTIVE COURSES 



Credits 
3 



EC 407, Business Law I 

EC 426, Personnel Management 

ED 308, Visual Aids 2 

ED 420, Principles of Guidance 2 

ENG 211, Business Communications 3 

I A 314, Recreation Arts and Crafts 2 

PHI 305, Philosophy of Religion 3 

PS 202, County and Municipal 

Government 3 

PS 502, Public Administration 3 

PS 510, Public Finance 3 
PSY 302, Psychology of Personality 

and Adjustment 8 

PSY 304, Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 307, General Applied Psychology 2 

PSY 490, Social Psychology 3 

PSY 530, Abnormal Psychology 3 
REC 203, Individual Corrective 

Physical Education 2 



REC 252, Social Recreation II 

REC 301, Organization and Admin- 
istration of Physical 
Education 

REC 315, Prevention and Care of 
Athletic Injuries 

REC 325, Activities for the Handi- 
capped Individual 

REC 401, Principles and Practices 
of Industrial Recreation 

REC 404, Principles and Practices 
of Rural Recreation 

SOC 302, Public Relations and 
Modern Society 

SOC 304, Contemporary Family Life 

SOC 305, Race Relations 

SOC 306, Delinquency and Crime 

SOC 402, Urban Sociology 

SOC 411, Community Relationships 

SOC 501, Leadership 



Credits 
8 



PARK ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 



Freshman year same as for Recreation Administration 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

AGE 201, Agriculture Construction 

and Maintenance I 2 

BO 211, Dendrology 2 

ENG 215, Principles of News 

Writing 8 

MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry 4 
REC 207, History and Principles 

of Park Administration 2 

REC 251, Social Recreation I 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

AGE 202, Agriculture Construction 

and Maintenance II 2 

EC 205, Economic Process 3 

MA 122, Math of Finance and 
Elementary Statistics 
or 
EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 3 
PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 3 
ZO 206, Vertebrate Zoology 4 

MS 202, Military Science II 



AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 



18 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Credits 



Fall Semester 
MIG 120, Physical Geology 3 

REC 333, First Aid and Safety 2 

REC 352, Team Sports in Recreation 3 
'•Electives 10 



IS 



Spring Semester 
BO 403, Systematic Botany 
ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 
♦Electives 



Credits 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 441, Plant Ecology 

REC 353, Camp Organization and 

Leadership 
REC 411, Park Maintenance and 

Operation I 
REC 452, Recreation Administration 
REC 471, Organizing the Recreation 

Program 
♦Electives 



Credits 
3 



Spring Semester Credits 

REC 354, Personal and Community 

Hygiene 3 
REC 412, Park Maintenance and 

Operation II 2 

REC 451, Facilities and Equipment 3 

ZO 522, Animal Ecology 3 

♦Electives 7 

18 



18 



School Of Education 



103 



ELECTIVE COURSES 



AGE 341, Farm Electrification 

and Utilities 
EC 426, Personnel Management 
ENG 211, Business Communications 
HRT 222, Introduction to 

Horticulture 
HRT 301, Plant Propagation 
HRT 342. Landscape Gardening 
PS 202, County and Municipal 

Government 
rs 502, Public Administration 
PS 510, Public Finance 
PSY 302, Psychology of 

Personality 
PSY 490, Social Psychology 



Credit* 

3 
S 
3 



SOC 402, Urban Sociology 

SOC 411, Community Relationship 

SOC 416, Research Methods 

SOC 501, Leadership 

REC 252, Social Recreation II 

REC 351, Individual Sports in 

Recreation 
REC 404, Principles and Practices 

of Rural Recreation 
ZO 312, Principles of Game 

Management 
ZO 321, Wildlife and Natural 

Resource Conservation 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



• At least 21 semester hours of course work must be taken from the list of elective courses. 
Field Work : Evidence of at least four months of satisfactory experience in the practice 
of his profession is required for graduation. 



OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 



Professor Roy X. Anderson, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor Charles G. Morehead 



Objectives — Special facilities are provided in the School of Education 
for mature students and individuals who have had teaching or personnel 
experience and who hold a Bachelor's degree to enroll for courses leading 
to a Master's degree in occupational information and guidance, or a Master 
of Science degree. The offerings of the Department of Occupational In- 
formation and Guidance permit graduate students in subject-matter fields 
to select appropriate courses which will enable them to provide guidance 
and counseling for their students as well as exert influence in promoting 
a school-wide guidance program. 

In addition to the graduate program, the department provides instruction 
in guidance for undergraduate students in the School of Education. 

Opportunities — Graduate work in occupational information and guidance 
gives preparation for such positions as counselor in secondary schools, 
colleges or community agencies; school guidance director; employment 
counselor; placement worker; business or industrial personnel worker; and 
for personnel work in the State or Federal Government. Administrators, 
supervisors, directors of instruction and others who wish to prepare them- 
selves for positions of leadership in guidance work may also profit from 
this program. 

Graduate Study — The program for the Master's Degree for school coun- 
selors meets the North Carolina School Counselors Certificate requirement. 
The graduate program for each student is determined by his needs, interests, 
educational background, and work experience. It would include a core of 
guidance courses as follows: ED 420, Principles of Guidance; ED 524, 
Occupational and Educational Information; ED 530, Group Guidance; ED 
533, Administrative Relationships of Guidance Program; ED 631, Educa- 
tional and Vocational Guidance; ED 633, Techniques in Guidance and 
Personnel; ED 641, Field Work (Supervised Practicum); ED 651, Research. 
Opportunity for field work is available in secondary schools, colleges, clinics, 
employment offices, and other agencies, according to the student's interests. 
Courses in psychology, sociology, economics, and education are selected to 
round out the program. 



104 School Of Education 

PSYCHOLOGY 



Professor Howard G. Miller, Head of the Department 

Professors Key L. Barkley, Harold M. Corter 

Associate Professors John 0. Cook, J. Clyde Johnson, Slater E. Newman, 

Paul J. Rust 
Assistant Professors Donald W. Drewes, Clifton W. Gray 
Visiting Professor William McGehee 

Objectives — In general, the courses in psychology are designed to pro- 
mote a broad understanding of behavior as a science and to cultivate the 
skills which may be useful in dealing with human beings in social, educa- 
tional, industrial or other situations. The department, however, offers courses 
of interest to students in all schools. 

Graduate Study — Graduate work is offered in the Department of Psychol- 
ogy leading to the Master of Science degree with options in industrial 
psychology, experimental psychology and school psychology. 



School of Engineering 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



John Harold Lampe, Dean 

Robert G. Carson, Director of Instruction 

W. E. Adams, Coordinator of Student Affairs 



The impact of science and technology on civilization imposes upon all 
of us and upon the engineer in particular, a new sense of responsibility. 
The scientist cannot guarantee that his contributions will always be 
used for noble purposes: he cannot answer for the misuse of scientific 
discoveries by dictators who would enslave the human race. But he can 
supply the knowledge and tools for building a better world and the de- 
fenses for its preservation. To be an engineer thus carries with it the 
responsibility and the obligation to use all newly discovered knowledge for 
the benefit of mankind. Discovery leads to discovery; knowledge opens the 
way to more knowledge, making possible further enlightenment and a new 
age of plenty. 

Engineering studies are of the utmost interest and importance to those 
young men and women who look to industry, engineering education, or re- 
search for a career. These ambitions can well be furthered by the School of 
Engineering through its undergraduate or graduate programs, whereby stu- 
dents are offered technical instruction and leadership guidance by an 
experienced staff of qualified engineers and educators. 

The School of Engineering is organized into eight engineering depart- 
ments: Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Mechanical, Mineral In- 
dustries, Mechanics, and Research. A committee also administers a nuclear 
engineering program. Undergraduate degree programs are offered in the 
first six named departments and in nuclear engineering. All the teaching 
departments offer advanced studies leading to a professional degree or to 
the Master's degree. The Doctor of Philosophy program is offered in 
ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical and nuclear engineering. 

It is the policy of the School of Engineering to have all its curricula 
more than meet the standards of the Engineers' Council for Professional 
Development. It is the ambition of the school that this curricula and pro- 
grams meet the needs of the people and industries of the state and region 
through effective instruction, competent research and development, and 
worthwhile scientific contributions to engineering knowledge. 

Curricula — The curricula representing the study program in all of the 
departments are so arranged that the freshman year is common to all. 
They contain broadening courses in the humanities while emphasizing the 
basic and fundamental engineering principles so essential to an engineering 
college program. Graduates of this program will not only be prepared for 
engineering responsibilities and positions of trust in industry, but will also 
have an appreciation and consciousness of human problems in community 
and industrial life. Though an entering student is asked to designate a 
field of interest, he can with ease and without any interruption change to 
some other field of study within the School of Engineering at the end of 
the freshman year. 

Four-Year Bachelor's Curricula and Professional (Fifth Year) Study — 
The four-year program provides education and training to meet the needs 
of from eighty to eighty-five per cent of the young men of North Carolina 
who will take their places in industry and industrial life in the fields of 
production, sales, application, planning and the operation of small indus- 
trial units. 



108 School Of Engineering 

The fifth -year specialized training leads to a professional degree (CE, 
CHE, ME, EE, and so forth) in ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, geologi- 
cal industrial and mechanical engineering. The courses of study are es- 
pecially designed to meet the needs of students desiring intensive special- 
ization in a particular field or additional course work not ordinarily 
covered in the normal four-year undergraduate curricula. 

Graduate Study — The graduate activities are patterned to provide ad- 
vanced training and experience to young men who have successfully com- 
pleted a four-year program and who have an interest and ability to 
continue their education. This elective program will train graduates for 
positions and activities in teaching, technical design and research. The 
Engineering School offers two programs of graduate study. The first 
represents a year of full-time study and thesis work and leads to a degree 
of Master of Science in some field of engineering. The second program 
leads to a Doctor's degree in some field of engineering and usually re- 
quires three years of full-time study, thesis work and experimental 
activity. 

Research — Research activities in the School of Engineering are based 
on a program correlated with graduate study in engineering. It is the 
purpose of this program not only to train future research workers, but 
also to carry out a program that assures both sound investigations of 
a fundamental nature in engineering sciences and work devoted to greater 
uses of the state's natural resources. Through publications, cooperative 
activity with industry and the operation of our own investigational pro- 
jects, it is intended that the engineering research activities will be a part 
of and work effectively with the industrial development of North Carolina. 

Degrees — Bachelor of Science in Engineering — The four-year curricula 
offer programs of study leading to a Bachelor's degree in agricultural, 
ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, geological, industrial, mechanical, metal- 
lurgical and nuclear engineering. Aeronautical engineering is an option in 
mechanical engineering, and construction engineering is an option in civil 
engineering. Graduation requirements are the satisfactory completion of all 
the required courses in any one curriculum and other courses which amount 
to a minimum of 146 semester credit hours. A minimum scholastic record 
of a C average is also required. 

Nuclear Engineering — Problems in nuclear engineering fall into several 
areas, including instrumentation and control, power, materials, processing 
and processes, and waste disposal. The electives available to the student 
offer an opportunity for the undergraduate to specialize in nuclear prob- 
lems. For example, a student in electrical engineering may take several 
courses during his junior and senior years which can provide background 
and application of electrical engineering to reactor problems. Other 
examples would be power application by the mechanical engineering 
student, processing and processes by the chemical engineering student, 
reactor materials by the metallurgical engineering student or the ceramic 
engineering student, or waste disposal by the civil engineering student. 
The student is referred to the announcements of the individual departments 
for further information. 

Graduate studies in nuclear engineering may be pursued in any ap- 
propriate department in the School of Engineering, thus providing for 
a number of fields of specialization. 

Specialized Degree — Specialized Bachelor of Science degree is also 
offered through a program of study in furniture manufacturing and man- 
agement. The course is planned for four years of study. Graduation re- 
quirements are the satisfactory completion of all the required courses and 
other courses which amount to a minimum total of 146 semester credit 
hours. A minimum scholastic record of C average is also required. 



School Of Engineering 109 

Professional Degree in a Specialized Branch of Engineering — This is 
an earned degree which can be obtained only after the Bachelor's degree. 
The fifth-year curricula are especially designed to meet the needs of stu- 
dents desiring intensive specialization in a particular field or additional 
course work not ordinarily covered in the normal four-year undergraduate 
curricula. This professional program of study is offered in ceramic, chem- 
ical, civil, electrical, geological, industrial, mechanical, and metallurgical 
engineering. 

For further information concerning the requirements for the professional 
degree, applications for admission, etc., address Dr. J. H. Lampe, dean of 
Engineering, North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Master of Science in a Specialized Branch of Engineering — This is an 
earned graduate degree which can be obtained only after the Bachelor's 
degree. It requires at least one year of graduate work, a reading knowl- 
edge of at least one foreign language and a thesis showing ability to 
pursue independent research. The core of graduate courses taken must 
emphasize a scientific objective. Further information concerning the re- 
quirements for this degree may be obtained by addressing Director of 
Graduate Studies, State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree — This is an earned graduate degree offered 
in ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical and nuclear engineering. 
Admission requirements are the same as for the Master's degree. It requires 
at least two years of graduate work in one of these listed major programs 
and a minor either in some field of engineering or in an allied science. The 
dissertation will deal with some problem in the field of the student's major 
interest. Inquiries about this program should be addressed to Director of 
Graduate Studies, State College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Engineering — This degree is purely 
an honorary degree conferred upon men of extraordinarily high profes- 
sional engineering attainments who are graduates of one of the branches 
of the University of North Carolina, or upon professional engineers who 
have rendered distinguished services to North Carolina. 

Short Courses and Institutes — The School of Engineering cooperates 
with the College Extension Division in offering short courses and insti- 
tutes both on the campus and at various centers throughout the state for 
adults and graduate engineers. Such courses vary in length from one 
day to twelve weeks; each year the courses offered are different and vary 
according to the public demand. The faculty of the School of Engineering 
usually furnish a large portion of the instruction offered in these courses, 
which in the past have been for electrical metermen, gas plant operators, 
safety engineers, radio engineers, refrigeration and air conditioning 
engineers, waterworks operators, heating and plumbing contractors 
and surveyors. Classes are usually held in Raleigh where the School of 
Engineering has an excellent staff and adequate laboratories and class- 
room facilities available. 

These short courses offer real opportunity to practicing engineering 
personnel to follow a refresher program in their field of interest, as well 
as to become acquainted with the latest and most modern engineering 
procedures and equipment. 

Another educational services activity is that being carried out at the 
Gaston Technical Institute, Gastonia, North Carolina, where a two-year 
post-high school terminal technician program is sponsored by the School 
of Engineering and operated by the Extension Division of the college. 
A separate full-time staff is employed for this educational program which 
provides an integrated curriculum in English, mathematics, engineering 
drawing, machine shop, welding, electrical maintenance and economics. 
Graduates of this program are trained for industry with the opportunity 



110 



School Of Engineering 



for rapid acceleration towards positions of foremen, maintenance super- 
visors, etc. 

Curricula — Each of the following curricula is not only well-balanced, 
but offers a liberal course of study in a technical and professional field. 
Each conforms to what is regarded by engineering educators as the best 
modern practice. 



FRESHMAN YEAR IN ALL ENGINEERING CURRICULA 



Fall Semester 

CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry and Qualitative 

Analysis 
ENG 111, Composition 
E 100, Introduction to Engineering 
••MA 101, Algebra and 

Trigonometry 
ME 101, Engineering Graphics I 
MS 101, Military Science 

or 
AS 121, Air Science 
*PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103, General Inorganic Chemistry 

and Qualitative Analysis 4 

ENG 112, Composition 8 

EC 205, The Economic Process 



HI 205, The Modern Western World 
**MA 102, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus I 
ME 102, Engineering Graphics II 
MS 102, Military Science 



17 



AS 122, Air Science 

•PE 102, Physical Education 



18 



• Students excused from Military Science or Air Science and/or Physical Education will 
schedule equivalent credits in courses outside their department. 
•• To be eligible to roster courses taught by the School of Engineering above the fresh- 
man level, an engineering student must have earned a minimum grade of "C" on MA 102. 
The sophomore, junior, and senior programs of study in the various fields of Engineering 
are shown under the department headings on the pages that follow. 

Humanities — Social Studies Programs for Engineering Students — A 
specially designed sequence of courses comprising 21 credit hours^ is re- 
quired of all engineering students and is incorporated in each curriculum. 
Its primary objective is to broaden the student in the humanities and 
social sciences and to instill good habits in the use of the English language. 
Following a broad yet basic consideration of history, economics and liter- 
ature, the student progresses to an advanced and integrated study of 
contemporary civilization and of contemporary problems. The electives in 
the last year may be chosen from a group of approved courses which 
are built upon and closely related to the subject matter of the previous 
three years. 



Fall Semester 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits 



Spring Semester Credits 

HI 205, The Modern Western World 

or 
EC 205, The Economic Process 3 



'SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

HI 205, The Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 206, Reading for Discovery 3 

or 
EC 206, The Economic Process 



Spring Semester Credits 

HI 205, The Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

or 
EC 205, The Economic Process 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 8 



Spring Semester Credits 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 8 



School Op Engineering 111 

"senior year 

Spring Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues I SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 

or Approved Elective or Approved Elective 

(see list below) 8 (see list below) 3 

SENIOR ELECTIVES FOR HUMANITIES— SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

Credits Credit* 

SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 8 SOC 401, Human Relations in 

SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 3 Industrial Society 8 

HI 412, Recent United States PHI 395, Philosophical Analysis 3 

History 8 EC 442, Evolution of Economic 

ENG 468, Major American Writers 3 Ideas 3 

PS 401, American Parties and GN 301, Genetics in Human 

Pressure Groups 8 Affairs 8 



• History, Economics, and Literature may be scheduled in any order except that ENG 

111, 112, Composition, are prerequisite for ENG 205. Only one course can be scheduled 

without special permission. 
••The student must take either SS 491, Contemporary Issues I, or SS 492; Contemporary 

Issues II. He must select an elective from the senior electives list for the other senior 

semester. 
Courses from the approved list of senior electives will not be credited to the humanities 
sequence unless taken during the senior year. 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



A curriculum for work leading* to the Bachelor's degree in agricultural 
engineering is the joint responsibility of the School of Agriculture and 
the School of Engineering. Each of the schools gives approximately one- 
half the course work. 

For further details concerning the field, see Department of Agricultural 
Engineering in the School of Agriculture. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor E. M. Schoenborn, Head of the Department 

Professor K. O. Beatty, Jr. 

Associate Professors R. Bright, J. F. Seely, 

Assistant Professor E. R. Conway 

Instructors W. M. Cooper, S. T. Goforth, Jr., L. Lenas 

Visiting Associate Professor in Engineering Research A. A. Armstrong 

Objectives — Chemical engineering is concerned with the design of 
processes, equipment and plants in which chemical and physical transfor- 
mations of matter are carried out. Typical industries relying heavily upon 
chemical engineering include those producing chemicals, polymers, metals, 
drugs, glass, food, gasoline, paper, soap and cement; those producing 
energy from nuclear fuels; and those processing materials by methods 
involving chemical reactions. The preparation of men qualified to pursue 
careers in such industries as these is the purpose of the curriculum in 
chemical engineering. 

Curriculum — The work of the chemical engineer is extremely diversified 
and consequently his education must be along broad and basic lines. The 
spirit of research and experimentation is a vital part of the chemical 



112 School Of Engineering 

industry and even those in the undergraduate curriculum need to acquire 
the sound scientific background essential to original thought and inde- 
pendent accomplishment. The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes the 
engineering, the chemical and the economic principles involved in chemical 
processes and operations. The work in chemistry including inorganic, an- 
alytical, physical, and organic chemistry is comparable to that usually 
given to chemists in the first three years with the exception of a reduction 
of time devoted to laboratory work. The subjects in mechanical and elect- 
rical engineering, in mechanics and metallurgy are designed to supply the 
fundamentals of these branches. The work in the chemical engineering 
subjects, although distinctly professional in application, is nevertheless 
basic in character. Since it depends upon a thorough background in the 
sciences, it is postponed until the third and fourth years. It is designed 
to develop initiative, sound habits of thought and intellectual curiosity 
in the student. 

Chemical engineers have played the single biggest role in the atomic 
energy field. The future of production of nuclear fuels, the operation and 
design of reactors, and the procession of irradiated materials presents a 
multitude of chemical engineering problems. By judicious use of his elec- 
tives, the student in chemical engineering may obtain specialized knowledge 
in the area of nuclear engineering. 

Facilities — The Chemical Engineering Laboratories are provided with 
pilot plant-type equipment for studying the principles of fluid flow, heat 
transfer, distillation, absorption, drying, crushing and grinding, filtration, 
agitation, etc. Much new equipment has been installed, and new and special 
apparatus is added from time to time to keep the facilities abreast of 
recent developments in the field. Special equipment for research and in- 
structional purposes is designed and built in the departmental laboratories. 
In this way students are given first hand acquaintance with problems 
relating to the actual design, construction, and operation of typical equip- 
ment used in industry. 

Opportunities — Opportunities for employment in the chemical, atomic 
energy, and allied fields upon graduation are numerous and varied. Grad- 
autes find employment in such fields as: research and development; pro- 
duction, operation, and maintenance; management and administration; 
inspection, testing, and process control; technical service and sales; esti- 
mation and specification writing; consulting and teaching, and many others. 
Students desiring to pursue careers in research and development or in 
teaching and consulting work are strongly advised to consider training. 
In fact, the need for persons who have had advanced training in the field 
beyond the regular four-year program is continually increasing. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CHE 205, Chemical Process CHE 311, Introductory Chemical 

Principles 4 Engineering 4 

♦EC 205, The Economic Process *ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 EC 205, The Economic Process 3 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 Calculus in 4 

PY 201, General Physics 6 PY 202, General Physics 6 

MS 201, Military Science n MS 202, Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

18 18 



School Of Engineering 



113 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 
CH 531, Physical Chemistry 
CHE 411, Unit Operations I 
EM 341, Engineering Mechanics A 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
8 

18 



Spring Semester 
CH 532, Physical Chemistry 
CHE 412, Unit Operations II 
EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 
EM 342, Engineering Mechanics B 
EM 343, Strength of Materials A 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 

Elective 



Credits 



SENIOR YEAR 



* See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM (Typical Program) 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 401, Special Topics in Inorganic 

Chemistry 3 

CHE 570, Chemical Engineering 

Projects 2 

CHE 610, Heat Transfer I 3 

CHE 660, Chemical Engineering 

Seminar 1 

PY 407, Introduction to Modern 

Physics 8 

Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester 

CHE 525, Process Measurement 

and Control 
CHE 546, Chemical Reaction 

Rates 
CHE 570, Chemical Engineering 

Projects 
CHE 613, Distillation 
CHE 660, Chemical Engineering 

Seminar 

Elective 



20 



Fall Semester 


Credits 


Spring Semester 


Crea 


CH 425, Organic Chemistry 


3 


CH 426, Organic Chemistry 


3 


CHE 415, Chemical Engineering 




CHE 432, Unit Operations Lab II 


3 


Thermodynamics 


4 


CHE 525, Process Measurement 




CHE 431, Unit Operations Lab I 


3 


and Control 


3 


CHE 460, Seminar 


1 


MIM 321, Metallurgy 


3 


CHE 527, Chemical Process 




*SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 




Engineering 


3 


or 




*SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 




Elective in Humanities 


3 


or 




Elective 


3 


Elective in Humanities 


8 




— 


Elective 


8 
20 




18 



Credits 



Graduate Study — Regulations governing the Professional Program are 
shown on pages 138,139 and 140. 

Graduate work is offered in chemical engineering leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in chemical engineering. 
Superior students who can do so are strongly encouraged to spend one or 
more years in advanced study and research since the demand of the chem- 
ical industry for persons with training beyond the baccalaureate is con- 
tinually increasing. 

The chemical engineering staff and research facilities provide unusual 
opportunities for basic and applied work in such important fields as fluid 
flow, heat transfer, distillation, diffusional operations, plastic technology. 
Of current interests are special programs in thermal properties of materials 
at both high and low temperatures, in process measurement and control, 
the use of radioactive tracers in chemical engineering research, and con- 
densation in a centrifugal force field. 

For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog should be consulted. 



114 School Of Engineering 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Professor R. E. Fadum, Head of Department 

Professors C. R. Bramer, C. R. McCullough, Carroll L. Mann, Jr., C. Small- 
wood, Jr., M. E. Uyanik 

Associate Professor M. V. Smirnoff 

Assistant Professors Michael Amein, R. H. Bigelow, E. P. Brantly, P. D. 
Cribbins, J. W. Horn, H. E. Wahls 

Instructors L. S. Agnew, Jr., C. P. Fisher, R. M. Istrabadi, J. C. Smith, J. R. 
Walton 



Definition of Civil Engineering — Civil engineering is one of the broadest 
of the various fields of engineering. It deals with the planning, design and 
construction of buildings, bridges, dams, harbor works, water works, 
water power facilities, sewage disposal works, nuclear waste facilities, 
and transportation facilities including highways, railways, waterways, 
airports, and pipe lines. The civil engineer's services are in demand by 
public agencies as well as by private enterprise. The activities of the 
civil engineer are such that opportunities are available for office type as 
well as field-type employment and for employment in small communities 
as well as in large industrial centers. The breadth in scope of civil en- 
gineering and the variety of types of employment open to the civil engi- 
neer are such that a student who does not have a strong predilection for 
some special branch of engineering may be safely advised to study civil 
engineering. 

Objectives — It is the primary mission of the Civil Engineering Department 
to offer programs of study designed to provide adequate academic prepar- 
ation to those contemplating a career in the civil engineering profession. 
To this end, course work at both the baccalaureate and graduate levels 
is offered. The undergraduate program is designed to provide a sound gen- 
eral education and at the same time to prepare the student for advanced 
study in engineering either by the continuation of formal education at the 
graduate level or by self-study. 

Facilities — The Department of Civil Engineering is located in Mann 
Hall. This building provides offices, drafting rooms, and classrooms, as 
well as laboratory facilities for testing structural materials, soils and 
bituminous products; for hydraulic experiments; for studies in airphoto 
interpretation and photogrammetry; for analysis of structural models; 
for chemical and biological tests pertaining to sanitary engineering; and 
for the investigation of transportation problems. In addition, the facilities 
of Mann Hall include a comfortable student study room, an auditorium 
and a departmental library. All of these facilities have been designed to 
provide for effective teaching and laboratory instruction and to create a 
scholarly environment. 

Undergraduate Curriculum — The Department of Civil Engineering offers 
two four-year undergraduate curricula: the one, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in civil engineering; the other, to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in civil engineering, construction option. 

The civil engineering curriculum has been accredited by the Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development. It is a well-balanced program of 
study providing academic discipline in the pure and applied physical 
sciences, the humanities and social sciences, and the professional aspects 
of civil engineering including structural, transportation, and sanitary 
engineering. 



School Of Engineering 
CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



115 



For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



Fall Semester 

CE 201, Surveying I 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
•EC 205, The Economic Process 

or 
ENG 205, Reading: for Discovery 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 
8 

4 
6 



17 



Spring Semester 

CE 202, Surveying II 

EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 
PY 202, General Physics 
•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or 
EC 205, The Economic Process 
MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 
PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
8 

4 

5 



20 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 305, Transportation Engineer- 
ing I 
CE 321, Materials Testing 

Laboratory I 
EM 312, Mechanics II (Dynamics) 
EM 321, Strength of Materials I 
MA 301, Differential Equations I 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 



20 



Spring Semester 

CE 306, Transportation Engineer- 
ing II 

CE 322, Materials Testing 
Laboratory II 

CE 324, Structural Analysis I 

CE 382, Hydraulics 

ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 



3 
3 
3 

20 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 425, Structural Analysis II 
CE 427, Structural Design I 
CE 442, Soil Mechanics 
CE 481, Hydrology and Drainage 
CE 492, Professional Practice I 
•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 

Elective in Humanities 

Elective 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 

2 

1 



19 



Spring Semester 

CE 428, Structural Design II 

CE 482, Water and Sewage Works 

CE 493, Professional Practice II 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 
•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Elective in Humanities 

Electives 



Credits 
8 
3 
1 



17 



* See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Construction Option— Professor Carroll L. Mann, Jr., In Charge— The 
curriculum in civil engineering construction option is designed to suit 
the needs of students who are especially interested in the construction 
phases of civil engineering. It includes the core course requirements in 
the physical sciences and the social sciences and humanities as established 
for all engineering curricula offered at North Carolina State College. It 
differs from the civil engineering curriculum in that special emphasis 
is given to the construction aspects of civil engineering. To this end the 
curriculum includes a four-semester sequence of courses in estimates and 
costs and construction planning and organization. The courses unique to 
this curriculum are designed to provide academic discipline in the en- 
gineering, planning, and management aspects of construction. 



116 School Of Engineering 

CONSTRUCTION OPTION CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 201, Surveying I 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
•EC 205, The Economic Process 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Fall Semester 

CE 321, Materials Testing 

Laboratory I 
CE 361, Estimates and Costs I 
EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 
EM 312, Mechanics II (Dynamics) 
EM 321, Strength of Materials I 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 

Elective 



'redits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 


CE 202, Surveying II 


3 




EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 


3 


4 


MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 




6 


Calculus III 


4 




PY 202, General Physics 


6 




•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 




3 


or 






EC 205, The Economic Process 


3 




MS 202, Military Science II 




1 


or 




1 


AS 222, Air Science II 


1 


— 


PE 202, Physical Education 


1 


17 




20 


JUNIOR 


YEAR 




'redits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 




CE 322, Materials Testing 




2 


Laboratory II 


2 


3 


CE 324, Structural Analysis I 


3 



CE 362, Estimates and Costs II 
EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 
ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



21 



3 
3 
3 

20 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 427, Structural Design I 

CE 461, Project Planning and 

Control I 3 

CE 485, Elements of Hydraulics and 

Hydrology 3 

CE 492, Professional Practice I 1 

•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 

Elective in Humanities 3 

Elective 3 



Credits Spring Semester Credits 

4 CE 429, Structural Design HI 8 

CE 443, Foundations 3 
3 CE 462, Project Planning and 

Control II 8 

CE 464, Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 

•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 

or 

Elective in Humanities 3 

Elective 8 



18 



17 
* See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Professional Study in Civil Engineering — Fifth-year programs of study 
leading to the professional degree of Civil Engineer are offered in the 
following specialty fields: sanitary engineering, soil mechanics and foun- 
dation engineering, structural engineering and transportation engineering. 
The fifth-year curricula, which are made up of advanced course work, 
are offered as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program and 
are designed for students who are desirous of becoming technically profi- 
cient in one of the specialty fields of civil engineering. The following cur- 
ricula are illustrative of the fifth-year programs of study. It is to be 
understood, however, that a curriculum for a given student is designed in 
consultation with his adviser to suit his particular interests. 

Regulations governing the Professional Program are shown on pages 
138, 139 and 140. 



School Of Engineering 



117 



SANITARY ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



PROFESSIONAL 



Fall Semester 

CE 671, Theory of Water and 

Sewage Treatment 
CE 673, Analysis of Water and 

Sewage 
CE 598, Civil Engineering Projects 
CE 671, Advanced Water Supply 

and Sewerage 

Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

CE 672, Unit Operations and 

Processes in Sanitary 

Engineering 
CE 598, Civil Engineering Projects 
CE 672, Advanced Water and 

Sewage Treatment 

Electives 



Credits 



15 



15 



SOIL MECHANICS AND FOUNDATION ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 

CE 607, Airphoto Analysis I 

CE 621, Advanced Structural 

Analysis I 
CE 641, Advanced Soil Mechanics 
MA 405, Introduction to Deter- 
minants and Matrices 
Elective 



PROFESSIONAL 



Credits 
8 



15 



Spring Semester 

CE 524, Analysis and Design of 

Masonry Structures 
CE 644, Foundation Engineering 
CE 648, Soil Testing for 

Engineering Purposes 
CE 643, Hydraulics of Ground 

Water 

Elective 



Credits 

3 
3 



16 



STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

PROFESSIONAL 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 621, Advanced Structural Design I 8 
CE 621, Advanced Structural 

Analysis I 3 

EM 551, Advanced Strength of 

Materials 3 

MA 405, Introduction to Determni- 

nents and Matrices 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester 

CE 622, Advanced Structural 

Design II 
CE 644, Foundation Engineering 
CE 622, Advanced Structural 

Analysis II 
EM 602, Theoretical and Applied 

Elasticity 

Elective 



Credits 



15 



TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

PROFESSIONAL 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 516, Transportation Operations 3 
CE 616, Transportation Design 3 

CE 603, Airport Planning and 

Design 8 

Electives 6 



15 



Spring Semester 

CE 601, Transportation Planning 

CE 602, Advanced Transportation 

Design 
CE 604, Urban Transportation 

Planning 

Electives 



Credits 
8 



15 



Graduate Study in Civil Engineering— The graduate degrees offered by 
the Civil Engineering Department are the Master of Science in civil 
engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy. At North Carolina State College, 
facilities for research and graduate instruction are available in the areas 
of sanitary engineering, soil mechanics and foundation engineering, struct- 



118 School Of Engineering 

ural engineering and transportation engineering. For additional infor- 
mation concerning graduate study opportunities in civil engineering, the 
current issue of the Graduate School Catalog of North Carolina State College 
should be consulted. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor G. B. Hoadley, Head of the Department 

Professors W. J. Barclay, J. H. Lampe, W. D. Stevenson, Jr. 

Associate Professors N. R. Bell, K. B. Glenn, A. J. Goetze, E. G. Manning, 

W. C. Peterson, E. W. Winkler 
Adjunct Assistant Professor W. P. Seagraves 
Instructors J. C. Dowdle, D. I. Fairbanks, F. L. Thurstone, R. L. Thurstone, 

T. B. Smiley, C. H. Voss, Jr. 

Objectives — The purpose of the undergraduate curriculum is to train 
young people, either for active work in a challenging and diversified field, 
or for further study on the graduate level. To achieve this a thorough 
grounding is given in engineering science, followed by a solid foundation 
in fundamental electrical theory, and by advanced subject matter of suf- 
ficient breadth to insure adequate preparation for a dynamic profession. 
This background is essential for success, whether the particular field be 
automatic control, computers, communications, telemetering, electronics, 
the design of electrical equipment, the manufacture of electrical equipment, 
electric power production, the utilization of electric power, electronics in 
medicine, instrumentation or any other one of the vital fast developing 
fields using electricity either as muscles or as nerves. 

Curriculum — The curriculum in electrical engineering includes com- 
prehensive training in mathematics and physics — the fundamental sciences — 
and adequate training in allied branches of engineering. Most courses are 
accompanied by coordinated work in the laboratory and drill in the ap- 
plication of theory by means of carefully planned problems. 

Each student has a choice of two out of eight senior elective courses 
in the department, and also has a choice of four courses from any of the 
offerings at State College. Near the end of the sophomore year, each stu- 
dent is asked to consider his electives and to plan a coordinated program 
of courses suited to his particular needs and interests. 

Examinations are given each week to sophomore students in the electri- 
cal engineering course. In the junior year, examinations are given every 
three weeks, and in the senior year, they are given about every five weeks. 
This decreasing frequency of examinations is intended to encourage the 
student to assume more and more responsibility for the success of his own 
program. 

Facilities — The Electrical Engineering Department is housed in Daniels 
Hall. In addition to offices and classrooms this building provides labora- 
tories for the study of servomechanisms and control, electronics and com- 
munications, circuits, instrumentation, illumination, and electrical machine- 
ry. There are also a student study room, a shop, and a number of research 
laboratories. 

Also available to the student are the services of an IBM 650 computer 
for research. 

Graduation Requirements — Requirements for graduation are passing 
grades in the courses listed in the electrical engineering curriculum, passing 
of 147 credit hours, a grade point average of 2.00 or better, demonstration of 



School Of Engineering 



119 



proficiency in written English, tested in the junior year. Students receiving D 
grades in both ENG 111 and ENG 112 will be required to repeat ENG 111. 

Attendance at two professional society meetings of state-wide or 
larger scope, once in the spring of the junior year and once in the fall of 
the senior year is required. Attendance at three subsection meetings is 
considered the equivalent of one state-wide meeting, in meeting this 
requirement. 

Also a minimum of six continuous weeks of gainful employment is re- 
quired. This employment may be as laborer, sub-professional, or professional 
assistant in any of the following fields: industrial manufacture, repair serv- 
ice, or sales; industrial engineering or scientific research; engineering or 
architectural design and drafting; engineering exploration, surveying, or 
reconnaissance; construction of engineering works. Technical work while in 
military service does not satisfy this requirement. 

The student is responsible for obtaining his employment and supplying 
satisfactory evidence thereof to the department. This evidence will consist 
of a letter from the employer to the head of the department setting forth 
inclusive dates of employment; character of work performed- type of 
operation of firm or individual; an evaluation of the student's work. 

Student Activities— Close coordination with the work of the professional 
electrical engineering societies is maintained through the AIEE-IRE Joint 
Student Branch which meets twice a month. Faculty advisers assist the 
students in bringing to these meetings practicing engineers. The Joint 
btudent Branch also sponsors departmental activities such as picnics for 
new students and departmental participation in the Engineers' Fair. 

An active chapter of Eta Kappa Nu, the national honorary electrical 
engineering fraternity, undertakes numerous important projects in addition 
to holding two initiation banquets yearly. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EE 201, Elementary Circuits and 

Fields 4 

EC 205, The Economic Process 



**ENG 206, Reading for Discovery 
MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
•MS 201, Military Science II 



•AS 221, Air Science II 
•PE 201, Physical Education 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

EE 202, Elementary Circuits and 

Fields 4 

EC 205, The Economic Process 



♦•ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MA 202, Analytical Geometry 

and Calculus III 
PY 202, General Physics 
•MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
•AS 222, Air Science II 
•PE 202, Physical Education 



3 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EE 301, Intermediate Circuits and 

Fields 
EE 305, Electrical Machinery 
EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 
PY 407, Introduction to Modern 

Physics 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 

Elective 



Credits 

4 
4 

8 



20 



Spring Semester Credits 
EE 302, Intermediate Circuits and 

Fields 3 

EE 414, Electronics 4 

EM 312, Mechanics II (Dynamics) 3 

MA 301, Differential Equations 8 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Elective 3 

19 



120 School Of Engineering 

senior year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE 411, Electrical Engineering EE 602, Advanced Circuits and 

Senior Seminar 1 Fields 3 

EE 501, Advanced Circuits and EM 321, Strength of Materials I 3 

Fields 3 ME 303, Engineering Thermo- 

ME 301, Engineering Thermo- Dynamics III 3 

dynamics I 3 **SS 492, Contemporary Civilization 

**SS 491, Contemporary Civilization or 

or Elective in Humanities 3 

Elective Humanities 3 Departmental Electives 3 

Departmental Electives 3 Electives 3 

Electives 3 ~~ 

One of the following: 18 

MA 405, Introduction to Determi- 
nants and Matrices 

MA 411, Introduction to Applied 
Mathematics 

MA 501, Numerical Analysis I 

MA 611, Advanced Calculus I 

MA 632, Differential Equations II 

MA 641, Vector Analysis 

ST 361, Introduction to Statistics 

For Engineers I 3 

19 



* Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physical Education will schedule 
equivalent credits in courses outside their department. 
** See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Professional Degree — A fifth, or professional, year of study is offered in 
electrical engineering as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate 
program. This fifth year of study offers specialized and advanced course 
work leading to the degree of Electrical Engineer. Each student taking 
this fifth year work has his program of courses planned to meet his in- 
dividual needs. Regulations governing the Professional Degree are shown 
on pages 138, 139 and 140. 

Graduate Study — The graduate degrees offered by the Department of 
Electrical Engineering are the Master of Science and the Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

Graduate work in electrical engineering at the first-year of master's 
level divides naturally into fields such as electronics, automatic control, 
computers, and power systems. In the more advanced study required for the 
doctorate, however, this distinction tends to disappear. 

Advanced courses of a general and fundamental nature, such as electric 
network synthesis and advanced electromagnetic theory, are recommended 
for all graduate students in electrical engineering, especially those who 
plan to carry their advanced studies to the level of the doctorate. Minor 
sequences of study in advanced mathematics or physics are planned to fit 
the needs of individual students. 

Holders of graduate degree in electrical engineering at North Carolina 
State College are in continual demand. Alumni hold important positions in 
industrial, government, and university research laboratories, in the teach- 
ing profession, and in the administrative and engineering departments of 
manufacturing corporations and public utilities. 

For further information concerning graduate study in electrical engi- 
neering, the current Graduate School Catalog of North Carolina State 
College should be consulted. 



School Of Engineering 121 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS 



Professor P. H. McDonald, Head of Department 

Professor Adolphus Mitchell 

Associate Professor R. A. Douglas 

Visiting Associate Professor Shou-ling Wang 

Assistant Professors Maurice H. Clayton, J. P. Lamb, George W. Middleton 

Instructors Halbert F. Brinson, Joe W. Reece 

Undergraduate Study — The Department of Engineeinng Mechanics teaches 
and administers the courses in theoretical and applied mechanics, strength 
of materials, and fluid mechanics. These courses are fundamental to the 
professional and design courses of the several engineering curricula. The 
student is expected to acquire a basic knowledge of the physical properties 
of materials and the laws that govern their use in engineering design. 

Graduate Study — A student who is interested in investigation and re- 
search and has the proper prerequisite, may take a course of study offered 
by this department which leads to the degree of Master of Science in en- 
gineering mechanics. For general regulations of the Graduate School, the 
Graduate School Catalog should be consulted. 



ENGINEERING RESEARCH 



N. W. Conner, Director 

Research Professors R. F. Stoops, H. H. Stadelmaier 
Research Associate Professor F. M. Richardson 
Research Engineer Hayne Palmour III 

Research Associates K. R. Brose, S. W. Derbyshire, A. E. Lucier 
Research Assistants A. C. Fraker, J. V. Hamme, P. K. Maitra, R. B. MofFitt, 
J. Singletary, Jr., Thurman Upchurch 



INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM 



Research Professor and Head W. C. Bell 

Research Engineers A. A. Carlyle, J. R. Ogburn, W. G. Yamamoto 

Research Associates S. D. Coward, L. B. McGee 

Chemical Engineer J. A. Macon 

Industrial Specialist F. L. Eargle 

Industrial Waste Specialist D. N. Cote 



MINERALS RESEARCH LABORATORY 

Chief Engineer W. T. McDaniel 

Ore Dressing Engineers I. Redeker, T. J. Wright 

Chemical Engineer P. N. Sales 

Objectives— Research and teaching are the two responsibilities of the 
true university. The School of Engineering has a clear appreciation of 
the obligation of education to further man's understanding of the world 



122 School Of Engineering 

in which he lives and of the contribution of research to effective teaching. 
Within the school, research programs are conducted in many fields of en- 
gineering; these activities are given strong encouragement and support 
through the Department of Engineering Research. 

As a unit of North Carolina's Land-Grant College, the School of Engi- 
neering is obligated to serve the industrial life of the state. Functioning 
in this capacity, it offers a broad program of service and experimental aid 
through the Department of Engineering Research. Many industries in the 
state have brought problems to the school; association with the industrial- 
ists of the state is being sought and strengthened constantly. This service 
is further strengthened through close cooperation with the North Carolina 
Department of Conservation and Development. Particular encouragement 
and assistance are granted those investigations that give promise of new 
industry to North Carolina. 

Facilities — The Department of Engineering Research, established origin- 
ally in 1923 as the Engineering Experiment Station, maintains laboratories 
and a fulltime staff devoted exclusively to experimental work. Its operations 
are carried out in close cooperation with the administration and faculties 
of the teaching departments. The abilities of the various departments of 
engineering are combined through the department so that the complete 
research capacity of the School of Engineering is available for experimental 
work in any field. The department also acts as the administrator for the 
school in negotiations involving research programs done for private in- 
dustry and for governmental agencies. 

The Minerals Research Laboratory in Asheville is engaged in the expan- 
sion of North Carolina mineral production through facilities for the de- 
velopment of improved processes of mineral concentration, or examination 
and appraisal, and chemical analysis. 

The Industrial Experimental Program was created by the 1955 General 
Assembly acting upon a request from the School of Engineering. Its ob- 
jective is to provide technical assistance to the state's small industry and 
to promote utilization of its natural resources. 

Research Programs — Today the research capacity of the nation is being 
called upon as a resource for national security. Research facilities of col- 
leges and universities are prominent in this defense capacity, and the School 
of Engineering at North Carolina State College is now strong in its ability 
to serve among the leading engineering schools of the country. Several 
research programs sponsored by the services have been in progress for 
several years; the school's capacity for expanded service is large. 

Research currently in progress includes work being done for the Air 
Material Command of the U. S. Air Force, the Office of Ordnance Re- 
search, the Bureau of Ships, the Wright Air Development Center, Redstone 
Arsenal, and the Texas Company. Work is included in the fields of struct- 
ural clay products, radiant heating, stress analysis, rotational speed devia- 
tion measurements, tannin extraction, recovery from fish waste, erosion of 
plastics, fuel oils, precipitation hardening and diffiusion in alloys and 
electronics. 

Upon their conclusions, results of the engineering investigations are 
published as bulletins so that the information obtained may be made avail- 
able to the public and be contributed to the total field of technical knowl- 
edge. A complete list of the bulletins published to date or any other in- 
formation pertaining to the operation or availability of the facilities of the 
department will be furnished upon request. 



School Of Engineering 123 

Research Fellowships — To assure wider benefits for both graduate and 
undergraduate students from the engineering research activities, the de- 
partment offers several Research Fellowships and employs some of the 
more promising and deserving students as assistants in the laboratory on 
a part-time basis. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



Professor Clifton A. Anderson, Head of the Department 
Professor R. G. Carson, Jr., E. S. Johnson, R. W. Llewellyn 
Visiting Professor R. Willard 

Assistant Professors R. Alvarez, R. L. Cope, J. Stanislao 
Instructors C. E. Hunter, H. A. Knappenberger, G. E. Tucker 



Objectvies — Industrial engineering is a relatively new branch of the en- 
gineering profession. It has seen its greatest growth commencing with the 
industrial expansion required in the war years. As a college curriculum, it 
is the result of a demand by industry for graduates who are trained in the 
fundamentals of engineering and who have acquired a knowledge of the 
principles involved in planning, operating and controlling the operation of 
an industrial enterprise. 

Curriculum — It is the industrial engineer's job to transform plans, spec- 
ifications and blueprints into plant, equipment and personnel to create the 
product. He is concerned also with controls and plans for the profitable 
and continued operation of an exisiting plant. 

The industrial engineering program at North Carolina State College has 
been planned with this viewpoint in mind. After the first year, which is com- 
mon with all other branches of engineering, the curriculum includes subject 
matter in industrial organization and management, motion and time study, 
plant layout, quality control, job evaluation, accounting personnel and 
labor relations and production control together with other specialized cour- 
ses which help develop a background and technique for understanding our 
modern industrial system. 

The industrial engineering curriculum has been inspected and accredited 
by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development. 

Student Activities — Student organizations within the department include 
a chapter of the America Institute of Industrial Engineers. This student 
function has demonstrated its calibre by ranking high in the Annual Student 
Award every year in competition with the AIIE chapters at all other in- 
stitutions. Departmental and student activities of a professional and a 
social character are sponsored by the organization. 

An active chapter of Alpha Pi Mu, the industrial engineering honor 
society, gives recognition to the outstanding students in the junior and 
senior classes. The membership annually undertakes projects of value to 
industrial engineering students and the department. 



124 School Of Engineering 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



Fall Semester 

***HI 205, The Modern Western 
World 
or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
IE 201, Industrial Engineering I 
IE 217, Machine Tools 
IE 218, Metal Forming 
MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 



19 



Spring Semester Credit* 

***ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 

or 
HI 205, Modern Western World 3 

IE 202, Industrial Engineernig n 3 
MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 202, General Physics 5 

PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 3 
MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 

20 



JUNIOR YEAR* 



Fall Semester 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 
EM 341, Mechanics A (Statics) 
IE 303, Industrial Engineering III 
MA 301, Differential Equations I 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
ST 361, Statistics for Engineers 
Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
4 
3 
8 
3 
3 

21 



Spring Semester 

EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 
IE 303, Industrial Engineering IV 
** MA 405, Introduction to Determi 

nants and Matrices 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
**ST 362, Statistics for Engineers 
Elective 



Credits 
2 
4 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EE 331, Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 
EM 343, Strength of Materials A 
**IE 401, Industrial Engineering 

Analysis 
IE 451, Seminar 
ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics 
***SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Humanities Elective 
Elective 



Credits 



19 



Spring Semester 

EE 332, Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 
**IE 402, Industrial Engineering 

Analysis 
***SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Humanities Elective 

Technical Elective 

Elective 



Credits 



16 



* Proficiency in written expression to be demonstrated at the beginning of the junior 
year. Students who fail this test are required to take additional work in the English 
Department as recommended by the Industrial Engineering Department head. 

** At the end of the sophomore year, students in the Industrial Engineering curriculum 
will be permitted to choose between two sequences of four courses each in their junior 
and senior years. The sequences are (1) Math 405, ST 362, IE 401, and IE 402; and 
(2) MIM 201, IE 350, D3 404, IE 515. The first sequence is designed to emphasize 
mathematical techniques in management decision making. The second series emphasizes 
work relating to production and manufacturing engineering. More active participation in 
the technical aspects of planning, tooling, and improving manufacturing operations will 
be expected from graduates who take the latter sequence. At least one of the above 
sequences must be completed to fulfill graduation requirements. 
*** See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



School Of Engineering 



125 



Professional Study — A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in 
industrial engineering by means of specialized and advanced course work. 
Students may elect a specialty area in consultation with his adviser and 
then develop a program of study which suits his interests. A student may 
specialize in production engineering, in decision-making processes as re- 
lated to industrial engineering, or in administrative engineering. Typical 
programs in each of these areas are presented below. This fifth year of 
study leads to the Professional degree in industrial engineering. Regulations 
concerning the Professional Program are shown on pages 138, 139 and 140. 

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 

IE 515, Process Engineering 
IE 517, Automatic Processes 
ST 515, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 

Elective 
IE 581, Project Work 



Credits 


Spring 


Semester C 


■ rec 


8 


IE 404, 


Introduction to Tool 




8 




Engineering 


3 




IE 543, 


Standard Data 


3 


4 


IE 546, 


Advanced Quality Control 


3 


8 


IE 581, 


Project Work 


3 


2 


ST 516, 


Experimental Statistics for 




— 




Engineers 


3 



15 



15 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 

IE 521, Control Systems and 

Data Processing 
IE 651, Special Studies in 

Industrial Engineering 
ST 515, Experimental Statistics 
for Engineres 
Electives 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

IE 546, Advanced Quality Control 
IE 621, Inventory Control Methods 
IE 651, Special Studies in 

Industrial Engineering 
ST 516, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 

Elective 



Credits 



15 



15 



ADMINISTRATIVE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester Credits 

EC 504, Principles of Cost 

Accounting 8 

EC 525, Management Policy and 

Decision Making 8 

EC 531, Management of Industrial 

Relations 3 

ST 515, Experimental Statistics for 

Engineers 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 505, Principles of Cost 

Accounting 3 

IE 531, Quantitative Job Evaluation 

Methods 3 

IE 546, Advanced Quality Control 8 
IE 551, Standard Costs for 

Manufacturing 3 

ST 516, Experimental Statistics for 

Engineers 3 

15 



Graduate Study — For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog 
should be consulted. Graduate work is offered in industrial engineering 
leading to the degree of Master of Science in industrial engineering. 



FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT 



Professor E. Sigurd Johnson, In Charge 



Objectives — Any curriculum in the School of Engineering has as an aim 
the preparation of men capable of handling the technical problems arising 
in the jobs which they undertake. Where industry is already equipped 



126 



School Of Engineering 



with qualified engineers, the new employee with a basic engineering ed- 
ucation can be given on-the-job training in analyzing and solving the 
special problems peculiar to the particular plant or industry. 

In the case of the furniture industry, practically no experienced engi- 
neers exist. To be of service, the college must emphasize to a greater extent 
the application of engineering principles to the problems of the furniture 
industry. This can be done effectively only if the instructional staff is aware 
of the problems of the industry from direct contact and not merely from 
the academic discussion and the available literature. Consequently, the pro- 
gram has been worked out in conjunction with representatives of the man- 
ufacturers. Their viewpoint is based on a survey made among the entire 
membership of the Southern Furniture Manufacturers' Association. Re- 
sults of the survey indicate an overwhelming interest in college training 
to prepare men for work in this industry. 

Curriculum — It is the purpose of the curriculum offering the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in furniture manufacturing to prepare graduates for 
technical and, eventually, executive positions in the furniture industry. The 
curriculum will emphasize the application of engineering to furniture man- 
ufacturing. Related subjects covering management, labor relations, ac- 
counting, marketing, and sales will stress the technical as well as the human 
side of modern production methods and techniques. 

Student Activities — The Industrial Engineering Department sponsors the 
Furniture Club, which is operated by the students. All students in the cur- 
riculum are eligible for membership in the organization. The club brings 
in speakers from industry and holds social gatherings for the students. 



FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 



For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 211, Business Communications 8 
FOR 202, Wood Structure and 

Properties I 3 

•*HI 205, The Modern Western 

World 



ENG 206, Reading for Discovery 
PSY 200, Introduction to Psychology 
PY 211, General Physics 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 



3 



Spring Semester Credits 

**ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 



HI 205, The Modern Western World 
ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 
FOR 203, Wood Structure and 

Properties II 
IE 224, Wood Working Equipment 
PY 212, General Physics 
MS 202, Military Science 



AS 222, 
PE 202, 



Air Science 
Physical Education 



18 



18 



Summer Practieum: FOR 205-s, 206-s, 207-s, 208-s, 209-s 

JUNIOR YEAR* 



Fail Semester Credits 

FOR 301, Wood Processes I 4 

IE 201, Industrial Engineering I 3 
D3 322, Furniture Design and 

Construction 2 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 8 

Technical Elective 3 

Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 312, Accounting for Engineers 3 

IE 202, Industrial Engineering II 3 
IE 326, Furniture Manufacturing 

and Processing 4 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 

TX 271, Upholstery Fabrics 2 

Elective 3 



18 



18 



School Of Engineering 127 
senior year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IE 303, Industrial Engineering III 4 EC 432, Industrial Relations 3 

IE 341, Furniture Plant Layout IE 304, Industrial Engineering IV 4 

and Design 3 IE 462, Seminar 1 

IE 451, Seminar 1 **SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 

ST 361, Introduction to Statistics or 

for Engineers 3 Humanities Elective 3 

•*SS 491, Contemporary Issues I Technical Elective 3 

or Elective 3 

Humanities Elective 3 — 

Elective 8 17 

17 



* Proficiency in written expression to be demonstrated at the beginning of the junior 
year. Students who fail this test are required to take additional work in the English 
Department as recommended by the Industrial Engineering Department Head. 
** See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Professor G. L. Goglia, Acting Head of the Department 

Professors J. S. Doolittle, K. P. Hanson, R. B. Knight, R. M. Pinkerton, 

J. Woodburn 
Associate Professors W. E. Adams, T. C. Brown, R. D. Cess, B. H. Garcia, 

Jr., E. L. Harrisberger, P. B. Leonard, J. K. Whitfield 
Assistant Professors A. W. Futrell, Jr., T. B. Ledbetter, R. S. Lee, W. T. 

Snyder, J. T. Yen 
Instructors 0. A. Arnas, N. M. Beatty, D. L. Bernreuter, K. R. Crump, A. H. 

Eraslan, N. E. Greene, P. M. Hamilton, Jr., G. A. Myers, Jr., H. Oguro, 

G. H. Phillips, C. S. Rudisill, W. R. Stallings, E. H. Stinson, H. C. 
Topakoglu, B. D. Webb 



Objectives — Engineers are motivated by a desire to satisfy human needs 
through the application of scientific principles in such a manner as to place 
the fruits of their work within the economic reach of vast segments of 
humanity. To identify and evaluate human needs, modem engineers must 
have a sound education in the basic sciences, mathematics, and the human- 
ities. The gap between the discoveries of basic science and their application 
in the satisfaction of human needs is provided by an area of science known 
as the engineering sciences. It is with education in the engineering sciences 
and the development of talent in applying the principles of the engineering 
sciences that departments of engineering are principally concerned. 

Mechanical engineering covers a broad spectrum of engineering respon- 
sibility in such areas as nuclear and conventional power generation, mis- 
siles, rockets, jet engines, propulsion systems for land, sea, and air ve- 
hicles, refrigeration, air conditioning, combustion of fuels, instrumentation 
of industrial processes, solar energy, and the design of a wide variety of 
technical systems. Aeronautical engineering shares responsibility with me- 
chanical engineering for many of the areas described above but is princi- 
pally concerned with the structural design and analysis of air and space 
vehicles and with the phenomena of air and space flight. 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aeronautical 
engineering, both curricula are administered by the Department of Me- 
chanical Engineering at North Carolina State College. There is close co- 
operation between the faculties of the two disciplines in which responsibility 
for such engineering sciences as thermodynamics, heat transfer, mass trans- 



128 School Of Engineering 

fer, gas dynamics, aeroelasticity, vibrations, lubrication, fluid mechanics, 
magnetohydrodynamics, areodynamics, and instrumentation theory are 
shared. 

In cooperation with other departments in the School of Engineering the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering is prepared to offer work leading 
to a degree in nuclear engineering. Particular emphasis in the work of this 
department is placed on nuclear power, reactor heat transfer and the 
dynamics of reactor fluids. 

Curriculum — The curriculum in mechanical engineering is based on a 
firm foundation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, humanities and social 
sciences. The student's knowledge in the basic engineering sciences germane 
to mechanical engineering is carefully developed in the courses offered 
in this department and other departments of the School of Engineering. 
Finally, the curriculum provides an active experience in which the student's 
creative talents and imagination are challenged in several areas of appli- 
cation. This experience is gained through a choice of courses in the senior 
year and required courses in experimental mechanical engineering. 

The curriculum in aeronautical engineering is administered as an option 
in mechanical engineering. Generally speaking, the curricula in mechanical 
and aeronautical engineering differ slightly in the first three years. The 
point of departure occurs in the fourth year where the emphasis in the 
aeronautical engineering curriculum is placed on air and space structures 
and the aerodynamics of air and space vehicles 

The four-year undergraduate curricula in both mechanical and aeronauti- 
cal engineering prepares graduates who are equipped to profit from their 
experiences in the practice of engineering and to become early contributors 
in the solution of engineering problems of scientific and economic com- 
plexity. Both curricula offer a firm basis for further advanced study in 
graduate schools. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

♦ENG 205, Reading for Discovery EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 3 

or *EC 205, The Economic Process 

EC 205, The Economic Process 3 or 

IE 217, Machine Tools 1 ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and TE 218, Metal Forming 1 

Calculus II 4 MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

PY 201, General Physics I 6 Calculus HI 4 

MS 201, Military Science II PY 202, General Physics II 5 

or MS 202, Military Science II 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 or 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 AS 222, Air Science II 1 

Elective 8 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

18 18 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 
EM 312, Mechanics II (Dynamics) 3 EM 321, Strength of Materials I 3 
MA 301, Differential Equations I 3 EM 430, Fluid Mechanics 2 
ME 301, Engineering Thermo- ME 302, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 8 dynamics II 3 
ME 305, Mechanical Engineering ME 306, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory I 1 Laboratory II 1 

ME 311, Kinematics 3 ME 312, Dynamic Analysis 8 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 3 SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 3 

Elective 8 Elective 8 

19 18 



School Of Engineering 



129 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EE 331, Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 
ME 401, Power Plants 
ME 405, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory III 
ME 411, Machine Design II 
ME 441, Technical Seminar 
MIM 421, Metallurgy I 
*SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 

Elective in Humanities 

Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EE 332, Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 
ME 406, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory IV 
ME 412, Machine Design II 
ME 502, Heat Transfer 
MIM 422, Metallurgy II 
MIM 423, Metallurgy Laboratory 
*SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 



Elective 
Elective 



in Humanities 



Credits 



20 



* See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



AERONAUTICAL OPTION CURRICULUM 



For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



20 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

*ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 



EC 205, The Economic Process 

IE 217, Machine Tools 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics I 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
PE 201, Physical Education 

Elective 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 3 

♦EC 205, The Economic Process 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

IE 218, Metal Forming 1 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 202, General Physics II 5 

MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EM 312, Mechanics II (Dynamics) 
MA 301, Differential Equations 
ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 
ME 305, Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory I 
ME 311, Kinematics 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 



Spring 
EM 321, 
ME 302, 

ME 306, 

ME 351, 

ME 352, 
SS 302, 



Semester 

Strength of Materials I 
Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics II 

Mechanical Engineering 
Laboratory II 
Elements of Aeronautical 
Engineering 
Aerodynamics 
Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



19 



Credits 
8 



19 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EE 320, Elements of Electrical 

Engineering 
ME 441, Technical Seminar 
ME 459, Aircraft Structures 
ME 455, Aeronautical Laboratory 
ME 461, Airplane Design I 
MIM 421, Metallurgy I 
•SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Elective in Humanities 
Elective 



Credits 



20 



Spring Semester Credits 

ME 410, Jet Propulsion 8 

ME 456, Aeronautical Laboratory II 1 

ME 462, Airplane Design II 8 

ME 536, Aircraft Engines 3 

MIM 422, Metallurgy II 2 

MIS 423, Metallurgy Laboratory 1 
•SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 



Elective 
Elective 



in Humanities 



19 



• See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



130 



School Of Engineering 



Professional Study — A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in 
mechanical engineering for graduates who desire to return to the univer- 
sity for a program of concentrated study in a selected area. This program 
is intended primarily for practitioners and is, in no sense, a graduate pro- 
gram leading to the usual advanced degrees. The degree of mechanical 
engineer is conferred upon graduates of the fifth-year program. 



TYPICAL PROGRAM 



Fall Semester 

ME 601, Steam and Gas Turbines 

ME 545, Project Work in 

Mechanical Engineering I 
ME 601, Advanced Engineering 

Thermodynamics I 
ME 603, Advanced Power Plants 
ME 641, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar I 

Approved Elective 



HEAT-POWER 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ME 521, Aerothermodynamics 

ME 546, Project Work in 

Mechanical Engineering 
ME 604, Nuclear Power Plants 
ME 642, Mechanical Engineering 
Seminar II 
Approved Electives 



Credits 



II 2 



15 



15 



DESIGN 



Fail Semester Credits 

MA 411, Introduction to Applied 

Mathematics 3 

ME 515, Experimental Stress 

Analysis 3 

MIM 521, Advanced Physical 

Metallurgy I 3 

ME 545, Project Work in 

Mechanical Engineering I 2 
ME 611, Advanced Machine Design I 8 
ME 641, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar I 1 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

EM 554, Vibration Problems 3 

ME 517, Lubrication 8 

MIM 522, Advanced Physical 

Metallurgy II 3 

ME 646, Project Work in 

Mechanical Engineering II 2 
ME 612, Advanced Machine 

Design III 3 

ME 642, Mechanical Engineering 

Seminar II 1 



15 



Fall Semester 

ME 453, Applied Aerodynamics 

ME 602, Heat Transfer 

ME 652, Aircraft Applied Loads 

ME 645, Project Work in 

Mechanical Engineering I 

ME 641, Mechanical Engineering 
Seminar I 
Approved Elective 



'redits 


Spring 


Semester 


Credits 


3 


ME 502, 


Heat Transfer 


3 


3 


ME 554, 


Advanced Aerodynamio 




3 




Theory 


3 




ME 546, 


Project Work in Me- 




2 




chanical Engineering n 


2 




ME 562, 


Advanced Aircraft 




1 




Structures 


3 


3 


ME 642, 


Mechanical Engineering 









Seminar II 


1 


15 




Approved Elective 


3 



15 



Graduate Study — The purpose of graduate study in mechanical engi- 
neering is to prepare students for a career in research, development, and 
teaching. Hence, in addition to advanced study, research is an essential part 
of the graduate program. At present the Department of Mechanical En- 
gineering offers the Master of Science degree in mechanical and aeronauti- 
cal engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in mechanical engi- 
neering. Since all graduate programs are administered by the Graduate 
School prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



School Of Engineering 131 

MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Professor W. W. Austin, Head of the Department 

Professors W. C. Bell, W. W. Kriegel, J. M. Parker, III, H. H. Stadelmaier, 

R. F. Stoops 
Associate Professors W. C. Hackler, E. L. Miller, Jr. 
Assistant Professor H. S. Brown 
Instructors G. O. Harrell, L. E. Poteat 



Objectives — The primary objectives of the Department of Mineral In- 
dustries are the training and professional development of qualified techni- 
cal and administrative leaders for those industries concerned with the 
location and utilization of mineral resources. Included within this scope 
of operation are the fields of geological, ceramic, and metallurgical engi- 
neering. 

Curricula — Complete four-year undergraduate curricula in geological, 
ceramic, and metallurgical engineering are available in the department. 
Fifth year professional programs also are available for advanced work and 
specialization in each of these fields, and graduate programs leading to the 
Master's and Doctor's degree in ceramic engineering, and to the Master's 
degree in geological engineering and metallurgical engineering are offered. 

Facilities — The facilities of the Department of Mineral Industries are 
housed in Page Hall and the Ceramic Building. Located in Page Hall are 
departmental offices, drawing rooms, classrooms and extensive laboratory 
facilities for instructional work and research in the three areas of study 
covered by the department. Typical of the numerous well equipped lab- 
oratories in the building are those established for instruction in the fol- 
lowing areas of study; ceramic operations and processes, dielectric measure- 
ments, ceramic microscopy, physical geology, mineralogy, mineral dressing, 
petrology, physical metallurgy, and metallography. Other laboratory facil- 
ities, particularly kilns and furnaces, are housed in the Ceramic Building 
next door. Important additional facilities for instruction and research are 
located in the Engineering Research Department's Ceramic and Metal- 
lurgical Research Laboratories. Here equipment and instrumentation are 
available for advanced work in high temperature technology, X-Ray dif- 
fraction, radiography, electron microscopy, and photomicrography. 

Departmental Student Activities — The student branches of the American 
Ceramic Society, American Society for Metals, and the American Institute 
of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (Rockhound Society) 
through their monthly meetings provide an effective medium for the pro- 
fessional growth of the student engineers. Programs include presentation 
of student papers, guest speakers and social contact between student and 
staff. Participation acquaints the student with parliamentary and organi- 
zational procedures which are of great importance to professional, indus- 
trial and civic life. Students are encouraged to attend southeastern section 
and national meetings of their respective societies. Keramos, the oldest 
professional engineering fraternity, has an active chapter on the campus. 
This farternity is dedicated to the promotion of scholarship, mental achieve- 
ment and general service to ceramic engineering students. It carries on 
various projects, one of which is the "Big Brother Project" to help freshmen 
in their orientation in college life. 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING— The undergraduate curriculum in ceramic 
engineering is the result of years of study and development and is designed 
to meet the challenge of modern civilization. The program of study encom- 
passes a thorough grounding in the basic physical sciences and the funda- 
mental disciplines of engineering. Processes and operations peculiar to 



132 School Of Engineering 

ceramic engineering are developed from the viewpoint of interpreting and 
applying the underlying scientific laws, rather than empirical methods of 
procedure. The phenomena studied include crushing, grinding, classification 
and packing of particles, rheological properties of plastic masses, suspen- 
sions and slurries, drying of solids, combustion, heat transfer, and high 
temperature chemical reactions. Production at lowest possible cost and 
improvement of processes and operations are emphasized throughout the 
program. Attitudes of research, experimentation and originality of thought 
are fostered. 

Because the department is dedicated to training young men for leadership, 
and because of the recognition that responsible leadership should be vested 
in thinking, well-oriented men, the curriculum includes a planned program 
of social and humanistic studies. This program is designed to prepare the 
student for an understanding and appreciation of his responsibilities to 
society, his profession, and himself, to the end that he will lead a fuller, 
more productive and satisfying life. 

Opportunities — Professional training in ceramic engineering provides op- 
portunities for employment in an industry producing a wide variety of 
essential products including glass in all its forms, enamels and protective 
coatings for metals, structural clay products such as brick and tile, re- 
fractories for furnace linings, thermal insulators, electrical insulators, 
dielectric components, Portland cement, gypsum products, abrasives, din- 
nerware, art pottery, bath fixtures, and hundreds of other items. In addition 
to these "end products" ceramics are finding ever increasing applications in 
the electronic, aviation, guided missile, automotive and atomic energy fields. 
A continuing shortage of qualified personnel in ceramic engineering has 
resulted in far more employment offers than there are graduates. Initial 
employment upon graduation may be in the fields of research and devel- 
opment, in plant operation and control, and in technical sales and service. 
Such employment may lead to positions as directors of research, consulting 
and design engineers, sales directors, plant superintendents, production man- 
agers, and finally administrative officers. 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING— Geological engineering is a technical 
field in which geological facts are combined with engineering techniques for 
the solution of problems concerned mainly with mineral raw material supply 
and with engineering projects. Many minor engineering undertakings, 
such as construction of large dams and reservoirs, tunnels, and large build- 
ings, depend for success in part on an exact knowledge of their geological 
setting. On the other hand, such geological problems as the economical 
development of mineral resources require the use of the precise methods 
of engineering. In the field of geological engineering, then, geology con- 
tributes data concerning the constitution, structure and history of the 
earth; engineering supplies quantitative, analytical methods whereby physi- 
cal and chemical laws may be controlled for mankind's benefit. The geolo- 
gical engineering curriculum combines those fundamental disciplines re- 
garded as basic to all engineering with training in the aspects of geology 
that are of most practical application to human affairs. 

Opportunities — A graduate in this curriculum may follow one of two 
broad fields of engineering, either in the United States or in foreign coun- 
tries: one, the application of geology to engineering work: the other, the 
application of geology in the mineral industries. Geological engineers are 
currently employed and in demand by oil companies and quarrying con- 
cerns; exploration companies; construction firms; railroads, public utilities, 
banks and insurance companies; iron, steel and other metal producers; 
manufacturers using nonmetallic mineral raw materials, as for ceramics, 
cement, and abrasives, municipal, state and federal government agencies; 
schools, colleges, museums and research institutes. The Southeastern United 
States offers excellent opportunities for geological engineers. There is a 
growing need for the application of geological science to engineering con- 



School Of Engineering 133 

struction in connection with highways, foundations, excavations, and in 
water supply problems. The mineral industry of the Southeast has ex- 
panded substantially in the last decade; known deposits in the region, as 
yet only partially developed, include iron, nickel, copper, chromite, molyb- 
denite, feldspar, mica, kaolin, kyanite, sillimanite, pyrophyllite, talc, barite, 
spodumene, sulphur (pyrite), coal, phosphate, granite, limestone and marl. 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING— The undergraduate curriculum in 

metallurgical engineering is a standard four-year program designed to pro- 
duce technically trained leaders for those industries and agencies associated 
with the development, production, and fabrication of metals and alloys. 
The major emphasis is on the application of the principles of physical 
and mechanical metallurgy to engineering problems encountered in these 
industries. Major sequence courses for the development of this emphasis 
are offered during the third and fourth years of the curriculum and are 
preceded by a well rounded program of basic and engineering sciences, 
and humanities. Because of this arrangement it is possible for a student 
to complete the first two years of his training at a suitably qualified liberal 
arts college and to transfer to North Carolina State College for the final 
two years. While such an arrangement is encouraged it is nevertheless 
advisable for the prospective transfer student to seek the guidance and 
counsel of the Engineering School administration at the beginning of his 
college career, in order to minimize difficulties associated with the transfer 
of credits. The metallurgical engineering curriculum is unique in the 
School of Engineering in that it provides a minor sequence of 12 credits in 
a related field of engineering or science to be elected by the student with 
his advisor. 

Opportunities — Opportunities open to graduates in metallurgical engi- 
neering are virtually unlimited. Each year the demand for men with 
metallurgical training becomes more urgent, and the number of positions 
presently available is several times greater than the number of graduates. 
A graduate metallurgical engineer may thus choose from a wide selection 
of companies, locations and types of work. Among the more important job 
opportunities open to metallurgical engineers are those in research and 
development of new alloys so desperately needed as materials of con- 
struction in the rapidly expanding fields of chemical, mechanical, aero- 
nautical, and nuclear technology. With the rapid industrialization of the 
South and particularly the State of North Carolina, new opportunities 
are constantly developing for metallurgical engineers who will play a vital 
role in maintaining the forward progress of the state and region. 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

**HI 205, Modern Western World **HI 205. Modern Western World 

°r or 

ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 Calculus III 

PY 201, General Physics 5 PY 202, General Physics 



4 
•MIM 201, Structure and Properties CH 215', QuanYitative"'Analysi8 4 



of Engineering Materials 3 MS 202, Military Science II 

MS 201, Military Science II or 

ac „, »• o -° r tt AS 212, Air Science II i 

Pi IS: PhysSfTduiation 1 PE ^ ^^ EdUCati °" J 

n 18 



134 



School Of Engineering 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
CH 341, Physical Chemistry 
EM 341, Mechanics A (Staticsi 
MIC 301, Ceramic Operations I 
MIG 120, Physical Geology 
MIG 330, Mineralogy 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
4 
8 
3 
3 
8 

21 



Spring Semester 

CH 342, Physical Chemistry 

EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 

EM 343, Strength of Materials A 

MIC 302, Ceramic Operations n 

MIC 312, Ceramic Process 

Principles I 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credit* 
S 
2 
2 
3 

4 
3 
3 

20 



Summer Requirements: Six weeks' industrial employment. 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 


Credits 


Spring Semester < 


Crec 


MIC 413, Ceramic Process 




EE 320, Elements of Electrical 




Principles n 


4 


Engineering 


4 


MIC 415, Ceramic Engineering 




MIC 414, Senior Thesis 


3 


Design 


2 


MIC 416, Ceramic Engineering 




MIC 420, Industrial Ceramics 


3 


Design 


2 


MIC 425, Seminar 


1 


MIC 505, Research and Control 




MIG 531, Optical Mineralogy 


3 


Methods 


3 


**SS 491, Contemporary Issues 




**SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 




or 




or 




Humanities Elective 


3 


Humanities Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 




19 




18 



* Transfer students who have satisfactorily completed the equivalent of all first and 
second year courses except MIM 201, and who can present acceptable electives in lieu of 
this course will be admitted as third year students in ceramic engineering. They will be 
permitted to take this course in addition to the regular third year program, substituting 
it for three credits of elective permitted in the third year. 
** See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



Professional Year — A fifth, or professional year of study is offered in 
ceramic engineering as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate 
program. This professional year of study offers specialized advanced course 
work leading to the degree of Ceramic Engineer, and is especially designed 
for those planning careers in industrial production activities and technical 
service and sales. Each program of study is designed to suit the needs of 
the individual student. The curriculum shown below is typical of these 
programs. 



Regulations covering professional study are shown on pages 138, 139 and 140. 



TYPICAL PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

PROFESSIONAL STUDY 



Credits 



Fall Semester 

IE 408, Production Control 3 

MIC 507, Advanced Ceramic 

Experiments 3 

MIC 511, Advanced Studies in Firing 3 

Electives 6 



Spring Semester 

IE 332, Motion and Times Study 

MIC 508, Advanced Ceramic 

Experiments 
MIC 527, Refractories in Service 

Electives 



Credits 

4 



15 



15 



School Of Engineering 
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



135 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

••HI 206, Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
•MIG 120, Physical Geology 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 211, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Credit* 



17 



Spring Semester Credit* 

••HI 205, Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus IH 4 

PY 202, General Physics 5 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 4 

MS 202, Military Science 



AS 212, Air Science 

PE 202, Physical Education 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
CH 341, Physical Chemistry 
EM 341, Mechanics A (Statics) 
CE 201, Surveying I 
MIG 222, Historical Geology 
MIG 330, Mineraloy 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



20 



Spring Semester 

CH 342, Physical Chemistry 

EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 

EM 343, Strength of Materials 

MIG 372, Elements of Mining 

Engineering 
MIG 442, Petrology 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Summer Requirements: 

Engineering 



Credit* 
3 
2 
2 

4 
3 
3 
3 

20 
Six weeks' industrial employment or summer camp in Geological 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EE 320, Electrical Engineering 
MIG 351, Structural Geology 
MIG 411, Economic Geology 
MIG 481, Senior Seminar 
MIG 531, Optical Mineralogy 
••SS 491, Contemporary Issues 
or 

Humanities Elective 

Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
1 



20 



Spring Semester 
EM 430, Fluid Mechanics 
MIG 412, Economic Geology 
MIG 452, Sedimentation and 

Stratigraphy 
MIG 462, Geological Surveying 
MIG 482, Senior Seminar 
•*SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 
or 

Humanities Elective 

Elective 



Credits 
2 
3 

3 
3 
1 



U 



yIr a co™ "except W M°ir ha i'p e n SatiS i aC ^ rily com P le <ed the equivalent of all first and second 
year courses except MIG 120, and who can present acceptable electives in lieu of this 
C0 ^ 8? t^ ,1 l f if d Ti^ ted aS th - ird year 8tud ents ^ geological engineering They will be 
permitted to take this course in addition to the regular third year program substituting 
* £°/v three credlta of electives permitted in the third year. K ' "-——»—■ 

„* .1 't° T PJ" ofessionaI ' >ear of study is offered in Geological Engineering as a continuation 
of the fourth-year undergraduate program. This fifth year of study offers specialized »nH 
advanced work leading to the degree of Geological Engineer specialized and 



•• See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 

Professional Study— A fifth, or professional year of studv is offered 
in geological engineering as a continuation of the fourth-year undergrad- 
uate program. This fifth year of study offers specialized and advanced work 
leading to the degree of Geological Engineers. 

Regulations covering Professional Study are shown on pages 138, 139 and 140. 



136 



School Of Engineering 



TYPICAL PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

PROFESSIONAL STUDY 



Credits 



Fall Semester 

MIG 461, Engineering Geology 3 

MIG 571, Mining and Mineral 

Dressing 3 

MIG 581, Geomorphology 3 
MIG 611, Advanced Economic Geology 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

MIG 522, Petroleum Geology 3 

MIG 552, Geophysics 3 
MIG 572, Mining and Mineral 

Dressing 3 
MIG 612, Advanced Economic Geology 3 

Elective 3 



15 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

**HI 205, Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

PY 201, General Physics 5 

*MIM 201, Structure and Properties 
of Engineering 
Materials I 3 

MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 211, Air Science 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

**HI 205, Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 3 

MA 202, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 202, General Physics 5 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 4 

MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 212, Air Science 1 

PE 202, Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 341, Physical Chemistry 

EM 341, Mechanics A (Statics) 

IE 217, Machine Tools 

IE 218, Metal Forming 

MIM 331, Physical Metallurgy I 

SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 

Minor Sequence Courses 

Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 



19 



Spring Semester 

CH 342, Physical Chemistry 

EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 

EM 343, Strength of Materials 

MIM 332, Physical Metallurgy II 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 

Minor Sequence Courses 

Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 

19 



Summer Requirements: Six weeks' industrial employment. 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EM 430, Fluid Mechanics 

MIM 401, Metallurgical Operations 

MIM 431, Metallography 

MIM 451, Seminar 

**SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 
or 
Humanities Elective 
Minor Sequence Course 
Elective 



Credits 
2 
4 
3 
1 



19 



Spring Semester 

EE 320, Electrical Engineering 

MIM 402, Metallurgical Operations 

MIM 432, Metallography 

MIM 452, Seminar 

Minor Sequence Courses 
**SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 



Humanities 
Elective 



Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3 



21 



* Transfer students who have satisfactorily completed the equivalent of all first and second 
year courses except MIM 201, and who can present acceptable electives in lieu of this 
course will be admitted as third year students in metallurgical engineering. They will be 
permitted to take this course in addition to the regular third year program, substituting 
it for three credits of electives permitted in the third year. 
** See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 



School Op Engineering 



137 



PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 
Regulations covering Professional Study are shown on pages 138, 139 and 140. 

TYPICAL PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 



PROFESSIONAL STUDY 



Fall Semester Credits 

MIM 521, Advanced Physical 

Metallurgy 3 
MIM 523, Metallurgical Factors in 

Design 2 

MIM 445, Experimental Engineering 3 

PY 407, Modern Physics 8 

ME 502, Heat Transfer 3 
MIM 451, Metallurgical Engineering 

Seminar 1 



15 



Spring Semester 

MIM 522, Advanced Physical 

Metallurgy 
MIM 524, Metallurgical Factors 

in Design 
MIM 446, Experimental Engineering 
CHE 502, Electrochemical 

Engineering 
ME 615, Experimental Stress 

Analysis 
MIM 452, Metallurgical Engineering 

Seminar 



Credits 



3 



15 



NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 



Dr. H. A. Lamonds, Coordinator of the Program 

The nuclear engineering curriculum is offered in response to the re- 
quirements of industry and research organizations for engineers equipped 
with a basic knowledge of nuclear technology. The curriculum is planned 
to include a core of required courses and a number of technical elective 
courses in engineering or mathematics. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in nuclear engineering is awarded 
upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed four-year curriculum. For 
those desiring further training, graduate programs terminating in a Mas- 
ter's or a Doctor of Philosophy degree in nuclear engineering is offered. 

The nuclear engineering program is being reviewed during the 1960-61 
school year with the aim of incorporating changes to keep abreast of this 
rapidly growing area of technology. Information on the new program may 
be obtained in late spring of 1961 from the Director of Instruction, School 
of Engineering. 



NUCLEAR ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 
For the freshman year, refer to page 110. 



Fall Semester 

MA 201, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
••HI 205, Modern Western World 

or 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 

Technical Electives 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 



Spring 


Semester 


Credits 


EM 341 
MA 202 

PY 202, 
••ENG 


, Mechanics A (Statics) 
, Analytical Geometry and 

Calculus III 

General Physics 
205, Reading for Discovery 


2 

4 

6 


HI 205, 
MS 202, 


Modern Western World 
Military Science 


3 


AS 222, 
PE 202, 


or 

Air Science 
Physical Education 


1 
1 



17 



16 



138 



School Of Engineering 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
EM 342, Mechanics B (Dynamics) 
EM 343, Strength of Materials A 
MA 301, Differential Equations 
PY 401, Intermediate Physics I 

or 
PY 403, Intermediate Physics II 
PY 407, Introduction to Modern 

Physics 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 

Elective 



Credits 
2 
2 
3 



20 



Spring Semester 

MA 511, Advanced Calculus 

or 
MA 532, Advanced Differential 

Equations 
♦ME 301, Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 
PY 402, Intermediate Physics I 

or 
PY 404, Intermediate Physics, II 
PY 410, Nuclear Physics I 
SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 
Elective 



Credits 



4 
4 
3 
3 

20 





SENIOR 


YEAR 




Fall Semester 


Credits 


Spring Semester C 


rea 


EE 320, Elements of Electrical 




EM 430, Fluid Mechanics 


2 


Engineering 


4 


PY 520, Physical Technology in 




PY 419, Introduction to Nuclear 




Radioactivity 


8 


Engineering 


2 


PY 530, Elementary Nuclear Reactor 




PY 518, Radiation Hazard and 




Theory 


3 


Protection 


3 


**SS 492, Contemporary Issues II 




**SS 491, Contemporary Issues I 




or 




or 




Elective in Humanities 


3 


Elective in Humanities 


3 


Technical Electives 


6 


Technical Electives 


6 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 
20 




20 



* CHE 415 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, may be substituted. 
** See page 110 for information about the Humanities Sequence. 

Graduate Study — Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering — The Mas- 
ter of Science program in nuclear engineering provides study in reactor 
theory, nuclear physics, engineering, and mathematics. A research thesis 
is required for each degree. The time normally required to complete the 
degree is about three semesters, depending on the student's background. 

Equipment available on campus for use in Master's and Doctor's research 
problems includes a heterogeneous nuclear reactor, homogeneous reactor, 
a subcritical assembly, and a 1 mev Van De Graaff Accelerator. Laboratory 
training is provided also using these reactors. 

Doctor of Philosophy — In the spring of 1950 the Graduate School of the 
Consolidated University of North Carolina granted authority to enroll 
students for training to the doctorate level in nuclear engineering. Facili- 
ties and courses are available to accommodate a wide latitude of emphasis 
of programs within the framework of nuclear engineering. The usual 
rules and regulations of the Graduate School apply to students enrolled 
in the Doctorate Program. For general regulations, the Graduate School 
Catalog should be consulted. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING 



The School of Engineering offers fifth-year professional curricula leading 
to the degrees Ceramic Engineer, Civil Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Elec- 
trical Engineer, Geological Engineer, Industrial Engineer and Mechanical 
Engineer. These curricula are tailor-made to fit the particular needs of 
each student with a view that upon completion of a program the student 
will be prepared to pursue a professional career in engineering. 



School Of Engineering 139 

It is the intent of the fifth-year program to emphasize professional 
course work rather than research. To this end, a curriculum is comprised 
of 30 semester credits of course work requiring of the student a minimum 
of one academic year in residence; neither a thesis nor a reading knowl- 
edge of a foreign language is required. Samples of curricula that meet the 
requirements of the fifth-year program may be found under the appropriate 
departmental curricula. These curricula are to be considered illustrative; 
the actual program of study will be especially designed to fit the needs 
of the individual student. 

Admission — Applicants who hold the Bachelor's degree in engineering 
from recognized colleges will be admitted to the professional program of the 
School of Engineering upon presentation of official credentials. For uncon- 
ditional admission, these credentials must show the completion, with a 
minimum grade point average of 2.5 (C+), of an amount of undergraduate 
work in the proposed field of professional study corresponding to that 
normally required for a Bachelor's degree in that field. 

Admission on a provisional basis may be granted applicants who do not 
meet the formal requirements. In case of insufficient preparation, pre- 
requisite courses will be prescribed in addition to the normal fifth-year 
course requirements. 

Applications for admission, accompanied by full credentials in the form 
of transcripts of academic records, should be filed in the office of the 
Dean of Engineering at least 30 days in advance of the semester in which 
admission is sought. 

General Regulations — The following regulations of the School of Engi- 
neering will be observed: 

1. An undergraduate enrolled at North Carolina State College, who plans 
to undertake a professional program and who has fulfilled all requirements 
for the Bachelor's degree except one or two courses, may be permitted to 
enroll in certain courses and later obtain credit toward the professional 
degree provided the student gives notice of his purpose to the Dean of the 
School of Engineering. The maximum credit to be obtained in this way is 
six semester course credits. 

2. Credit for professional work to be applied toward the requirements 
for the professional degree, not to exceed six semester credits, may be 
transferred to North Carolina State College from recognized institutions 
of university grade offering advanced work in engineering and related 
fields. Such a transfer of credit must be recommended by the head of the 
department in which the student does his major work and it must be 
approved by the Dean of Engineering. 

3. Fifth-year students are classified as post-baccalaureate students and 
are subject to rules and regulations as established and administered by the 
Dean of Engineering. 

4. Grades for each completed course are reported to the Dean of En- 
gineering and to the Office of Registration. A minimum grade of C must 
be made in each course to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 
(C+) in all course work must be attained to satisfy requirements for a 
professional degree. 

5. Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the 
professional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward the 
professional degree, unless approved by the head of the department con- 
cerned and the Dean of Engineering. 

6. Each fifth-year student will be assigned to a committee consisting of 
his department head and the professor in charge of the work in which he 
is majoring. The function of this committee is to assist the student in 



140 School Op Engineering 

preparing a program of study and to counsel him in his academic work. 
The student will be required, with the assistance of his committee, to 
prepare a complete plan of study before mid-semester of his first semester 
in residence. This program of study is subject to the approval of the Dean 
of Engineering. 



School of Forestry 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



Richard J. Preston, Dean 

Professors R. C. Bryant, R. M. Carter, J. 0. Lammi, T. E. Maki, A. J. 

Stamm, B. J. Zobel 
Professors Emeriti J. V. Hofmann, C. E. Libby, L. Wyman 
Associate Professors C. A. Hart, R. G. Hitchings, W. D. Miller, T. 0. Perry 
Assistant Professors A. C. Barefoot, H. D. Cook, C. S. Hodges, C. G. Landes, 

R. J. Thomas 
Instructor J. T. Rice 



While forestry has been recognized and practiced for centuries in Europe, 
this profession is relatively new in the United States, dating from about 
the beginning of the 20th Century. During the period of rapid expansion 
and development of our country, the forests were badly neglected and 
abused. Now, however, with our timber supplies depleted and the value 
of timber products increasing, sound forest practices have been accepted 
as economically desirable and feasible. Increasing the productivity and 
quality of our forests is basic to the welfare of the Southeast. The impor- 
tance of the forest resource in the economy of North Carolina is brought 
out by the fact that 62 per cent of the land area is in forest, with wood 
products industries ranking next to textiles as a source of industrial 
employment. 

Through a program which offers a broad training in the physical and 
biological sciences, as well as a sound cultural background, the School of 
Forestry prepares students for service in the professional fields of forest 
management, pulp and paper technology, and wood technology. 

Curricula — The school offers undergraduate instruction leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in the professional fields of forest manage- 
ment, wood technology, and pulp and paper technology. All curricula 
have a common freshman year thus enabling the student to postpone 
selection of a major field until he has had an opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with its scope and possibilities. 

Forest management deals with all phases of the management of wild 
lands and includes such related subjects as water-shed protection, wildlife 
management and recreation. In order that the student may be adequately 
prepared for work of such diverse nature, the curriculum provides training 
in such subjects as silviculture, timber estimating, management, fire pre- 
vention and control, forest pathology, insect control, forest soils, economics, 
and other aspects of land use. 

The course of study in wood technology, which is concerned with the 
technical aspects of utilization, includes training in all types of wood 
using and wood manufacturing industries. It incorporates technical and 
practical principles of logging, milling, seasoning, gluing, preserving, 
finishing, fabricating, and machining, and includes the fundamentals of 
sound business administration. 

Pulp and paper technology trains men for work in pulp and paper plants. 
Students are given thorough training in chemistry, mathematics, physics, 
wood structure and properties, pulping processes and engineering subjects 
related to pulp and paper manufacturing. 

Degrees — The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon completion 
of any of the four-year curricula in the areas mentioned above. 



144 School Of Forestry 

Professional preparation beyond the four-year curricula is desirable, 
and qualified students are urged to plan a five-year program leading to the 
Master's degree. The degree of Master of Science is offered for those de- 
siring specialization in the fields of scientific research, and for students 
desiring a thorough professional background, the school offers the degree 
of Master of Forestry or Master of Wood Technology. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in several fields in forestry. 

Further information regarding graduate study is contained in the Grad- 
uate School Catalog which may be obtained from the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

Facilities and Laboratories — The School of Forestry is now housed in 
three new, modernly equipped buildings on the west side of the campus. 
Faculty offices, classrooms, and laboratories are now located in Kilgore 
Hall, the main forestry building. In addition, two buildings house special- 
ized programs which are unique in the South. 

Wood Products Laboratory — The Brandon P. Hodges Wood Products 
Laboratory is one of the largest and best equipped laboratories in existence 
for the conduct of research and training in wood technology. Staff offices, 
research facilities, wood structure, chemistry and physical properties lab- 
oratories are located in the Forestry building. In addition, the $360,000 
Brandon P. Hodges Laboratory building was dedicated in 1960 and houses 
the wood machining, finishing, gluing and preserving laboratories, as well 
as the sawmill, dry kilns, and veneer plant. The laboratory provides service 
to the wood using industries in the development of methods of quality con- 
trol, production control, operations analysis, and market analysis. Graduate 
students in wood technology participate in the laboratory's research pro- 
gram as a part of their advanced training. 

Robertson Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Technology — The curriculum 
in pulp and paper technology is approved as the regional program to serve 
the Southeast. The $450,000 Robertson Laboratory, dedicated in 1957, pro- 
vides unique and outstanding facilities for instruction and research. Located 
in the building are wood preparation, chemical, pulping, pulp and paper 
testing, and colorful laboratories, as well as digesters, and a small paper 
machine. Space and equipment are adequate to handle 40 seniors and 10 
graduate students. 

School Forests — The School of Forestry, with more than 82,000 acres of 
forest land and three permanent field camps, has facilities unexcelled in 
many respects for field instruction and research. 

The Hofmann Forest, owned and operated by the North Carolina Forestry 
Foundation for the benefit of the School of Forestry, consists of approxi- 
mately 78,000 acres located in Jones and Onslow counties in the south- 
eastern portion of the state. Pond and loblolly pine together with hard- 
wood and cypress swamps characterize this tract. 

The George Watts Hill Demonstration Forest is a tract of 1,500 acres 
located 16 miles north of Durham. This typically Piedmont forest of rolling 
terrain contains stands of loblolly, shortleaf, and Virginia pines along with 
numerous hardwoods. The permanent summer camp for sophomores is 
located in this area. This Piedmont area is supplemented by the 1,750 acre 
Hope Valley Forest near Chapel Hill. 

The Wayah Recreational Area on the North Carolina National Forest 
near Franklin is located in a typical mountain forest. Facilities at this 
area have been leased from the Government and portions of the spring 
semester of the senior year and of the sophomore summer camp are held in 
permanent quarters of this mountain tract. 



School Of Forestry 145 

The Carl Alwin Schenck Memorial Forest of 250 acres located four miles 
northwest of the campus is being developed into a model farm forest and 
is used for field instruction near the campus. 

The school nursery, located on the campus, is equipped for instructional 
purposes and the production of planting stock. 

Field Instruction and Experience — All students are required to present 
a minimum of one summer of acceptable work experience in order to meet 
the graduation requirements. Students are required to consult with their 
advisers as to what type of employment will be acceptable. 

The 10-week sophomore summer camp is a requirement for students in 
forest management. This camp is prerequisite for junior standing. Students 
in forestry management are also required to attend camp during the last half 
of the spring semester of the senior year. Permanent, well equipped camps 
are maintained on these coastal, Piedmont, and mountain forests. A "C" 
average is required for admission to these camps. 

Wood technology students are required to attend a 10-week practicum 
following the sophomore year. This practicum is prerequisite for junior 
standing. The first half of this period is devoted to laboratory exercises in 
machining, gluing, drying and finishing wood; preparation of particle board; 
operation safety and maintenance of equipment; and plant inspections. The 
second half covers experience in logging, milling, cruising, and graphic 
methods. 

Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative wood 
industries are required of all students as a part of their class assignments. 
To cover the costs of chemical supplies and off -campus training all students 
enrolled in the School of Forestry pay a field laboratory fee of $10.00 each 
year at the time they first register during a school year. A maintenance 
and supply fee of $20.00 is charged for both the summer camp and practi- 
cum. 

Opportunities — A wide and rapidly expanding field of employment pos- 
sibilities is available in the Southeast to young men trained in forestry. 
Until recent years most job opportunities were with government agencies in 
managing public forests, and this still constitutes a major source of em- 
ployment. These agencies include state and federal forest services, extension 
services, and other groups such as the Soil Conservation Service and the 
Tennessee Valley Authority. 

In recent years job opportunities with private industries have expanded 
greatly. Increasing numbers of technically trained young men are en- 
tering a wide variety of professional positions in the fields of forest land 
management, water-shed management, logging, sawmilling, veneer and 
plywood manufacturing, pulp and paper making, kiln drying, wood preser- 
vation and the manufacture of wood products such as furniture, dimension 
stock and various prefabricated items. 

The merchandising of lumber and lumber products offers numerous op- 
portunities for students qualified for sales, business administration or small 
building construction. Sawmills and lumber yards, plywood and paper 
manufacturers, and flooring, wallboard and other forest products plants 
need trained men. 

Exceptional students will find opportunities for employment in research 
or teaching. This type of work ordinarily requires a graduate degree. 
There has been an increasing demand for well-trained woodlands managers 
and wood technologists, as well as for research workers in government 
experiment stations and laboratories. 



146 



School Of Forestry 



More than 80 per cent of the graduates of the School of Forestry are 
now employed in some field of forest or wood products work. The few 
students who have not followed the forestry profession have found their 
college education sufficiently broad to provide a sound basis for a wide 
variety of work. 

Extension Programs — The Extension Forestry Department of the Agri- 
cultural Extension Service is a vital part of the school's forestry activities. 
This program serves the landowners and wood industries of the state. It 
is responsible for their understanding, acceptance, and application of new 
ideas and techniques developed through research and experience. The two 
major fields of program emphasis are forest management, where extension 
specialists train and work through the county agents; and wood products, 
where the specialists work more or less directly with wood industry owners 
and managers. 

In cooperation with the College Extension Division, short courses are 
offered in a number of fields to provide men in industry an opportunity to 
keep abreast of modem developments in techniques and equipment. 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Loan Funds — A number of undergraduate 
scholarships, research assistantships and training fellowships are available 
to qualified students. Students interested in applying should write to the 
Dean of the School of Forestry. 

The Hofmann Loan Fund was established by alumni of the School of 
Forestry to honor Dr. J. V. Hofmann, the first director of the Division. 
Loans to worthy students are available through the Student Loan Fund 
established by the State College Alumni Association. 

Many students help pay their expenses through part-time work at the 
college or in town. The College Counseling Center assists in locating em- 
ployment. 

Honors Program — Students making exceptional academic records during 
their freshman and sophomore years may, with the approval of the faculty, 
elect to follow an honors program. These students are required to enroll in 
the core courses in the several curricula but are otherwise free to utilize 
their electives to develop individual courses of study designed to meet their 
needs and satisfy their interests, subject only to the approval of the honors 
adviser. 



FRESHMAN YEAR IN ALL FORESTRY CURRICULA 



Fall Semester Credits 

BO 103, General Botany 4 

**CH 101, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 
or 
**CH 102, General Inorganic 

Chemistry 4 

ENG 111, Composition 3 

FOR 101, Introduction to Forestry 1 
***MA 111, Algebra, Trigonometry 4 
MS 101, Military Science 

or 
AS 121, Air Science 1 

PE 101, Physical Education and 

Hygiene 1 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

•BO 211, Dendrology 

or 
•ME 101, Engineering Graphics 2 

•*CH 103, General and Qualitative 
Chemistry 
or 
•*CH 104, General and Qualitative 
Chemistry 
or 
**CH 203, Chemistry 4 

ENG 112, Composition 3 

FOR 102, Introduction to Forestry 2 
***MA 112, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

MS 102, Military Science 

or 
AS 122, Air Science 1 

PE 102, Physical Education and 

Hygiene 1 



17 



* Forest Management and Wood Technology students take BO 211, Pulp and Paper 

students take ME 101. 

•* Forest Management students take CH 101 and 203, Wood Technology students take 

CH 101 and 103, Pulp and Paper students take CH 102 and 104. 

*** Students in Wood Technology and Pulp and Paper Technology who have studied solid 

geometry in high school should take MA 101 and 102. 



School Of Forestry 
FOREST MANAGEMENT 



147 



Professor T. E. Maki, Department Head 



Objectives — Forest management is the application of business methods 
and technical forestry principles to the operation of forest properties. This 
field requires a knowledge of individual trees and timber stands, of differ- 
ent forest types and entire forest areas, as well as of the basic biological 
relationships within the forests. It also requires a knowledge of land 
surveying, timber cruising, measurement of forest products, and of the 
economic factors involved in the business of growing wood crops. 

Curriculum — The curriculum in forest management is organized to 
provide a broad basic training and also to permit limited specialization. 
To accomplish the latter goal, the curriculum includes 24 elective credits. 
At the beginning of his junior year, the student selects one of the five 
areas of specialization listed and chooses courses listed under this field 
for his elective credits. 

The curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in forest 
management. A minimum of 151 credits is required for graduation. 

Opportunities — Students who complete the curriculum are trained for 
positions with pulp companies, lumber companies, and other private land- 
owners; federal and state forest services; agricultural extension; and for 
private enterprise as consultants, forest landowners or sawmill operators. 



CURRICULUM IN FOREST MANAGEMENT 



For freshman year see page 146. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 212, Dendrology 

FOR 202, Wood Structure and 

Properties 
PY 211, General Physics 

Social Science Elective 
ZO 103, General Zoology 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education and 

Hygiene 



Credit* 
2 



Spring Semester 

SOI 200, Soils 

CE 201, Surveying 

EC 201, General Economics 

English Elective 
Social Science Elective 
MS 202, Military Science 

or 
AS 222, Air Science 
PE 202, Physical Education and 

Hygiene 



18 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
S 



18 





SUMMER CAMP 


Credits 


FOR s204, 
FOR &214, 
FOR s224, 
FOR 8264, 

FOR s274, 


Silviculture 
Dendrology 
Forest Mapping 
Protection and 
Utilization 
Mensuration 


2 
2 
2 

2 
2 



10 



148 



School Of Forestry 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
BO 421, Plant Physiology 
ENT 301. Forest Insects 
FOR 361, Silvics 
ST 311, Statistics 
Electives 



Credits 
A 
8 
8 
8 
4 

17 



Spring Semester 

FOR 362, Silvics 

FOR 372, Mensuration 

PP 318, Forest Tree Diseases 

Social Science Elective 

Electives 



Credit* 
3 
8 
8 
8 
6 

18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 321, Scientific Writing 
FOR 601, Forest Valuation 
FOR 512, Forest Economics 
FOR 531, Forest Management 
Electives 



Credit* 
3 
3 
3 
8 
6 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 404, Management Plans (camp) 3 

FOR 405, Forest Inventory (camp) 2 

FOR 406, Forest Industries (camp) 2 

FOR 407, Field Silviculture (camp) 2 

FOR 511, Silviculture (8 weeks) 3 

FOR 532, Forest Management 3 
FOR 553, Forest Photogrammetry 

(8 weeks) 2 

17 



FOREST MANAGEMENT FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION 



A student should select one of the following fields of specialization and 
choose elective courses from those listed under that field. 



GENERAL FORESTRY 



Fall Semester Credits 

BO 441, Plant Ecology 3 

FOR 422, Forest Products 3 

FOR 423, Logging Milling 3 

FOR 462, Forest Grazing 2 
FOR 472, Policy and Administration 2 

ZO 312, Game Management 3 



Spring Semester 

FOR 462, Art Forestation 

MIG 120, Geology 

RS 301, Rural Sociology 



Credits 
2 
3 



FOREST WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 



Fall Semester Credits 
BO 441, Plant Ecology 8 

FOR 452, Forest Grazing 2 

ZO 301, Animal Psysiology 8 

ZO 521, Limnology 8 

ZO 551, Wildlife Management 8 



Spring Semester Credits 
ZO 252, Ornithology 3 

ZO 301, Animal Psysiology 8 

ZO 522, Animal Ecology 8 

ZO 544, Mammology 8 

ZO 552, Wildlife Management 8 



PARKS AND RECREATION 



Fall Semester 

BO 411, Plant Ecology 

MIG 120, Geology 

RS 301, Rural Sociology 

SOC 202, Sociology 



Credits Spring Semester Credits 

3 BO 403, Systematic Botany 3 

8 PSY 200, Psychology 3 

8 ZO 252, Ornithology 8 

8 ZO 544, Mammology 8 



FOREST NURSERY MANAGEMENT 



Fall Semester 

AGE 321, Irrigation, Drainage 

and Terracing 
BO 532, Advanced Plant 

Physiology 
ENT 671, For Entomology 
GN 411, Principles of Genetics 



Credits 



Spring Semester Credits 

SOI 341, Soil Fertility 3 

FC 414, Weed Control 3 

BO 633, Advanced Plant Physiology 2 
FOR 462, Art Forestation 2 

HRT 301, Plant Propagation 3 



School Of Forestry 149 

graduate or research 

Fall Semester Credit* Spring Semester Credit* 

BO 441, Plant Ecology 3 BO 403, Systematic Botany 3 

CH 103, General and Qualitative CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 4 

Chemistry 4 GN 411, Genetics 3 

MA 211, Analytic Geometry and MA 212, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus B 3 Calculus C 3 

ML Foreign Language 3 MA 215, Finite Math 3 

PY 212, Physics S ML Foreign Language S 

WOOD TECHNOLOGY 

Professor R. J. Preston, Acting Department Head 

Curriculum — The great wood industries which convert wood into thou- 
sands of commerical products offer many opportunities for wood technology 
majors. 

The curriculum has been designed to give sound coverage in mathematics 
and the sciences and to permit sufficient flexibility to enable students to 
specialize along lines of major interest. At the end of the sophomore year, 
wood technology students attend a 10-week practicum which is prerequisite 
to junior standing. At the beginning of the junior year students select 
an option. 

The option in wood products manufacturing trains men for supervisory 
and production positions in the manufacture of such products as lumber, 
veneer, plywood, particle board, dimension stock, furniture, cabinets, mill- 
work, and flooring. 

The wood products economics and management option stresses the 
fields of business administration and economics and trains men for careers 
in merchandising and administration in the wood processing industries, the 
construction industry, or with material suppliers. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in wood 
technology. A minimum of 151 credits is required for graduation. 

Opportunities — A career with wood industries offers a variety of op- 
portunities for young men trained in wood properties, manufacturing op- 
erations and business methods. The application of new processes and 
materials in the conversion of timber into the thousands of wood products 
has created a demand for technically trained men. Companies manufact- 
uring lumber, veneer and plywood, hardwood dimension stock, furniture, 
millwork, flooring, pianos, caskets, wood turnings, adhesives, preservatives, 
finishing materials, and composition boards are types of industries in- 
terested in employing graduates. 

CURRICULUM IN WOOD TECHNOLOGY 

For freshman year see page 146. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credit* 

EC 201, General Economics 3 *CH 203, General and Organic 

ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 3 Chemistry 4 

FOR 202, Wood Structure and FOR 203. Wood Structure and 

Properties I 3 Properties II 8 

••MA 211, Calculus 8 **MA 212, Calculus 3 

••PY 211, General Physics 4 **PY 212. General Physics 4 

MS 201, Military Science MS 202, Military Science 

or or 

AS 221, Air Science 1 AS 222, Air Science 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

18 16 

• Students planning to elect CH 425, 426, should substitute CH 211 or 215 for CH 203. 
•• Students who have completed MA 101, 102, should take MA 201, 202, and PY 201, 202. 



150 



School Of Forestry 



SUMMER PRACTICUM 



First Session Wood Prodocta 

Praeticum Five Weeks 

FOR 205-S, Wood Machining 

Praeticum 
FOR 206-S, Wood Drying 

Praeticum 
FOR 207-S, Gluing Praeticum 
FOR 208-S, Wood Finishing 

Praeticum 
FOR 209-S, Plant Inspections 



Credits 



Credits 



Second Session Wood 

Praeticum Five Weeks 

FOR 210-S, Mensuration Praeticum 
FOR 211-S, Logging and Milling 

Praeticum 
FOR 212-S, Graphic Methods 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EM 311, Mechanics I (Statics) 

FOR 301, Wood Processes I 

FOR 512, Forest Economics 

ST 361, Statistics for Engineers 

Technical Electives 

Electives 



Credits 
8 
4 
3 



IS 



Spring Semester 
EM 321, Strength of Materials 
ENG 321, Scientific Writing 
FOR 802, Wood Processes II 

Technical Electives 

Electives 



Credits 

8 
8 
4 
S 
5 

18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

FOR 434, Wood Operations I 

FOR 621, Wood Chemistry 

Technical Electives 

Electives 



Credits 
8 
3 
3 
9 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 436, Wood Operations II 8 

FOR 441, Design of Wood 

Structures 3 

FOR 591, Wood Technology Problems 3 
Technical Electives 8 

Electives 6 

18 



Fields of Specialization— At the beginning of the junior year, students 
with exceptional academic records may, with the approval of the faculty, 
elect the Honors Program. Other students will elect one of the following 
options. When an option is chosen the student will select at least two 
courses from one area of emphasis and at least one course from each of 
the other two areas of emphasis. The remaining elective hours are to be 
courses selected by the student in consultation with his adviser to best fit 
his particular interests. 



WOOD PRODUCTS MANUFACTURING OPTION 



OPERATIONS ANALYSIS 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



STATISTICS 



EC 450, Economic Decision 

Processes 
EC 552, Econometrics 
EC 310, Economics of the Firm 
EC 432, Industrial Relations 
ST 515, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 
ST 516, Experimental Statistics 

for Engineers 



Credits 



School Of Forestry 



151 



WOOD PRODUCTS ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT OPTION 



ECONOMICS 



OPERATIONS ANALYSIS 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



EC 301, Production and Prices 
EC 802, National Income and 

Economic Welfare 
EC 448, International Trade 

EC 450, Economic Decision 

Processes 
EC 552, Econometrics 

EC 310, Economics of the Firm 
EC 312, Elements of Accounting 
EC 425, Industrial Management 



Credits 
8 



PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 



Professor R. G. Hitchings, Acting In Charge 



Curriculum — The curriculum in pulp and paper technology trains men 
for technical work in the rapidly growing pulp and paper industry. Grad- 
uates are prepared for careers as pulp technologists, paper mill chemists, 
quality control specialists, and mill superintendents. After a thorough 
background in basic sciences, the program offers special work in wood 
pulping processes, chemical and by-products recovery, pulp bleaching, 
and the various papermaking operations such as refining, sizing, filling, 
coloring, coating, and converting. 

The pulp and paper industry ranks fifth among all American industries. 
In 1956 pulp and paper products were valued at 10.7 billions of dollars and 
the industry employed more than 400,000 skilled workers in the mills. This 
is primarily a Southern industry with 60 per cent of the nation's pulpwood 
produced in the South. 

Financially supported by more than 70 major companies, this program 
was created to meet the critical need for trained men. It is a regional 
program and has been approved by the Southern Regional Education 
Board as the one undergraduate program to serve the Southeast in this 
field. A number of scholarships are available. The new $425,000 Robertson 
Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Technology provides this program with 
outstanding facilities. 

All students majoring in this curriculum are required to spend at least 
one summer working in a pulp or paper mill where arrangements have 
been made by the college for such employment. Three hours of academic 
credit are granted the student after completion of 12 weeks of mill work 
and presentation of a satisfactory report covering this work experience. 
In addition to this minimum summer work requirement, students are urged 
to work in mills the two remaining summers between academic years be- 
cause of the great value of practical experience in this industry. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in pulp and 
paper technology. A minimum of 151 credits is required for graduation. 



152 School Of Forestry 

CURRICULUM IN PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 

For freshman year see page 146. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 215, Quantitative Analysis 

FOR 202, Structure and Properties 

of Wood I 
•MA 211, Calculus 
*PY 211, General Physics 
MS 201, Military Science 

or 
AS 221, Air Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 
Electives 

19 20 

• Students who have completed MA 101, 102 should take MA 201, 202 and PY 201. 202. 



Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 

8 
8 
4 


ENG 231, Basic Speaking Skills 

ENG 321, Scientific Writing 

FOR 342, Fiber Analysis 

•MA 212, Calculus 

»PY 212, General Physics 

MS 202, Military Science 


3 
3 
2 
3 
4 


1 

1 
3 


or 
AS 222, Air Science 
PE 202, Physical Education 
Electives 


1 
1 
3 



SUMMER 



FOR 491, Forestry Problems. 
Mill Experience 



Credits 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CHE 301, Elements of 

Chemical Engineering 
CH 341, Physical Chemistry 
CH 425, Organic Chemistry 
FOR 321, Pulp and Paper 

Technology 
ME 304, Fundamentals Of 

Heat Power 
PSY 200, General Psychology 

Electives 



Credits 



21 



Spring Semester 
CHE 302, Elements of 

Chemical Engineering 
CH 342, Physical Chemistry 
CH 426, Organic Chemistry 
EC 201, General Economics 
EE 350, Electrical Applications in 

Wood Products 
FOR 322, Pulp and Paper 

Technology 



Credits 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

FOR 411, Pulp and Paper Mill 

Equipment 
FOR 413, Paper Testing Labor- 
atory 
FOR 451, Paper Coloring 

Laboratory 
FOR 461, Paper Converting 
FOR 471, Pulp Technology 

Laboratory 
FOR 521, Wood Chemistry 

Social Science Electives 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

FOR 403, Paper Technology 

Laboratory 
FOR 412, Pulp and Paper Mill 

Equipment 
FOR 463, Plant Inspections 
FOR 482, Pulp and Paper Mill 

Management 
FOR 522, Wood Chemistry 

Social Electives 

Electives 



Credits 



18 



17 



School of General Studies 



SCHOOL OF GENERAL STUDIES 



Fred V. Cahill, Dean 



When it became the Land-Grant College of North Carolina, State College 
inherited a long tradition of education, calling for furnishing maximum 
service to all the citizens of the state. Its progress from the first, there- 
fore, embraced the finest technical training based on the most thorough 
research, coupled with the humane and social studies necessary in devel- 
oping individuals of the highest character and civic responsibility. From 
the beginning, State College, like other Land-Grant colleges, has taken 
as its goal this two-fold function: training men of professional and tech- 
nical leadership who are at the same time men of social leadership, whole 
men able to live as enlightened free citizens in our democratic state. 

With the consolidation of the State College into the University of North 
Carolina in 1935, this double function was given further recognition. A 
Basic Division was formed which, without granting degrees in liberal arts, 
was to form a broad base on which all technical education was to be 
built. Specifically, the Basic Division was charged with instruction in the 
fields of humanities and social sciences, physical education and recreation, 
and was committed to provide the opportunities in general education neces- 
sary for a well-rounded program in all the technical fields pursued by 
State College students. In this, the Basic Division was in effect an integral 
part of all the technical schools, since it brought to bear on all students of 
all academic years the impact of instruction in the area of the humanities 
and social sciences to implement instruction in technical and professional 
subjects in the degree-granting schools. That this instruction was deemed 
significant at State College is shown by the fact that the portion of cur- 
ricular time devoted to these studies gradually increased until more than 
one-fourth of class instruction was done in the areas embraced by the 
Basic Division. Further recognition of the importance of the general ed- 
ucation of technical students came with the action of the Board of 
Trustees in May, 1952, when the Basic Division was renamed the School 
of General Studies and placed on an equal basis with the technical schools 
of State College. 

Objectives — The over-all objectives of the School of General Studies 
have become clear through the years. Its purposes are to develop the stu- 
dent's communication and reading skills through the study of language 
and literature; to increase his understanding of the complex economic, 
social political, and philosophical world in which he will live and work; 
to develop in him a sense of social responsibility as a scientist and technical 
leader in the world of technology and science; to teach him to think criti- 
cally and scientifically in the social world of men as he does in the material 
world of his profession; to quicken his appreciation of the role played 
by both science and the arts in human affairs. Beyond the fundamental 
training in these fields as required by the technical curricula of the schools, 
the School of General Studies also provides additional elective work in 
these areas in order that each student may pursue further his own interests. 

Organization — The School of General Studies includes the Departments 
of Economics, English, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, 
Philosophy and Religion, Physical Education, Social Studies, and Sociology 
and Anthropology. The dean and the department heads constitute the 
Administrative Board of the School of General Studies. This board works 
with the school faculty in matters of policy and instruction. 



156 School Of General Studies 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Ernst W. Swanson, Head of the Department 

Professors C. B. Shulenberger, T. W. Wood 

Associate Professors A. J. Bartley, Robert L. Bunting, E A. Fails, Cleon 

Harrell, B. M. Olsen 
Assistant Professors Gerald Garb, T. Hardie Park, Ching-Sheng Shen, 0. G. 

Thompson 
Lecturers D. R. Dixon, M. A. Hunt 
Instructors William R. Hendley, N. E. Piland, William J. Stober, W. A. 

Walters 

The Department of Economics seeks to help students understand the 
economic process, the nature and functioning of the economy and useful 
approaches to and methods of economic analysis. In pursuance of this 
end the department has a representative offering of courses in the major 
fields of economic theory, applied economics and business operation at both 
undergraduate and graduate levels. Several courses have been designed 
primarily for students working toward advanced degrees in the technical 
schools. Members of the department are also engaged in extension work 
and economic research. 



ENGLISH 

Professor Lodwick Hartley, Head of the Department 

Professors J. D. Clark, A. M. Fountain, H. G. Kincheloe, R. P. Marshall, 

John W. Shirley, R. G. Walser 
Associate Professors P. H. Davis, E. H. Paget, D. J. Rulfs, A. B. R. Shelley, 

Jack Suberman, L. H. Swain, L. R. Whichard, R. B. Wynne 
Assistant Professors William Barnhart, H. G. Eldridge, R. W. Goldsmith, 

Max Halperen, Sadie J. Harmon, A. S. Knowles, B. G. Koonce, F. H. 

Moore, Norwood Smith, Porter Williams, Jr. 
Lecturer Hazel Griffin 
Instructors Larry Champion, J. B. Easley, Harry Hargrave, C. W. Martin, 

Jack Porter, Michael Reynolds, Huldah B. Turner, R. B. White 

The English Department has, as its primary objective instruction in the 
basic communication skills: reading, writing, and speaking. To this end it 
offers a course in the fundamentals of composition which attempts to com- 
bine the three skills, plus special courses in business and technical com- 
munications and in speech. As an additional function, the department 
provides a core of humanistic studies consisting of courses in English, 
American, and World literature. The principal objective of these courses 
is to make the student aware of his cultural heritage and to develop in 
him good habits of leisure reading. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Preston W. Edsall, Head of the Department 

Professors M. L. Brown, Jr., F. V. Cahill, J. T. Caldwell, S. Noblin, L. W. 

Seegers 
Associate Professors L. W. Barnhardt, W. J. Block, A. Holtzman 
Assistant Professors B. F. Beers, M. S. Downs, J. L. Helguera, C. F. Kolb, 

L. F. Reitzer 
Instructor 0. H. Orr, Jr. 



School Of General Studies 157 

An understanding of the historical background of our times and of polit- 
ical principles and governmental systems is expected of the educated man. 
This department, by giving specially designed courses, both elective and 
required, seeks to aid students in gaining this understanding. While most 
courses offered in history and political science are intended for under- 
graduates, the department offers a few graduate courses which may be 
built into the programs of students working for advanced degrees. It also 
cooperates with the College Extension Division in making selected courses 
available to adults who are not resident on the State College campus. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



Professor George W. Poland, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor S. T. Ballenger 

Assistant Professors F. J. Allred, Ruth B. Hall, Harold L. Titus 
Instructor S. Simonsen 



The Department of Modern Languages provides instruction in French, 
German, Spanish, Italian, and Russian as well as special instruction in 
English for foreign students. It also offers courses in the literature and 
culture of these language areas. 

The department cooperates with graduate and research programs by 
offering special courses for graduate students in connection with language 
requirements for advanced degrees and by providing translation service. 
Graduate students enrolled in technical and scientific courses translate 
projects in their field of major interest. Upon satisfactory completion of 
these projects, they are accepted as evidence of reading ability in the 
particular language. The translations are then made available to individuals 
or agencies. 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 



Professor W. N. Hicks, Head of the Department 

Associate Professors Paul A. Bredenberg, J. Leonard Middleton 

Assistant Professors W. Curtis Fitzgerald, Jr., W. Lawrence Highfill 



The primary function of the Department of Philosophy and Religion 
is to provide basic courses in philosophy and religion especially designed to 
serve students in the several professional schools of the college — courses that 
are fundamental in the sense that the utility of critical analysis and the na- 
ture of faith are stressed and related to student experience. Since in matters 
religious and philosophical no universally acceptable final answers have been 
achieved, it is imperative that able and systematic and free examination of 
creedal beliefs and metaphysical assumptions in all areas be vigorously and 
unceasingly continued. Only in this way can faith be kept vital, rigid pro- 
vincialism thwarted and the significant intellectual achievements of the past 
and present conserved and advanced. 

Personal challenge is extended to the student to live more fully in all 
of his relationships in terms of the high motives of love and reason, and 
to seek ultimate adjustment, not in passive conformity, but in duty freely 
accepted and unique creativity dared. 



158 School Of General Studies 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Professor Paul H. Derr, Head of the Department 

Professor William E. Smith 

Professor Emeritus John F. Miller 

Associate Professors Harold Keating, John F. Kenfield, Jr., J. B. Edwards 

Assistant Professors A. M. Hoch, W. R. Leonhardt, J. H. Little, Frank J. 

Murray 
Instructors J. L. Clements, N. E. Cooper, H. 0. Floyd, Jr., W. M. Shea, 

W. H. Sonner 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to make a 
maximum contributions to the general welfare of the student by providing 
programs and conditions in which he may develop and maintain physical 
strength and stamina, relax tensions, acquire an appreciation for the 
importance of healthful living and develop knowledge and skills for 
recreation. The programs also provide situations in which the student may 
develop qualities of cooperation, leadership, and social poise. 

To achieve these aims, the department serves two functions. It provides 
instruction and supervision for the participant in physical education in 
regular classes; and it offers opportunities for all students to participate 
in beneficial forms of physical exercise through the program in intramural 
athletics, which is administered by the department. 



SOCIAL STUDIES 



Professor George A. Gullette, Head of the Department 

Professors C. I. Foster, E. M. Halliday, J. R. Lambert, Jr., A. K. F. 

McKean 
Assistant Professors W. F. Edwards R. N. Elliott, Robert S. Metzger 
Instructors R. V. Brickell, J. L. Cole 



The Department of Social Studies draws its staff from the various 
fields of the humanities and the social sciences. It contributes to the training 
of men whose professional competence is devoted to the public interest by 
offering courses especially designed to emphasize the close interconnections 
that bind liberal studies to the world of science and technology. 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



Professor Sanford Winston, Head of the Department 
Associate Professors E. H. Johnson, H. D. Rawls 
Assistant Professors Herbert Collins, John W. Tomlin 



Courses offered by the department fall into three overlapping areas: 
courses concerned with the general education of the student; supporting 
courses in those curricula in which a knowledge of society and human be- 
havior is deemed essential; and courses given in conjunction with other 
departments which help prepare the student for rather specific types of 
professional activity upon graduation. 



School Of General Studies 



159 



being operates within a social world which i* l!S i i the human 
development, and he is encouraged to £ V T- «i!?- 1f- ult of J ongr cultural 

problems. «^cning as well as in conferences on individual 




•-. i* -* 



THE COLLEGE Union is one of the nation's modern student centers. Among the 
features of the building are a 1 60-seat theater, game room, hobby shop, ballroom, 
private banquet rooms, snack bar, and a main lounge. 



College Union 



*mmjmm 




STATE students relax in the College Union's main lounge. 



School of Physical Sciences 
and Applied Mathematics 



SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

Arthur Clayton Menius, Jr., Dean 

Carey G. Mumford, Assistant to the Dean 

The events of the past several years have re-emphasized the need for an 
increasing supply of high calibre scientists, mathematicians, and engineers. 
To serve the state and nation better in the endeavor to produce such out- 
standing individuals, North Carolina State College formed in 1960 a new 
School consisting of the Departments of Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, 
and Experimental Statistics. The creation of this school reaffirmed the fact 
that strong educational and research opportunities in the basic sciences and 
mathematics are fundamentally necessary and are important adjuncts to 
successful programs in the applied fields. 

Objectives — The School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics 
has two missions at North Carolina State College: the training of scientists 
and mathematicians; and the technical support of curricula in agriculture, 
education, textiles, forestry, design, and engineering. 

Facilities — The School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics is 
fully equipped for instruction and research. Special equipment and labora- 
tories associated with the departments of the school are a complete radio- 
chemistry laboratory; a low power homogeneous reactor and a heterogene- 
ous reactor designed for 100 kw; a one million volt Van de Graaff accelera- 
tor; two analog computers, GEDA and Donner; and an IBM 650 digital 
computer supplemented by access to the Univac 1105 at the University of 
North Carolina Computation Center at Chapel Hill. Other facilities on the 
campus available for teaching and research include an RCA electron micro- 
scope, complete X-ray laboratories with diffraction and radiographic equip- 
ment, and precision instrument shops. 

Curricula — It is intended that the undergraduate degree for the school 
be Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry, physics, applied mathe- 
matics or experimental statistics. The curricula of the Departments of 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics are so arranged as to have 
essentially a common freshman year. Because of this, a student entering any 
one of these curricula can, without penalty, change to another department 
in the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics during his 
freshman year. This common year is outlined below. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fail Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101, General Inorganic CH 103, General and Qualitative 

Chemistry 4 Chemistry 4 
or or 

CH 102, General Inorganic CH 104, General and Qualitative 

Chemistry and 4 Chemistry and 4 

CH 102L, General Inorganic CH 104L. General and Qualitative 

Chemistry Laboratory 1 Chemistry Laboratory 1 

ENG 111, English Composition S ENG 112, English Composition 3 

MA 101, Algebra and Trigonometry 5 MA 102, Analytic Geometry and 

PE 101, Physical Education 1 Calculus I 4 

MS 101, Military Science I PE 102. Physical Education 1 

or MS 102, Military Science I 

AS 121, Air Science I 1 or 

Humanities 3 AS 122, Air Science I 1 

or or Humanities 3 

Natural Science 4 or 



Natural Science 



i; 



17 



The total number of hours required is to be a minimum of 138 hours which includes 8 
hours of Military Science and Physical Education. 

Twenty-one semester hours are to be required in the Humanities, exclusive of Freshman 
English. An additional requirement is on* modern language. An Orientation Program 
for all freshmen is required. 



164 Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 

Graduate Study — The Master of Science degree is offered by each de- 
partment of the school with the doctorate available in physics and statis- 
tics. The graduate programs are described in detail in the Graduate School 
Catalog. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor Ralph Clay Swann, Head of the Department 

Professors Thomas Glenn Bowery, Richard Henry Loeppert, Walter John 
Peterson, Willis Alton Reid, Cowin Cook Robinson, George Howard 
Satterfield, Paul Porter Sutton, Samuel B. Tove, Joseph Arthur Wey- 
brew 

Associate Professors David Marshall Cates, Alonzo Freeman Coots, Ray- 
mond Cyrus White 

Assistant Professors Thomas Jacks Blalock, William Prentiss Ingram, Jr., 
George Gilbert Long, Edward Carroll Sisler 

Instructors John Lovell Hall, William Rodgers Johnston, Mrs. Carole Lash- 
insky, Mrs. Elizabeth Manning, John Wesley Morgan, George Motley 
Oliver, Mrs. Graye Shaw, Thomas Marsh Ward 

Objective — The principal objective is to provide sound basic training in 
chemistry and the related sciences. Emphasis is placed on aiding and en- 
couraging creative thinking. 

Curriculum — The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science degree in chem- 
istry is designed to give the students fundamental training in mathematics 
and the biological and physical sciences with maximum instruction in 
chemistry. Graduates in chemistry are provided with a sound foundation for 
future graduate study. 

The curriculum meets the requirements of the American Chemical Society 
for the training of professional chemists. 



CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 

* See page 163 for the freshman curriculum. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fail Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 211, Quantitative Analysis 4 CH 212, Quantitative Analysis 4 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and MA 202, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 Calculus III 4 

PY 201, General Physics 6 PY 202, General Physics 6 

English 3 English 3 

MS 201, Military Science II 1 MS 202, Military Science II 1 

or or 

AS 221, Air Science II AS 222, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

18 18 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 421, Organic Chemistry 6 CH 422, Organic Chemistry 5 

CH 531, Physical Chemistry 3 CH 532, Physical Chemistry 3 

CH 531L, Physical Chemistry CH 532L, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 1 Laboratory 1 

ML 103, Elementary German 8 ML 104, German Grammar and 

**Minor 3 or 4 Prose Reading 3 
**Minor 3 or 4 



15-16 



15-16 



Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 165 



Fall Semester 
***Major 
••Minor 
••••Humanities 
Free Electives 



SENIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 

or 4 

6 

6 


•••Major 
••Minor 
••••Humanities 
Free Electives 


8 

3 or 4 

8 

10 



18-19 19-20 



* Chemistry majors are required to take CH 102, 104 and CH 102L, 104L. 

•* The Chemistry Department will recognize as a minor four semester courses in the 

biological sciences, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Any combination of four 

courses from two of these areas will constitute a "split" minor. The courses applied to 

a mmor should exhibit the applications of chemistry in the areas chosen. This sequence 

is to be chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor prior to the third year of study. 

*** Three of the basic year courses in cheimstry are to be required for admission to the 

advanced course or courses. 

**•* If no humanities are taken in the freshman year, a total of 15 credits should be 

scheduled for the senior year. 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



Professor J. A. Rigney, Head of the Department 

Professors R. L. Anderson, C. C. Cockerham, R. J. Hader, H. L. Lucas, 

D. D. Mason, R. J. Monroe, R. G. D. Steel 
Adjunct Professors W. S. Connor, A. L. Finkner, G. S. Watson 
Professor Emeritus Gertrude M. Cox 
Associate Professors A. H. E. Grandage, F. E. McVay, C. H. Proctor, D. R. 

Shreve, W. W. G. Smart 
Assistant Professors W. J. Hall, J. C. Koop (Visiting), F. J. Verlinden, 

T. D. Wallace 
Associate Statistician B. B. Bhattacharyya (Visiting) 
Assistant Statisticians M. A. Cipolloni, W. S. Overton, J. 0. Rawlings, 

B. J. Stines 

Statistics is a relatively new and rapidly expanding science. Popular 
usage of the word "statistics" is to describe "classified facts stated as 
numbers". The same word is also used or the body of scientific methodology 
which deals with efficient collection and presentation of data and with the 
general problem of drawing valid and reliable inferences from data. Early 
development of statistics occurred in the biological and social sciences. In 
recent years the use of statistical concepts and methodology has spread into 
virtually all areas of scientific endeavor, especially the physical sciences 
and engineering. 

The Department of Experimental Statistics is part of the Institute of 
Statistics which also includes a Department of Biostatistics and a Depart- 
ment of Statistics at Chapel Hill. The Department of Experimental Statis- 
tics provides instruction, consultation and computational services on re- 
search projects, for other departments of all schools at North Carolina 
State College, including the Agricultural Experiment Station. Govern- 
mental agencies and other institutions use the facilities of the department. 
The range and quality of the data handled furnish an excellent back- 
ground for training students in the use of statistical procedures in such 
fields as the physical, biological and social sciences and in industrial de- 
velopment and engineering. 

Opportunities — Most fields of research, development, production, and 
distribution are seeking persons trained in statistical methods and theory. 
Research groups are fast realizing the importance of statistical aids in 
planning experiments and in analyzing and computing results. Industry is 
placing increasing reliance on statistical methods to control the quality of 
goods in the process of manufacture and to determine the acceptability of 



166 



Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 



goods already produced. Statistical procedures are becoming basic tools 
for making weather forecasts, crop and livestock estimates, business trend 
predictions, opinion polls and the like. 

A graduate in statistics will find abundant opportunities in any of the 
areas listed above — both in industry and with federal and state agencies. 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS CURRICULUM 



Assuming BO 103 and ZO 103 were elected during the freshman year, a typical program 
(or the succeeding three years might be as follows: 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MA 201. Calculus I 

PY 201, General Physics 

EC 201, Economics 

Foreign Language 
MS 201, Military Science 
PE 201, Physical Education 



Fall Semester 

ST 361, Introduction to Statistics 
MA 301, Differential Equations 
PSY 200, Introduction to 

Psychology 
ENG 321, Scientific Writing 

Minor 

Humanities 



Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 
6 
3 
3 
1 
1 


MA 202, Calculus II 
PY 202, General Physics 
EC 202, Economics 

Foreign Language 
MS 202, Military Science 
PE 202, Physical Education 


4 

5 
3 
3 
1 

1 


17 




17 


JUNIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


8 

3 

3 

3 
3 


ST 362, Introduction to Statistics 
ST 302, IBM Laboratory 

Minor 

Humanities 

Free Electives 


8 
2 
8 
8 

6 



18 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ST 521, Basic Statistical Theory 

ST 615, Experimental Statistics for 

Engineers 

Minor 

Humanities 

Free Electives 



Credits 

4 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ST 522, Basic Statistical Theory 4 
ST 516, Experimental Statistics for 

Engineers 8 

Minor 3 

Humanities 8 

Free Electives 4 

17 



Graduate — The Department of Experimental Statistics offers work lead- 
ing to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Minor work 
may be taken in any of the wide variety of research programs on the 
campus. In addition, a cooperative arrangement with the Departments of 
Biostatistics and Statistics at Chapel Hill provides for minor work in health 
affairs and in statistical theory. Active participation in the graduate faculty 
by several of the staff at the Research Triangle Institute provides further 
strength of staff and a wider variety of research experience available to 
graduate students. 

The department has at least one staff member who consults with re- 
searchers in each of the following fields and who conducts his own research 
on statistical problems which are encountered: the various agricultural 
sciences, quantitative genetics, industry and engineering, physical sciences 
and social sciences. In addition there is active research in the general fields 
of experimental design and sample surveys. 



Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 



167 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor John W. Cell, Head of the Department 

Professors R. C. Bullock, J. M. Clarkson, W. J. Harrington, Jack Levine, 

G. G. Mumford, H. M. Nahikian, Graduate Administrator, H. V. Park, 

R. A. Struble, J. H. Wahab, H. P. Williams, L. S. Winton 
Associate Professors G. C. Caldwell, C. Kassimatis, A. R. Nolstad, D. M. 

Peterson, H. A. Petrea, H. E. Speece, C. J. Standish (Visiting), G. C. 

Watson 
Assistant Professors V. R. Brantley, E. J. Canaday, H. C. Cooke, R. R. 

Korfhage, C. F. Lewis, C. H. Little, Jr., Morton Lowengrub, R. A. 

MacKerracher, A. Maltbie, P. Shahdan, J. B. Wilson 
Instructors C. N. Anderson, J. W. Bishir, Joyce Caraway, Martha J. Gar- 

ren, Ruth B. Honeycutt, D. E. Nixon, Carlotta P. Patton, J. L. Sox 

Objectives — There is great need in industry and in the field of teaching 
for people trained in applied mathematics. The increasing use of both digi- 
tal and analog computers and the shift to automation in industry have given 
rise to requirements for mathematics analysts. The Department of Mathe- 
matics offers opportunities in the elementary and advanced courses for the 
student to learn important concepts in mathematics and to apply these to 
situations in mathematically oriented areas. 

Curriculum — The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science degrees in applied 
mathematics is designed to provide the student with a sound foundation in 
mathematics and at the same time to give him a reasonable acquaintance 
with some other area of science or engineering. Required courses are rela- 
tively few in number so that the individual needs of the student are met 
more readily. The individual curriculum can be designed either to fit the 
needs of a student for a position in industry or to provide him a strong 
foundation for future graduate work. 

MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM 



For freshman rear see page 163. 



Fall Semester 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 
PY 201, General Physics 
ENG 205, Reading for Discovery 
PE 201, Physical Education 
MS 201, Military Science II 

or 
AS 221, Air Science II 
'Modern Language 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 

A 
6 
3 
1 



Spring Semester 

MA 202, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 
PY 202, General Physics 
EC 206, Economic Process 

or 
HI 205, Modern Western World 
PE 202, Physical Education 
MS 202, Military Science II 

or 
AS 222, Air Science II 
•Modern Language 



Credit* 



17 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 301, Differential Equations 3 

MA 611, Advanced Calculus 3 

ST 361. Introduction to Statistics 3 

••♦Major 6 

••••Minor 6 

••Junior, Senior Humanities 6 

Free Electives 9 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 535, Mathematics of Computers 3 

MA 512, Advanced Calculus 8 

ST 362, Introduction to Statistics 3 

••♦Major 6 

••••Minor C 

••Junior, Senior Humanities 6 

Free Electives 8 



It is desirable that MA 611, 612 be taken at the earliest possible time in the junior-senior 
years. 



• The particular language chosen is subject to the approval of the department head. 

•• These junior-senior humanities generally should be chosen from humanities offerings at 

the 300 level and above. 

••• To be chosen from mathematics offerings at the 400-500 level. 

•••• The minor field is, as a minimum, a four course sequence from one other area, and 

these courses normally should exhibit the application of mathematics in this area. They 

are not to include any course from this area that is otherwise applied in satisfying the 

requirements of this curriculum. This minor is to be chosen in consultation with the 

student's adviser prior to the junior year and this choice is subject to the approval of the 

department head. 



168 Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 

Graduate Study — The Department of Mathematics feels that a student 
entering the Graduate School to work toward the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence in applied mathematics should be well grounded in mathematics through 
at least two terms of advanced calculus (or the equivalent). In addition, he 
should have a strong background in mechanics and physics, or in some 
branch of engineering. 

Minimum course requirements for the degree of Master of Science in ap- 
plied mathematics are 30 hours of which six to nine hours must be selected 
from a minor field which is usually some branch of engineering, physics, 
or statistics. In addition to the above requirements, the student must write 
a thesis and show a satisfactory reading knowledge of a foreign language. 

For more detailed information see the Graduate Catalog. 



PHYSICS 

Burlington Professor Raymond L. Murray, Head of the Department 
Professors Forrest W. Lancaster, J. S. Meares, A. C. Menius, Jr., R. H. 

Snyder, Newton Underwood, A. W. Waltner 
Visiting Professor Maurice M. Surdin 
Associate Professors W. 0. Doggett, J. T. Lynn, Graduate Administrator, 

R. F. Stainback 
Assistant Professors E. J. Brown, Grover C. Cobb, Jr., William R. Davis, 

Raoul M. Freyre, D. H. Martin 
Instructors E. R. Kirkland, Hubert L. Owen 
Director of the Reactor Project E. Jack Story 

Objectives — Physics is a fundamental science of observations, measure- 
ment and mathematical description of the particles and processes of nature. 
Included are the classical areas of mechanics, heat, sound, optics, electricity 
magnetism, plus modern physics, embracing atomic and nuclear particles 
and phenomena. In addition to the extension of basic knowledge, physics 
provides an attack on problems of importance in engineering and industrial 
development. 

Opportunities — The demand for graduates with fundamental and special- 
ized knowledge in physics has grown rapidly in recent years. The needs 
for scientists are currently greatest in the nuclear energy and missile 
fields, in which large research and development programs are in progress. 
Positions are available to qualified individuals in government laboratories, 
industrial research facilities and in universities. 

Typical curricula emphasizing physics and nuclear science are outlined 
below. 

PHYSICS CURRICULUM 

The freshman year is found in detail on page 163. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 201, General Physics 5 PY 202, General Physics 5 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and MA 202, Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 Calculus III 4 

Foreign Language 8 Foreign Language 3 

Humanities 3 *Minor 4 

MS 201, Military Science II MS 202, Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, Air Science II 1 AS 222, Air Science II 1 

PE 201, Physical Education 1 PE 202, Physical Education 1 

17 18 



Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 



169 



Fall Semester 
PY 407, Modern Physics 
PY 401, Mechanics 
MA 301, Differential Equations 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
English 
•Minor 



JUNIOR 


YEAR 






Credits 


Spring 


Semester 


Credits 


8 
4 
8 
3 
8 
3 


PY 410, 
PY 402, 
SS 302. 


Nuclear Physics 1 
i Heat and Sound 
Contemporary Civilization 
Mathematics 
Free Electives 


4 
4 
3 
3 
4 



19 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PY 403, Electricity and Magnetism 4 
MA 532, Differential Equations II 3 

SS 391, Contemporary Issues 3 

♦Minor 4 

Free Electives 8 



17 



Spring Semester 

PY 404, Optics 

PHI 405, Foundations of Science 

Mathematics 

Free Electives 



Credits 

4 
3 
3 
6 



16 



NUCLEAR SCIENCE EMPHASIS CURRICULUM 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PY 201, General Physics 

MA 201, Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus II 
Foreign Language 
Humanities 

MS 201, Military Science II 
or 

AS 221, Air Science II 

PE 201, Physical Education 



Credits 


Spring 


Semester 


Credits 


6 

4 

3 
3 


PY 202, 
MA 202 

MS 202, 


General Physics 
, Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus III 
Foreign Language 
Humanities 
Military Science II 


5 

4 
3 
3 


1 
1 


AS 222, 
PE 202, 


or 

Air Science II 
Physical Education 


1 
1 



17 



17 



Fall Semester 

PY 407. Modern Physics 

PY 401, Mechanics 

or 
PY 403, Electricity and Magnetism 
SS 301, Contemporary Civilization 
MA 301, Differential Equations 
Free Electives 



JUNIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 
4 


PY 410, Nuclear Physics I 
PY 402, Heat and Sound 


4 
4 


3 
3 

4 


or 

PY 404, Optics 

SS 302, Contemporary Civilization 

English 

Mathematics 


3 
8 
8 



17 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PY 530, Introduction to Nuclear 

Reactor Theory 
PY 510, Nuclear Physics II 
MA 532, Differential Equations II 
SS 491, Contemporary Issues 

Free Electives 



Credits 



19 



Spring Semester 

PY 520, Physical Measurements i 

Radioactivity 
PY 518, Radiation Hazards and 

Protection 
PHI 401, Foundations of Science 
Mathematics 
Minor 
Free Elective 



Credits 



IS 



* If mathematics is the chosen minor, other science courses may be substituted with appro- 
val of advisor. 
** Major in physics, minor in nuclear science. 



170 Physical Sciences And Applied Mathematics 

Graduate Study — The Department of Physics provides programs of ad- 
vanced study in applied physics leading to the Master's and Doctor's de- 
grees. A comprehensive understanding of classical and modern physics is 
stressed with study in either nuclear science or fundamental physics avail- 
able. The areas of specialization include experimental nuclear and reactor 
physics, nuclear reactor theory, plasma physics, space propulsion and in- 
strumentation, and the theory of fields. A research thesis is required for 
both degrees. Research facilities available include a 10-kilowatt hetero- 
geneous reactor, a 100-watt water boiler reactor, a natural uranium sub- 
critical assembly, a one Mev Van de Graaff accelerator and a plasma physics 
laboratory. Minor work will generally be taken in other departments of the 
School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics. 



School of Textiles 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Malcolm E. Campbell, Dean 

James W. Klibbe, Academic Coordinator 



Food, clothing, and shelter are recognized as the three basic needs of 
man, and as a corollary the manufacture of textiles has become one of the 
world's leading industries. From early beginnings as an occupation governed 
by tradition and rule of thumb the textile industry has advanced to a 
highly complex, technical stage. 

North Carolina has risen steadily with the growth of textiles until it 
now ranks first in the nation in terms of employment and value of manu- 
factured products. Furthermore, the textile industry of the state and the 
area is broadly diversified, ranging from the production of man-made fibers 
to finished garments, from cotton spinning mills to finishing plants, from 
woven goods to all types of knitted materials, and from supplies to machine 
manufacturers. 

Because of the tremendous expansion in the scope of textiles it has become 
necessary to utilize the talents of the chemist, the physicist, the engineer, 
the businessman, as well as the traditional weaver, spinner, and dyer. 

The School of Textiles offers several programs at both the undergraduate 
and graduate levels, in the applied sciences underlying the production and 
finishing of textile products. Textile research supplements and supports 
graduate study. 

The purpose of the school is fourfold: to educate men and women for 
professional service in all phases of the textile industry; to develop their 
capacities for intelligent leadership; to aid in the economic development of 
the textile industry; and to cooperate with the textile industry in improving, 
through scientific research, manufacturing efficiency and the quality and 
value of manufactured products. 

For administration, the School of Textiles is organized into four depart- 
ments: Textile Technology, Knitting Technology, Textile Chemistry, and 
Textile Research. 

Curricula — The School of Textiles offers two basic four-year curricula 
textile technology and textile chemistry. After the freshman year these 
two programs differ; however, there is sufficient similarity in the first year 
to permit the student to defer the final decision as to his major field of 
study until the end of the freshman year. 

The over-all program of the textile technology curriculum includes 
course work in the basic sciences and humanities as well as in the pro- 
fessional area of textiles. The arrangement of stems within the curriculum 
permits for specialization in various areas which lead in one direction to 
a high concentration of work in the basic sciences and in the other direction 
to greater depth in the study of economics. The various avenues of selec- 
tion open to the students are as follows, with specialization as indicated- 
fiber and yarn technology, fabric technology, general textiles, knitting 
technology, and textile management. 

The latter program provides substantial depth in the fundamentals of 
economics as well as work in the basic sciences, humanities, and professional 
textile areas. It is believed that this program provides a firm foundation 
on which to develop business skills. As with the other programs in textile 



174 School Of Textiles 

technology, the student has further choice within the management program 
depending on his desire to follow micro, macro, or quantitative economics. 

Textile chemistry is designed to give the student a fundamental educa- 
tion in chemistry with special emphasis on the application of this science to 
textiles. 

The textile chemistry curriculum places emphasis on chemical funda- 
mentals so that those students who complete this program with a high 
degree of excellence are adequately prepared for graduate study either in 
pure or applied chemistry. Similarly, students who complete the program 
in any one of the stems in textile technology with a high degree of 
excellence would be acceptable for graduate study in many different areas. 

Inasmuch as the professional work in textiles is concentrated to a great 
extent in the last two years in the student's program, it is quite possible 
for students from either junior colleges or other institutions of higher 
learning to transfer to the School of Textiles with a minimum loss of time. 

Degrees — Upon completion of programs in textile technology, the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in textile technology is conferred. Upon comple- 
tion of the program in textile chemistry, the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in textile chemistry is conferred. 

The degree of Master of Science in textile technology or of Master of 
Science in textile chemistry is offered for the satisfactory completion of a 
minimum of one year of graduate study in residence. Candidates for the 
degree of Master of Science enter and are enrolled in the Graduate School 
of the college. For general requirements, consult the Graduate School 
Catalog. 

Facilities — The Textile Building, erected in 1939 and greatly enlarged in 
1950, was designed to coordinate teaching and laboratory facilities. It 
houses one of the most modern and best-equipped textile institutions in the 
world. 

Opportunities — Technological advances in textile fibers and manufactur- 
ing techniques have created a tremendous demand for men technically 
trained in textile colleges. For the past several years, the School of Textiles 
has had a demand for graduates greater than it could supply. Its graduates 
have entered the textile industry at salaries equal to or better than those 
offered in many other industries. 

Graduates of the school are equipped to enter many fields related to 
textiles, such as manufacturing, sales or research; and alumni of the school 
hold responsible positions in each of these fields. Many are now mill presi- 
dents or general managers. 

Some of the specific fields are production of yarns, production of woven 
and knitted fabrics, dyeing and finishing, industrial engineering, quality 
control, designing, styling, merchandising, coverting, research, cost and 
production control, sales of equipment and materials to the textile industry. 

To assist in the placement of students and alumni and to facilitate inter- 
views by textile firms, the school maintains a full-time placement director. 

Inspection trips — For certain of the textile courses offered, it is deemed 
advantageous for the student to see the manufacturing process under actual 
operating conditions. When possible, trips are arranged for student groups 
to visit outstanding manufacturing plants. Participation in the trips is re- 
quired; transportation costs and other travel expenses, while held to a 
minimum insofar as possible, must be paid by the student. 

Short Courses — It is the policy of the school to offer short course train- 
ing for textile mill men who have a limited amount of time to spend at the 



School Of Textiles .175 

school. These courses are offered when a sufficient demand for them develops. 
The subject matter is selected to meet the needs of the group. 

Extension Courses — The staff of the school cooperates with the Exten- 
sion Division of the college in offering textile courses by correspondence 
(for members of the textile industry) who wish to engage in this type of 
study. Applications for enrollment in these courses should be mailed direct 
to Director, College Extension Division, State College Station, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 



TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY 



Professor Elliot B. Grover, Head of the Department and Textile Research 
Professors J. F. Bogdan, Director, Processing Research, D. S. Hamby, B. L. 

Whittier 
Associate Professors W. E. Moser, J. E. Pardue, J. A. Porter 
Assistant Professors E. B. Berry, J. W. Klibbe, W. E. Smith, W. C. 

Stuckey, Jr., R. E. Wiggins 
Instructors Ruth B. Guin, James A. King, L. T. Lassiter 

Objectives — The purpose of this department is to instruct students in 
the theory and fundamental concepts, at both the basic and advanced levels, 
of fiber properties and fiber processing through yarns and fabrics. This is 
accomplished through the systematic study of the engineering properties of 
both the materials being processed and of the equipment involved in manu- 
facturing. 

Curriculum — The curriculum in textile technology involves a basic edu- 
cation for the first two years in the physical sciences, humanities, and social 
sciences. After the student has completed this phase of his education, he 
is then taught the application of the fundamental sciences to the areas of 
textile technology. 

The textile technology curriculum represents a new approach to textile 
education. It is directed towards a common first year within the school 
with standardized basic requirements in physical sciences. The major por- 
tion of course work in textile technology is deferred to the junior and 
senior years in order to provide the best possible background for students 
before entering the major field. The semester credit hours required for 
graduation have been reduced and at the same time the student has been 
given a much wider selection of courses in the areas of mathematics, engi- 
neering, physics, statistics, economics, and social sciences. 

The primary objective of the textile technology curriculum is to provide 
as general an education as possible and at the same time to prepare the 
graduate for profitable employment in the textile industry. This is accom- 
plished through an integration of physical sciences and the application of 
the sciences and economics to the field of textiles. 

In addition to the wide selection of basic sciences, the student also has 
the opportunity for diversification within the School of Textiles. The cur- 
riculum offers depth in such selected areas as fiber and yarn technology, 
fabric technology, knitting technology, general textiles, and textile man- 
agement. 

Graduate Studies — The Department of Textile Technology offers a grad- 
uate program leading to a degree of Master of Science in textile tech- 
nology. This program is designed for students interested in advanced study 
directed toward individual research and investigations, and is so developed 



176 School Of Textiles 

that students may major in the field of textile technology and minor in 
approved areas such as statistics, industrial engineering, and textile quality 
control. A limited number of fellowships and scholarships are available to 
students who qualify. 

Facilities — The facilities of this department are subdivided into respec- 
tive areas for processing cotton and other short staple fibers; woolen, 
worsted and long staple synthetic fibers; continuous filament yarns; warp 
preparation and slashing; cam, dobby, and jacquard weaving; physical 
testing; and applied research laboratories. 

Cotton and Short Staple Synthetics — This area is complete in respect to 
the most modern of opening, picking, carding, combing, drawing, roving, 
spinning, winding, and twisting equipment. The laboratory facilities are 
kept up-to-date, which enables the school to maintain one of the most com- 
plete and modern facilities of this type in the world. 

Woolen, Worsted, and Long-Staple Synthetic Fibers — A new laboratory 
has been set up for the processing of wool and long-staple synthetic fibers 
and blends. Included in the equipment is a Davis and Furber Wool Unit, 
complete from machinery to handle blending through spinning. Another set 
of machinery in this laboratory is designed to process the longer staple 
natural and synthetic fibers on the American worsted and new fiber systems. 
Tow-to-top machines, rectilinear combs, intersecting gills, wide ratch rov- 
ing and spinning frames, and other supplemental equipment permit the 
processing of these fibers in many commercially oriented paths into spun 
yarns. 

Continuous Filament Yarns — The continuous filament laboratory has the 
complete range of equipment necessary for the processing of thrown yarn 
and includes: soaking tub, extractor, dryer, twist-setting oven, spooler, up- 
stroke twisters, double twister, quill winder, cone winders, and nylon 
sizing machine, plus supplementary equipment such as a texturizing 
machine. 

Warp Preparation and Slashing — The equipment for preparing yarn for 
weaving includes a modern high speed warper, rayon-type slasher, and a 
small scale experimental slasher, as well as auxiliary equipment. There is 
also a silk-type combination warper and beamer used for making short 
warps for student instruction. There is a separate room for drawing in 
warps. 

Cam, Dobby, and Jacquard Weaving — The weaving facilities are sub- 
divided into three laboratories: cam, jacquard, and dobby weaving. On 
this equipment instruction is given in how to produce such fabrics as 
print cloths, denims, sateens, ginghams, fancy shirting, dobby weave dress 
and drapery materials, pile, leno and jacquard fabrics, woven from natural 
and synthetic fibers. All weave rooms are completely humidified. 

Physical Testing — There are three separate air-conditioned laboratories, 
two of which are used for teaching and undergraduate student work and 
another for industrial research and graduate student research. 

The laboratories contain all equipment for the physical testing of fibers, 
yarns and fabrics. Included in the equipment are a complete range of fiber 
testing equipment, three Instron Testers, several torsion and other types of 
balances, several combination skein and fabric breaking machines, inclined 
plane testers, single strand pendulum testers, Uster dynamometer, bursting 
strength testers, drying ovens, abrasion machines, twist testers, hydrostatic 
pressure tester, automatic reels, permeability testers, eight evenness testers, 
three Uster spectrographs, and many other types of laboratory equipment, 
including both commercial and special instruments developed at the school. 
In addition, the laboratory contains microscopes, cross sectioning devices 
and equipment for photomicrography. A dark-room containing the necessary 
equipment for photographic work is also available. 



School Of Textiles .177 

Applied Research Laboratories — Four separate laboratories for applied 
research in fiber processing and weaving are located in this department. 
These laboratories are completely equipped and designed for research by 
students and faculty in the areas of fiber processing, warp preparation and 
weaving. 



KNITTING TECHNOLOGY 



Professor William E. Shinn, Head of the Department and Director, Knit- 
ting Research 
Associate Professor J. G. Lewis 
Assistant Professor H. M. Middleton, Jr. 

Objectives — In recognition of the great importance of knitting and the 
other needle arts in the industrial life of this section, a Department of 
Knitting has been set up with the objective of making available to this 
branch of the textile industry personnel trained in the fundamentals and 
practices underlying the production of knitted textiles. 

Facilities — The laboratories of the Knitting Technology Department, or- 
ganized and equipped for instruction in many phases of the knit-goods in- 
dustry, are grouped as follows: 

Seamless Hosiery — Equipment for instruction in seamless hosiery pro- 
duction includes representative types of machines arranged in two groups. 
The more elementary types, including ribbers and plain hosiery machines 
with the elementary attachments such as stripers, reverse plating and 
rubber top attachments, are arranged together for beginning students. The 
more advanced types are grouped together for advanced students. This line 
includes advanced rib type machines, Komets, Banner Wrap Reverse, several 
types of float stitch machines, and machines for the manufacture of hosiery 
with ornamental wrap patterns. 

Nylon Hosiery — This section is equipped with three full-fashioned hosiery 
knitting machines of modern types, in 45-gauge, 51-gauge, 54-gauge, and 
66-gauge. There is provided also three 400-needle women's nylon hosiery 
machines of the circular type. This equipment forms the basis for instruc- 
tion in the general course in hosiery manufacture and for the more ad- 
vanced instruction in full fashioned hosiery production. Equipment for the 
looping and seaming of hosiery, for pre-boarding, dyeing and finishing of 
fine hosiery is provided in separate rooms. 

Circular Knitwear — A wide assortment of large diameter fabric knitting 
machines is provided for demonstration and instruction in the production of 
cloth for both underwear and outerwear. This group includes latch needle 
and spring needle types for jersey, rib, interlock and Jacquard fabric. 

Garment Cutting and Seaming — A laboratory for experimental garment 
design and manufacture has been set up with modern power cutting equip- 
ment and many types of industrial sewing machines for producing gar- 
ments for both outerwear and underwear. This unit is supplemented by 
knit goods finishing equipment located in the hosiery and knitwear finish- 
ing laboratory. 

Warp Knitting, Flat Knitting — The knitting department laboratories in- 
clude eight warp knitting machines of the tricot and raschel types. These 
machines furnish the basis for instruction in the design analysis, and pro- 
duction of warp knitted fabrics. A collection of fabrics and several winding 
and warp preparation machines make it possible to process a variety of 



178 School Of Textiles 

materials. Flat machines of the V-bed and links-and-links type are em- 
ployed for instruction in the production of heavier knitwear such as 
sweaters. 

Knit Goods Finishing — Devoted entirely to experimental work in hosiery 
and knit goods finishing, this laboratory contains modern equipment for 
pre-boarding, dyeing and finishing machinery, a knit goods calendar for 
finishing knitted tubing, and a fabric brush. 



TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 



Professor Henry A. Rutherford, Head of the Department and Director, 
Chemical Research 

Professor K. S. Campbell 

Associate Professors A. C. Hayes, D. M. Cates, Associate Director, Chemi- 
cal Research 



Objectives — The purpose of this department is to instruct students in 
the chemistry of natural and synthetic fibers, and in the theory and prac- 
tice of scouring, bleaching, dyeing, finishing and printing of yarns and 
fabrics; to conduct laboratory experimental work demonstrating the prin- 
ciples set forth in lecture periods; to cooperate with the mills of the state 
in solving problems relating to the wet processing of textile materials. 

Curriculum — The curriculum in the Textile Chemistry Department is 
listed with the other textile curricula. Changes in the requirements for stu- 
dents selecting this curriculum may be anticipated from time to time in or- 
der that the academic training may be kept abreast of modern developments 
in the application of chemistry to textile materials. 

Graduate Studies — A Master's degree in textile chemistry is offered for 
the satisfactory completion of one year of graduate study in residence. The 
program in textile chemistry and its related area, polymer science, is in- 
tended to provide professional training at the graduate level. The student 
with a Bachelor's degree in chemistry or chemical engineering will gen- 
erally have the academic background to undertake it. The student with a 
major in physics may desire to enroll in one or two undergraduate courses 
in chemistry to erase certain deficiencies. 

Six courses, that are described elsewhere, (TC 403, 404; TC 511; TC 512; 
TC 605; and TC 606), are the core of the educational plan at the graduate 
level. The selection of courses beyond the ones mentioned depends on the 
student's interest and the nature of his thesis research. The objective is to 
stimulate basic research and to train scientists in the general field of fiber 
and polymer chemistry, with proper emphasis on the supporting sciences. 
Although fiber-forming polymers are emphasized, the program is broad in 
scope, providing an opportunity for training and research in general prin- 
ciples in the polymer field, as well as advanced study in chemistry, physics, 
and mathematics. 

Fellowships and assistantships are available for qualified students. 

Facilities — Facilities available in textile chemistry are as follows: 

Dyeing Laboratory — This is a complete laboratory with generous pro- 
vision for bench space, equipment storage facilities, utilities and steam 
baths. It is used for all laboratory work dealing with chemical properties 
of textiles, dye synthesis, color matching and all types of dyeing. 



School Of Textiles 179 

Dye House — In this room is assembled a collection of dyeing and finish- 
ing machinery for instructional and experimental purposes. Obtained over 
the last few years, the equipment includes a singeing machine, a continuous 
dyeing range of the pad-steam type, a Williams unit, a du Pont-type con- 
tinuous bleaching unit, four package dyeing machines, a dye beck, dye jig, 
rotary hosiery dyeing machine, piece goods dyeing and finishing units 
utilizing dry cans, enclosed tenter frame and a continuous loop drying and 
curing unit supplied with both steam and gas-fired heat sources, and a 
laboratory calendar. 

Research and Textile Chemical Analysis — Two laboratories equipped for 
chemical research on fibers and on textile chemical specialties are available 
for use by advanced undergraduate students working on special problems 
and for research. Equipment includes a reflectometer, a spectrophotometer 
with all supplementary apparatus, colorimeters and the common testing 
equipment used for evaluation and for determining color-fastness, wash- 
fastness, etc., of dyed fibers and fabrics. 



TEXTILE RESEARCH 

The school is actively engaged in a program of basic and applied re- 
search, both state-supported and sponsored, carried on primarily in the 
educational departments concerned. In textile chemistry, the overall direc- 
tion is under Professor Henry A. Rutherford, head of the department. Dr. 
David Cates is the assistant director of chemical research, handling primar- 
ily basic areas, and W. R. Martin, Jr., heads the sponsored and applied 
areas. In the Department of Textile Technology, which encompasses all the 
areas outside those involved in chemistry and knitting, the overall direction 
is under Professor E. B. Grover, head of the department, with Professor 
John F. Bogdan being in direct charge of all sponsored programs. Research 
in knitting technology is under the direction of Professor W. E. Shinn, head 
of the Department of Knitting Technology. 



MACHINE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT 

C. M. Asbill, Jr., Head of Department 

Objectives — The purposes of the department are to develop new types 
of textile machinery and to improve existing types; to keep abreast of 
modern developments in machines and testing equipment by a digest of 
patents and technical articles in the various textile publications, as well as 
by close contacts with mills and machine manufactures. 

And to furnish engineering assistance and advice relating to patents to 
individuals and organizations interested in the design or development of 
textile machines or related apparatus. 

Also to place within reach of and at the disposal of interested students 
and the teaching and research staff of the School of Textiles, the facilities 
of a qualified textile engineering department with means for the construc- 
tion and testing of new and improved equipment. 

Facilities — The facilities consist of design and drafting equipment to- 
gether with a completely equipped machine shop for the production of 
both large production machines and smaller and more delicate testing 
apparatus. 



180 School Of Textiles 

The establishment of this department within the School of Textiles was 
made possible by the financial assistance of the North Carolina Textile 
Foundation. Its functions extend to all phases of textile manufacturing and 
processing, including both the mechanical and electrical fields. 



TEXTILE LIBRARY 

Mrs. Adriana P. Orr, Librarian 

As a result of a substantial gift by the Burlington Mills Corporation, 
the Textile Library was relocated in the Textile Building in 1951. The 
new, enlarged quarters were designed to incorporate the latest functional 
improvements. 

The library was organized in 1944. In 1945 the entire textile collection 
from the D. H. Hill Library was added to it. There are now about 9,000 
volumes of which 2,500 are bound periodicals. The library subscribes to 
150 current periodicals, both American and foreign, which are thoroughly 
indexed in Industrial Arts Index, Chemical Abstracts, Natural and Syn- 
thetic Fibers, and Textile Technology Digest. 

In addition to books and periodicals, the librarian and student assistants 
maintain files of pamphlets, reprints, trade catalogs, and patents. Special 
card indexes have been prepared for these collections. 

The holdings of the Textile Library are available on loan not only to 
students and faculty of the college but also to research workers and 
industry employees throughout North Carolina. 



TEXTILE PLACEMENT BUREAU 

Professor George H. Dunlap, Director 

The Placement Bureau is a clearing house for students in the graduating 
class and for textile alumni. It is a coordinating agency for the employer 
and the graduates of the School of Textiles. The Placement Bureau tries 
to keep an accurate file of all textile alumni and the progress they have 
made. Therefore, all alumni are requested to notify the director when they 
receive a promotion or transfer from one organization to another. 

SPONSORED PROFESSORSHIPS 

The School of Textiles has four sponsored professorships. These are 
made possible by funds contributed to the North Carolina Textile Foun- 
rations, Inc., and especially designated to pay a part of the annual salary 
of the professor selected to fill the position. 

The four professorships, together with the year of establishment and 
the name of the incumbent for each, are as follows: 

Burlington Industries Professorship of Textiles 1946, Dame S. Hamby, 
professor of textiles, Department of Textile Technology. 



School Of Textiles 



181 



Edgar and Emily Hesslein Professorship of Fabric Development 1948, 
Benjamin Lincoln Whittier, professor of textiles, Department of Textile 
Technology. 

Chester H. Roth Professorship of Knitting Technology 1948, William 
Edward Shinn, professor of textiles and head of Department of Knitting 
Technology. 

Abel C. Lineberger Professorship of Yarn Manufacturing 1948, Elliot 
Brown Grover, professor of textiles and head of Department of Textile 
Technology. 



TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



Fiber and Yarn Technology, Fabric Technology, General Textiles, and Knitting Technology 
Options. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 


Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


CH 101, Chemistry 


4 


CH 103, Chemistry 


4 


•MA 101, Mathematics 


5 


•MA 102, Mathematics 


4 


ME 101, Engineering Graphic 


2 


ENG 112, English 


3 


ENG 111, English 


3 


PS 201, American Government 


3 


TX 181, Introduction to Tex. 


1 


••Military Science 




♦•Military Science 




or 




or 




••Air Science 


1 


••Air Science 


1 


•*PE 102, Physical Education 


1 


•*PE 101, Physical Education 


1 




— 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 
PY 201, Physics 

and 
MA 201, Calculus 

or 
PY 211, Physics 

and 
•♦••Electives for Schedule A. 
••♦English 

HI 252, U. S. History 
TX 283, Fundamentals of Textiles 
••Military Science 

or 
••Air Science 
♦♦PE 201, Physical Education 



lf> 



Credits 


Spring Semester 




Credits 


5 

4 


PY 202, Physics 

and 
MA 202, Calculus 




5 
4 


4 

3 
3 
3 

2 


PY 212, Physics 

and 
Electives from Schedule A 
TX 281, Fiber Quality 
TX 261, Fabric Structure 
••Military Science 


4 

7 
3 
3 


1 
1 


**Air Science 
**PE 202, Physical 


Education 


1 
1 



19 
or 
17 



Fall Semester 

•••English 

ST 361, Statistics 

TX 303, Fiber and Yarn Tech. 

TC 201, Textile Chemistry I 

TX 365, Fabric Technology 

TX 342, Knitting Principles 



JUNIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


8 
3 

4 
2 

4 
2 


Humanities or Economics 
TX 327, Textile Testing 
Free Electives 
Stem Hours 


3 
4 
3 

8 




18 



18 



182 



School Of Textiles 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Humanities 

TX 581, Instrumentation 

TC 307, Textile Chemistry 

TX 442, Knitted Fabrics 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours 



Credits 
3 
8 

4 
3 
3 



19 



Spring Semester 
Social Sciences 
TX 485, Mill Design 
Free Electives 
Stem Hours 



& Organiz. 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
6 

17 



Credits required — freshman year, 33 ; sophomore year, 
36 ; total hours, 141. 



junior year, 36 ; senior year. 



* Students below a selected-cut off point in placement tests in mathematics will take 

Mathematics, MA 111, 112 and one more hour of free electives. In addition, they must 

take either Stem 3 or 4. 

** Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physical Education will schedule 

equivalent credits in courses from the following departments: economics, English, history 

and political science, modern languages, philosophy and religion, psychology, rural sociology, 

social studies, or sociology. 

*** If approved in advance, students who average C or above on Composition, Eng. Ill, 

112, may substitute 6 credits of modern language. 

**** Students selecting this sequence of courses must re-schedule hours in second semester 

of sophomore and junior year. 

Fiber and Yarn Technology, Fabric Technology, General Textiles, and 
Knitting Technology Options. 

ADDITIONAL STEM REQUIREMENTS 



Stem 1 and 2 require the MA 201, 202 
sequence. 







Credits 


1. Fiber and Yarn Tech. 
TX 304, Fiber & Yarn Tech. 
TX 436, Staple Fiber Process. 
TX 430, Cont. Filament Yarns 

and either 
TX 366, Fabric Technology 

and 
TX 483, Textile Cost Methods 




4 
3 
3 

4 

2 


Selection from Schedule B 6, 


7, 


or 8» 


16 


(to 


18) 



2. Fabric Technology 
TX 366, Fabric Technology 
TX 575, Fabric Analytics and 

Characteristics 
TX 478, Design and Weaving 

and either 
TX 304, Fiber and Yarn Tech. 

and 
TX 483, Textile Cost Methods 



Credits 
4 

3 
3 

4 

2 



Selection from Schedule B 6, 7, or 8* 



16 (to 18) 



Stems 3 and 4 do not require MA 201, 
202 sequence. 



3. General Textiles 
TX 304, Fiber & Yarn Tech. 
TX 366, Fabric Technology 
TX 483, Textile Cost Methods 
Electives from Schedule C 



Credits 

4 
4 
2 
6 

16 



Credits 



4. **Knitting Technology 
TX 483, Textile Cost Methods 
TX 430, Continuous Filament 

Yarns 
TX 441, Flat Knitting 
TX 444, Garment Manufacture 
TX 447, 448, Advanced Knitting Lab 
Transfer to Free Electives 



3 
4 

1 

16 



* Any hours above the six allocated may be taken from free electives. 
** Either Mathematics-Physics sequence is acceptable. 



SCHEDULE A 



Schedule A is comprised of two or three-course sequences totaling in each 
case a minimum of eight semester hours. The sequence elected by the 
student must meet with the approval of his adviser. Illustrative of the 
sequences would be studies in the areas of industrial engineering, industrial 
psychology, economics, or other approved fields of study. Any differences in 
hours between the minimum of eight which are required and the 10 allo- 
cated may be transferred to free electives. 



School Of Textiles 



183 



SCHEDULE B 

Schedule B is comprised of two-course sequences totaling in each case a 
minimum of six credit hours. The sequence elected by the student must 
meet with the approval of his adviser. Illustrative of the sequences would 
be studies in the areas of mechanics and strength of materials, advanced 
statistics, advanced physics, industrial engineering, textile quality control, 
and other approved courses of the 300 level or above in the physical or 
applied science field. 

SCHEDULE C 

Schedule C is comprised of two-course sequences in the field of textiles 
totaling in each case a minimum of six credit hours. Illustrative of the 
sequences available are the following: 



Credits 



TX 436, Staple Fiber Processing 

and 
TX 430, Continuous Filament Yarns 
TX 475, Fabric Analytics and 

Characteristics 

and 
TX 478, Design and Weaving 
TX 621, Textile Testing II 

and 
TX 522, Textile Quality control 



TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 
MANAGEMENT OPTION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fail Semester 

CH 101, Chemistry 

•MA 101, Mathematics 

ME 101, Engineering Graphics 

ENG 111, English 

TX 181, Introduction to Textiles 

••Military Science 

or 
••Air Science 
PE 101 Physical Education 



Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 
6 
2 
S 

1 


CH 103, Chemistry 

•MA 102, Mathematics 

ENG 112, English 

PS 201, American Government 

Military Science 


4 
4 
8 
3 


1 
1 


••Air Science 

PE 102, Physical Education 


1 
1 



17 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fail Semester 

PY 211, Physics 

MA 201, Mathematics 

or 
MA 211, Mathematics 
HI 252, U. S. History 
TX 283, Fundamentals of Tex. 
EC 201. Economics 
••Military Science 

or 
••Air Science 
••PE 201, Physical Education 



Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


A 


PY 212, Physics 

MA 202, Mathematics 


4 


4 
8 
2 
8 


or 
MA 212, Mathematics 
TX 281, Fiber Quality 
TX 261, Fabric Structure 
EC 301, Economics 
••Military Science 


4 
% 
3 
3 


1 

1 


••Air Science 

••PE 202, Physical Education 


1 
1 



18 



19 



184 



School Op Textiles 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ST 361, Statistics 

TX 303, Fiber and Yarn Techn. 

TC 201, Textile Chemistry I 

EC 302, Economics 

Stem Hours 



Credits 
8 
4 
2 
3 
6 

18 



Spring Semester 

•** English 

TX 3C5, Fabric Technology 

TX 327, Textile Testing 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours 



Credits 
p 

4 
4 
3 
3 

17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

•••English 

TC 307, Textile Chemistry II 

TX 342, Knitting Principles 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours 



Credits 
3 
4 
2 
3 
6 

18 



Spring Semester 

TX 485, Mill Design and Organ. 

EC 490, Senior Seminar in Econ. 

Free Electives 

Stem Hours 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
6 

18 



Credits required — freshman year, 33 ; sophomore year, 37 ; junior year, 35 ; senior year, 36 ; 
total 14L 



• Students below a selected cut-off point in placement tests in Mathemaics will take 

Mathematics, MA 111, 112 and one more hour of free electives. 

•• Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physical Education will schedule 

equivalent credits in courses from the following departments: Economics, English, History 

and Political Science, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Religion, Psychology, Rural 

Sociology, Social Studies, or Sociology. 

•** If approved in advance, students who average C or above on Composition, English 

111, 112, may substitute 6 credits of Modern Language. 



ADDITIONAL STEM REQUIREMENTS 



5. Micro-Economics 



Credits 



EC 312, Accounting for Eng. 
EC 410, Industry Studies 

or 
EC 413, Competition, Monoply 

and Public Policy 
Two courses from the following in 
economics: EC 310, EC 410, or EC 
413, EC 440, EC 446, and EC 448 
Selection from Schedule D 



21 



6. Macro-Economics 

EC 312, Accounting for Eng. 
EC 440, Economics of Growth 
EC 444, Economic Systems 
EC 448, International Economics 
Selections from Schedule D 



7. Applied Economics 

EC 312, Accounting for Eng. 
EC 410, Industry Studies 

or 
EC 450, Economic Decision 

Processes 
EC 552, Econometrics 
•MA 405, Introduction to 
Determinants & Matrices 
Selections from Schedule D 



Credits 
3 
3 



21 



Credits 
3 



21 



• Note that MA 202 is a prerequisite for MA 405. Therefore, students taking Stem #7 
must take MA 201, 202 rather than MA 211, 212. 



SCHEDULE D 



Schedule D is comprised of a three-course sequence from one of the 
following fields totaling in each case a minimum of nine credit hours: 
English, foreign languages, history, political science, sociology, psychology, 
natural science, and physical science. 



School Of Textiles 



185 



TEXTILE CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

TX 181. Introduction to Tex. 

ENG 111, English 

CH 102, Chemistry 

MA 101, Mathematics 

ME 101, Engineering Graphics 

♦Military Science 

or 
*Air Science 
*PE 101, Physical Education 



Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credit* 


1 

S 

4 
6 
2 


ENG 112, English 

CH 104, Chemistry 

MA 102, Mathematics 

TX 283, Fundamentals of Tex. 

PS 201, American Government 

♦Military Science 


8 

4 
4 
2 
8 


1 
1 


*Air Science 

*PE 102, Physical Education 


1 
1 



17 



18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MA 211, Calculus 

PY 211. Physics 

CH 211, Quantative Analysis 

TX 261, Fabric Structure and 

Design 
♦Military Science 

or 
♦Air Science 
♦PE 201, Physical Education 



Credits 
8 

4 
4 

3 



Spring Semester 

MA 212, Calculus 

PY 212, Physics 

HI 252, U. S. History 

CH 212, Quantative Analysis 

TX 281, Fiber Quality 

♦Military Science 

or 
*Air Science 
♦PE 202, Physical Education 



Credits 



16 



19 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
♦♦English Elective 
Humanities or Economics 
CH 421, Organic Chemistry 
TX 327, Textile Testing 
TC 303, Textile Chemistry ni 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
4 



18 



Spring Semester 
♦♦English Elective 

or 
Humanities or Economics 
CH 422, Organic Chemistry 
TC 304, Textile Chemistry III 
Electives 



Credits 
8 



17 



Fall Semester 

TX 581, Instrumentation 
TC 403, Texitle Chem. Tech. 
TC 511, Chemistry of Fibers 
CH 341, Physical Chemistry 

or 
CH 531, Physical Chemistry 
CH 531L, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 
Electives 



Credits required— freshman year, 
36; total 141. 



SENIOR 


YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


8 
S 

8 


Humanities or Social Science 
TC 404, Tex. Chem. Tech. 
CH 342, Physical Chemistry 


3 
5 


8 
1 


CH 532, Physical Chemistry 
CH 532L, Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory 
Electvies 


3 

1 
6 



18 



18 



35; sophomore year, 35; junior year, 35; senior year. 



♦ Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physical Education will schedule 
equivalent credits in courses from the following departments: Economics, English, History 
and Political Science, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Religion, Psychology, Rural 
Sociology, Social Studies, or Sociology. 

♦♦ If approved in advance, students who average C or above on Composition, English 111, 
112 may substitute 6 credits of Modern Language. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Donald B. Anderson, Vice-President, Graduate Studies and Research, Chapel Hill 
Walter J. Peterson, Dean, Raleigh 



The Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Carolina 
is composed of three divisions, one at each of the three institutions of the 
University. Each unit is administered by a Graduate Dean and an 
Administrative Board representing the various degree-granting areas in 
each institution. The Vice-President for Graduate Studies and Research is 
the administrative officer of the Consolidated University who has respon- 
sibility for the development of policy in all graduate programs and for 
the coordination of the activities of the graduate schools at each of the 
three units of the University System. 

At State College, graduate instruction is offered in fields in agricul- 
ture, engineering, forestry, education, and textiles. The degree of Master 
of Science is offered in each of these areas. The Professional Master's 
degree also offered in some of these fields is intended for students 
who are interested in the more advanced applications of fundamental prin- 
ciples to specialized fields rather than in the acquisition of the broader back- 
ground in advanced scientific studies which would fit them for careers in 
research. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the following fields of 
study: agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal industry, 
botany (in the fields of psysiology and ecology), ceramic engineering, chem- 
ical engnieering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, engineering 
physics, entomology, experimental statistics, field crops, forestry, genetics, 
mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, plant pathology, rural soci- 
ology, soils, and zoology (in the fields of ecology and wildlife management). 

Students interested in graduate study should consult the Graduate School 
Catalog. A copy will be sent upon request. Inquiries should be addressed to : 

Dean 

Graduate School 

North Carolina State College 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



COLLEGE EXTENSION DIVISION 

Edward W. Ruggles, Director 



Objectives — The College Extension Division is organized to carry the 
practical and cultural advantages of college studies to persons who cannot 
attend classes on the campus and to groups and communities which may 
profit by the services offered. 



Extension Division 187 

Services — Extension courses are organized where at least 15 persons are 
interested and are willing to take up the same subject. In setting up the 
courses, such matters as distance from the college, nature of the subject, 
and availability of instructors must be taken into consideration. 

Correspondence courses for college credit are offered in agriculture, 
architecture, economics, education, engineering, English, geology, history, 
political science, mathematics, modern languages, psychology, rural soci- 
ology, sociology, statistics, and textiles. This listing of more than 75 courses 
continues to grow. 

The Correspondence Bureau also has set up a program of four high 
school courses — English review, review of elementary algebra, solid geo- 
metry, and plane geometry. The purpose of these non-credit courses is to 
give high school graduates an opportunity to fulfill the college entrance 
requirements and also to assist those who make low scores on their en- 
trance examinations. 

Another course, building and estimating, is offered through the Cor- 
respondence Bureau but does not carry college credit. It is designed to 
stress practical application of the subject matter. 

Other correspondence courses may be taken for professional credit rather 
than college credit. 

The Night Class Program is another Extension Division service. Each 
fall and each spring, a series of credit, hobby and vocational classes is 
presented on the college campus for residents of the Raleigh area. Similar 
courses also are taken to various communities where the demand is suffi- 
ciently great and others are conducted at military bases in the state. 

The Extension Division conducts a series of night classes in sub-freshman 
mathematics on the college campus. 

A wide variety of short courses and conferences is planned each year by 
the Extension Division in cooperation with several schools at State College. 

Some of these specialized courses, increasing in popularity, include those 
for electrical meter engineers, veterinarians, surveyors, apple and peach 
growers, sawmill operators, seedsmen, pest control operators, clay plant 
operators, gas plant operators, dry kiln operators, nurserymen, freezer 
plant operators, cemetery superintendents, artificial breeders, farm man- 
agers, and many others. 

Among the other courses offered annually are those of the beef cattle 
conference, dairymen's conference, statistical quality control, furniture 
finishing, grain marketing, farm and small business income tax, sport fish- 
ing, water works school, industrial waste conference, swine conference, per- 
sonnel testing institute, industrial management, industrial safety, motion 
and time study, job evaluation, introduction to quality control, industrial 
relations, pesticide school, cotton classing, lumber grading, parks and recrea- 
tion workship, aerial photo interpretation, commercial flower growers, linear 
programming, warm air heating and air conditioning, beef production, state 
garden schools. 

Other programs offered are dairy production, dairy manufacturing, field 
crops production, dairy herd testing, nutrition school, advertising, oil burner 
schools, retail building supply marketing institute, textile conferences, qual- 
ity concrete conference, poultry processors, personnel testing institute — in- 
troductory and advanced interviewing and counseling, management psychol- 
ogy and personnel research, N. C. press mechanical conference, short courses 
in modern farming, industry research conference, brick and tile institute, 
safety school, nuclear engineering courses, and scores of others to benefit 
trade and professional groups. 



188 Military Training 

The Gaston Technical Institute is conducted by the Extension Division as 
a division of the College's School of Engineering. Gaston Tech, located in 
Gastonia, offers four two-year technical training courses in electrical, civil, 
electronics, and mechanical-production technology. A separate catalog on 
the school and its curricula is available upon request. 

The North Carolina Truck Driver Training School conducts 12 four-week 
training courses for professional truck drivers each year. These schools are 
sponsored by the N. C. Motor Carriers Association. A bulletin giving com- 
plete details and application forms is available. 

For additional information, persons interested in extension classes, cor- 
respondence courses, or any of the other programs sponsored by the Ex- 
tension Division should write: 

Mr. Edward W. Ruggles 
Division of College Extension 
North Carolina State College 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



MILITARY TRAINING 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 



Professor of Military Science Colonel L. W. Merriam 

Assistant Professors of Military Science Lieutenant Colonel Donald J. Mc- 
Gurk, Lieutenant Colonel John K. Roberts, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel Wil- 
ford L. Willey, Major James F. Barrett, Major Joseph W. Jenkins, 
Major Edwin M. Reid, Major Oliver M. Smith, Captain Max A. Craig, 
Captain Norman G. Eriksen, Captain Charles L. McLain 



DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 



Professor of Air Science Colonel Robert C. Paul 

Assistant Professors of Air Science Major Emmett H. Miller, Jr., Major 
Tommy Cobb, Major Maynard C. Cusworth, Major Earl R. Dickey, 
Captain William S. Clarke, Jr., Captain Kendall G. Lorch, Captain 
Claude R. Rowell, Captain Charles W. Rowan, Captain Gerald L. 
Waterman 



Objectives — The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at State Col- 
lege designates those students enrolled for training in the Department of 
Military Science or in the Department of Air Science. These departments 
are integral academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. 
The senior Army officer and the senior Air Force officer assigned to the 
college are designated as professors of military science (PMS) and profes- 
sor of air science (PAS). These senior officers are responsible to the Secre- 
tary of the Army, the Secretary of the Air Force, and the chancellor of 
the college for conducting their training and academic program in accord- 
ance with instructions issued by the respective secretaries and as required 
by college regulations. Army officers who are assigned to the college as 



Military Training 189 

instructors in ROTC are designed as assistant professors of military sci- 
ence; Air Force officers, as assistant professors of Air Science. Non-com- 
missioned officers of the Army are assigned as assistant instructors and ad- 
ministrative personnel. Non-commissioned officers of the Air Force are 
assigned as administrative and supply personnel. 

The Army ROTC, in four years of military training, produces junior 
officers who have the qualities and attributes essential to their progressive 
and continued development as officers of the United States Army. 

The mission of the Air Force ROTC, as defined by the Department of 
the Air Force, is to select and prepare students, through a permanent pro- 
gram of instruction at civilian educational institutions, to serve as officers 
■n the regular and reserve components of the United States Air Force and 
to assist in discharging, where necessary, any institutional obligations to 
offer instruction in military training. 

Courses of Instruction — Programs of instruction for both Army and Air 
Force ROTC consist of a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced 
course. The satisfactory completion of the basic course in either the Army 
or Air Force ROTC is required for all physically fit male freshman and 
sophomores unless they are excused by the college administration. (AH 
veterans in active service as long as six months are excused from this re- 
quirement, but may enroll in the basic course of Army or Air Force to 
qualify for later enrollment in advanced courses.) 

The college provides, in co-operation with the Air Force and the Army, 
a flight instruction program. A limited number of highly qualified cadets 
from both ROTC units participate in this instruction, approximately 35 
hours of flying in light aircraft plus ground school. 

Successful completion of this phase of the ROTC course qualifies the 
cadet for a Federal Aviation Agency pilot's certificate. A detailed descrip- 
tion of all military courses is given under each of the departments in the 
section of the catalog which lists course descriptions. 

Military Science — The satisfactory completion of the first year of 
the Army ROTC course is a prerequisite for entering the second year. 
Enrollment in advanced courses is elective on the part of the student. 
The selection of advanced course students is made from applicants who are 
physically qualified and who have above average academic and military 
records. Veterans who have one year or more of service in the Armed 
Forces are eligible for enrollment in the Army ROTC advanced course 
upon reaching their junior year, provided they are in good academic stand- 
ing, physically qualified, have not reached their 27th birthday, and are 
selected by the PMS and the chancellor. 

The Army ROTC course includes instruction in American military his- 
tory, map reading, leadership, military teaching methods, military admin- 
istration, operations, and logistics. These subjects not only prepare students 
to be officers in the United States Army, but also awaken in them an 
appreciation of the obligations of citizenship and secure for them personal 
benefits resulting from practical application of organization and respon- 
sible leadership. An elective subject is chosen from general academic 
areas in effective communication, science comprehension, general psychol- 
ogy, or political development and political institutions for utilizing in the 
junior and senior years. 

Air Science — Enrollment in the Air Force ROTC advanced course is 
elective on the part of the student. Selection of advanced course students 
is made from applicants who are physically qualified and who have above 
average academic and military records. Qualified veterans desiring a com- 
mission through the AFROTC will be required to take that portion of the 
basic course, with their non-veterans contemporaries, which remains before 



190 Military Training 

they are classified as academic juniors. All veterans must have completed 
their academic and military requirements prior to their 28th birthday. 

The Air Force ROTC course of study includes instruction in foundations 
of air power, Air Force officer development, leadership, and air power 
concepts. The Air Force ROTC curriculum is designed to prepare the stu- 
dent for his obligations of citizenship to his country as an officer in the 
United States Air Force or as a civilian. 

Uniforms and Equipment — Officer-type uniforms for students enrolled in 
both basic and advanced courses in Army ROTC are provided by the 
Federal Government. Students enrolled in the basic course in Air Force 
ROTC are provided Air Force-type uniforms. For students enrolled in 
advanced courses in either Army or Air Force ROTC, the college is fur- 
nished a monetary allowance by the Federal Government for the purchase 
of uniforms. Army and Air Force equipment for instruction of students is 
provided by the Federal Government. Both uniforms and equipment are 
issued to the college, which is accountable for their care. 

Credit — Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC 
Unit established in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense 
Act and regulations governing the ROTC. Record of a student's prior 
training in the ROTC is obtained from the institution concerned. 

Financial Aid — Students enrolled in the advanced course are paid a 
monetary allowance in lieu of subsistence at the daily rate equal to the value 
of the commuted ration ($0.90) for a total period not to exceed 595 days 
during the two years of the course. Students in the basic course receive 
no monetary allowance. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE ROTC 



Army — The Army ROTC unit at State College consists of an Army bri- 
gade and a drum and bugle corps. The Army brigade, commanded by a 
cadet colonel and staff, consists of a provisional batallion and three battle 
groups. The cadet colonel and all other cadet officers are selected from 
students enrolled in the second year advanced course. Cadet first sergeants 
and sergeants first class are appointed from students enrolled in the first 
year advanced course. Certain specially selected students in the second year 
basic course also are appointed as cadet non-commissioned officers. Cadet 
officers and non-commissioned officers obtain invaluable experience in 
leadership by being responsible for conducting all drill instruction. They 
are observed and supervised in this by the officers and non-commissioned 
officers of the Army assigned to the college. 

Air Force — The Air Force ROTC unit consists of an Air Force wing and 
a drill team. The Air Force ROTC wing, commanded by a cadet colonel, 
consists of three groups which are composed of four squadrons each. These 
squadrons are divided into three flights per squadron, each flight consist- 
ing of three squads. The wing, group, squadron, and flight commander and 
their staff are cadet commissioned officers and are selected from cadets 
enrolled in the second year advanced course. All other positions are held 
by cadet non-commissioned officers who are selected from the first year 
advanced and second year basic cadets. Cadet officers and non-commissioned 
officers obtain invaluable experience in leadership by being responsible for 
planning and conducting all drill instruction. They are observed and super- 
vised by the officers and airmen assigned to the college. 

Distinguished Military Students — The college is authorized to designate 
outstanding students of the Army ROTC and AFROTC as distinguished 



Military Training 191 

military students. These students may, upon graduation, be designated dis- 
tinguished military graduates and may be selected for commissions in the 
regular Army and Air Force, provided they so desire. 

Selective Service in Relation to the ROTC— Enrollment in the ROTC does 
not in itself defer a student from induction and service under the Universal 
Military Training and Service Act. The law provides that "within such 
numbers as may be prescribed by the Secretary of Defense, any person 
who (a) has been or may hereafter be selected for enrollment or continu- 
ance in the senior division, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, or the Naval 
Reserve Officers Training Corps; (b) agrees, in writing, to accept a com- 
mission, if tendered, and to serve, subject to order of the secretary of the 
Military Department having jurisdiction over him; and (c) agrees to re- 
main a member of a regular or reserve component until the eighth anni- 
versary of the receipt of a commission in accordance with his obligation 
under subsection "d" of section four of this title, shall be deferred from 
induction under this title after completion or termination of the course of 
instruction and so long as he continues in a regular or reserve status upon 
being commissioned, but shall not be exempt from registration." 




STUDENTS find the library an ideal place for studying. 



The College 
Library 




D. H. HILL Library was named in memory of 
the late Dr. Daniel Harvey Hill, State College's 
third president. At present the library's book col- 
lection numbers more than 212,000 volumes plus 
numerous journals and documents. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

'Credits and 
Terms Offered 

AGC 212 ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 , ■ 

An introduction to the economic principles underlying agricultural production and market- 
ing; organization for production in agriculture; consumers and their influence upon the 
demand for agricultural products; relationships between agriculture and other segments of 
the economy; dynamic factors in the economy which affect agriculture. 

Staff 

AGC 303 ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT OF FARMS 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 .... 

This course is desgined to help students understand how basic economic principles and 
techniques of analysis can be applied in the successful operation of a farm business. Prac- 
tice in planning the organization and operation of a farm, including an economic evalua- 
tion of alternatives, is emphasized. Special attenton is given to problems of mechanization, 
leasing arrangements, credit financing, and labor management. Also, training in the use 
and analysis of farm records as an aid to better business management in planning adjust- 
ments is provided. 

Messers. Pierce and Hoover 

AGC 311 ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT OF MARKETING 

FIRMS 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A study of the agricultural marketing system and the current economic forces affecting 
its structure and efficiency; decision-making by agricultural business firms, with some dis- 
cussion of integration and inter-firm relationships; effects of monopoloy in marketing 
relative to government policies of control. Classroom discussion is supplemented by visits 
to marketing firms and by practical problems illustrating firm decisions. A laboratory period 
will be included in alternate weeks beginning with the second full week of classes. 

Staff 

AGC 322 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF COOPERATIVES 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A study of the principles of cooperation applied to farmers' purchasing, marketing, and 

service cooperatives; the role of cooperatives in our society, and problems associated with 

organization, operation, and management. 

(Offered in Spring 1962 and alternate years) Mr. King 

AGC 342 MARKETING FIELD CROPS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

The marketing of cotton, tobacco, and grain is studied by examining the management 
decisions made by the agricultural firms which deal in the marketing process of these 
major cash crops. Particular attention is given to the processes by which decisions are 
made, to the effects of demand and supply conditions upon marketing and to the nature 
of the various influences affecting the prices of these commodities. A laboratory period 
will be included in alternate weeks beginning with the second full week of classes. 

Staff 

AGC 352 MARKETING POULTRY PRODUCTS 3 (2-2) ■ 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A study of marketing principles with practical application related to poultry and poultry 
products; factors affecting prices and price variability in these products; the effects of 
changes in technology and institutional arrangements involved such as contract agreements; 
organization and efficiency of processing, assembling and distribution systems. A labora- 
tory period will be included in alternate weeks beginning with the second full week of 
classes. 

Mr. Stemberger 



*ln a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the number of actual lecture 
and laboratory hours of meeting per week, and the term or terms in which the course is 
offered are shown in this manner: 2(1-2) f s. The 2 indicates the number of semester 
hours credit given for satisfactory completion of the course. The (1-2) indicates that the 
course meets for one hour of lecture and for two hours of laboratory work each week. 
And the f s indicates that the course may be taken either during the fall or the spring 
semester. 



196 Agricultural Economics 

agc 362 marketing dairy products 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 ... ... 

Economic problems in marketing milk including management decisions concerning location, 
size, and nature of processing plants; organization of assembly and delivery routes; bar- 
gaining and pricing schemes; analysis of consumer demand and government regulation of 
milk and milk products. 
(Offered in fall 1962 and alternate years) Mr. Simmons 

AGC 364 MARKETING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 . . ■• ■ j 

Introduction to marketing with illustrations and particular application to friuts and vege- 
tables; buying and selling decisions faced by farmers; supply and demand characterstics 
of principal fruits and vegetables; the organization and business management of markets; 
methods of marketing; pricing and price discrimination; relation of the processing industry 
to firms marketing fresh products; the role of government in establishing grades and stand- 
ards, provision of inspection services and establishment of marketing orders and agree- 
ments. A laboratory period will be included in alternate weeks beginning with the second 
full week of classes. 

Mr. King 

AGC 372 MARKETING LIVESTOCK 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 . 

This course is concerned with the livestock marketing industry. It is a study of the busi- 
nesses which handle livestock and meats from their production to the consumer. These 
businesses include farmers, local auction market and buying station operations, meat pack- 
ers, and retail meat markets. Each type of business operation is studied with the idea of 
determining the major economic problems which it faces, the nature of these problems and 
the manner in which they may best be solved. A laboratory period will be included in alter- 
nate weeks beginning with the second full week of classes. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGC 413 FARM APPRAISAL AND FINANCE 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 

The principles of farm appraisal and practical methods used in determining the value of 

farms of various types and sizes; credit financing in agriculture, including (1) types, sources, 

and cost of credit, (2) repayment plans, and (3) methods of determining when and how 

credit can be used effectively by farmers; special problems associated with agricultural 

credit. 

Mr. Hoover 

AGC 431 AGRICULTURAL PRICE ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

This course involves an examination and analysis of agricultural price behavior as related 
to decision-making of economic units. Methods of agricultural price analysis, including con- 
struction and use of index numbers and measure of price movements, are studied. Essential 
elements of theory will be introduced to show how and why prices change so frequently 
and persistently. Emphasis is placed upon the interpretation of price information in relation 
to income, production and consumption of farm products. Special attention is given to 
marketing practices which influence price formation for agricultural products, including 
storage operations, time and space factors. 

Messrs. Pierce, Hoover 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGC 501 (EC 501) INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or equivalent 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and market behavior, including de- 
mand, costs and production, pricing under competitive conditions, and pricing under mono- 
poly, and other imperfectly competitive conditions. 

Staff 

AGC 512 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF FACTOR MARKETS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

This course is oriented to the relative significance of land, labor, and capital as factors of 
production in a modern agricultural economy, including major changes in the respective 
roles of these factors of production in recent years. An examination is made of the changes 
in characteristics of the supply and demand for these factors. The structure and efficiency 
of markets for these factors, including relevance of the institutional and attitudinal setting 
in each type of market and nature of the demand-supply equilibration will be investigated. 
Public policies as they affect efficiency of the factor markets and other goals relating to 
the use of the basic factors of production in agriculture also will be considered. 

Mr. Tolley 



Agricultural Economics 197 

agc 521 procurement, processing and distribution of 

agricultural products 3 (3-0) . 

Prerequisite: AGC 311 or equivalent 

A study of marketing firms as producers of marketing services and their role in the pricing 
process; the influence of government policies on the behavior of marketing firms; methods 
of increasing the efficiency of marketing agricultural products. 

Mr. King 

AGC 523 PLANNING FARM AND AREA ADJUSTMENTS 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 or equivalent 

The application of economic principles in the solution of production problems of typical 

farms in the state; methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm business; 

application of research findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural 

programs. 

Mr. Coutu 

AGC 533 AGRICULTURAL POLICY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AG 212 

A review of the agricultural policy and action programs of the Federal Government in their 
economic and political setting; analysis of objectives, principal means, and observable re- 
sults under short-term and long-term viewpoints, and under the criteria of resource use 
and income distribution within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the 
economy; appraisal of alternative policy proposals; the effects of commodity support pro- 
grams on domestic and foreign consumption; investigation of some of the international 
aspects of United States agricultural policy; attempts at world market regulations and 
the role of international organizations, agreements and programs. 

Staff 

AGC 551 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

An economic analysis of agricultural production, including production functions, cost func- 
tions, programming and decision-making principles; and the application of these principles 
to farm and regional resource allocation, and to the distribution of income to and within 
agriculture. 

Mr. Toussaint 

AGC 552 CONSUMPTION, DISTRIBUTION AND PRICES IN AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or equivalent 

Basis for family decisions concerning consumption of goods and services ond supply of pro- 
ductive factors; forces determining prices and incomes; interrelationships between economic 
decisions of the household and the firm. 

Mr. Henry 

AGC 561 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS 

IN AGRICULTURE Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing and consent of the instructor 
Analysis of economic problems of current interest in agriculture. Credit for this course will 
involve a scientific appraisal of a selected problem and alternative solutions. This course 
usually is reserved for seniors majoring in Agricultural Economics or graduate students in- 
terested in special problems suggested by the course outline of their academic program 



of the degree involved. 



Staff 



GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

AGC 602 MONETARY AND FISCAL POLICIES IN RELATION TO 

AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 501 or equivalent 

Aggregative theory relevant to monetary and fiscal policies; fundamentals of model build- 
ing; mathematical models involving income, employment, price levels, money supply, interest 
rates and other aggregative variables; main economic magnitudes for the United States 
economy; the structure of taxes and revenue; institutional determinants of monetary and 
fiscal operations in the United States; and the relation of monetary-fiscal policies to agri- 
cultural incomes and prices. 

Mr. Tolley 

AGC 612 INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN RELATION TO AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 602 

The principles of international and interregional trade: structures of trade relationships 
between countries engaged in the import or export of agricultural products; attempts at 
stablizing trade and financial transactions. 

Mr. Tolley 

AGC 621 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Maximum 6 f i 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Agricultural Economics and consent of Graduate Ad- 
visory Committee 
A consideration of research methods and procedures employed in the field of agricultural 
economics, including qualitative analysis, inductive and deductive methods of research, 
selection of projects, planning and execution of the research project. 

Staff 



198 Agricultural Engineering 

agc 631 economic and social foundations of agricultural 

POLICY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 501 or equivalent 

The study of logical and empirical problems of inquiry into public policies and programs 
that affect agriculture; analysis of policy-making processes, interdependencies among 
economic, political and social objectives and action; the study of forces which shape economic 
institutions and goals and of the logic, beliefs and values on which policies and programs 
that affect agriculture are founded. 

Mr. Lindsey 

AGC 632 WELFARE EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisite: AGC 642 

Description of the conditions defining optimal resource allocation; application of the con- 
ditions for maximum welfare in appraisal of economic policies and programs affecting 
resource allocation, income distribution and economic development of agriculture. 

Mr. Bishop 

AGC 641 ECONOMICS OF PRODUCTION, SUPPLY AND MARKET 

INTERDEPENDENCY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 501 or equivalent 

An advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer behavior and 
choice among combinations of factors and kinds and quantities of output; aggregative con- 
sequences of individuals' and firms' decisions in terms of product supply and factor demand; 
factor markets and income distribution; general interdependency among economic variables. 

Mr. Seagraves 

AGC 642 ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION, DEMAND AND MARKET 

INTERDEPENDENCY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: AGC 641, ST 511 or equivalent 

An advanced study in the theory of, and research related to, household behavior; aggre- 
gative consequences of household decisions concerning factor supply and product demand; 
pricing and income distribution; economic equilibrium. 

Mr. King 

AGC 651 (ST 651) ECONOMETRIC METHODS I 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 521, AGC 642 

Decision-making under uncertainty; stochastic elements in economic theories; problems of 
model construction; special techniques for analyzing simultaneous economic relations. 

Graduate Staff 

AGC 652 (ST 652) ECONOMETRIC METHODS II 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 522, AGC 641 

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of significance as applied to economic data; empirical 
sampling methods; non-parametric methods; sequential testing; extension of least squares 
methods to research in economics; production surfaces; special topics in variance components 
and mixed models; use of experimental designs in economic research; elements of multi- 
variates analysis; techniques for analysis of time series. 

Graduate Staff 

AGC 671 ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 641 

A theoretical and empirical study of the processes of economic growth; the problems of 
underdeveloped countries; the role of agriculture in a developing economy; an examination 
of policies and programs needed for effective economic development. 

Mr. Maddox 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

AGE 151, 152 FARM MECHANICS 2 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ASE or ATE curriculum 

These courses are designed to acquaint Agricultural Engineering students with materials and 
tool processes related to the various fields of endeavor in Agricultural Engineering; also 
to develop the student's ability to plan in terms of the manual and managerial skills re- 
lated to the utilization of such materials and processes. 

Mr. Blum 

AGE 201 AGRICULTURAL CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE I 2 (1-3) f s 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with planning procedures, construction 
materials and woodworking tools, building layout and design, and preventative maintenance. 
Limited laboratory practice in the manual and managerial skills involved in the utilization 
of such information is included. 

Messrs. Howell, Blum 



Agricultural Engineering 199 

age 202 agricultural construction and maintenance ii 2 (1-3) f s 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the manual and managerial skills in- 
volved in the construction, repair, and maintenance of farm machinery and utilities. The 
use of materials, tools, and facilities needed will be stressed. Considerable emphasis will 
be placed on arc and oxyacetylene welding. 

Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 211 FARM POWER AND MACHINERY I 3 (2-2) f s 

Corequisite: PY 201 or PY 211 for ASE or ATE students 

A study of modern farm machinery, power units and equipment with emphasis on selection, 
operation, maintenance, care and adjustments from the operator's viewpoint. 

Messrs. Fore, Garner, Howell 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGE 303 ENERGY CONVERSION FOR AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: BO 103 or ZO 103, MA 112 or MA 201, PY 211 or PY 201 
Energy transformations and exchanges of plants and animals are studied on the basis of 
physical theories and principles. Specific examples in thermal radiation, convection, con- 
duction, phase changes, muscle work, photosynthesis, respiration, and concentration of 
solutions will be discussed. 

Mr. Suggs 

AGE 321 IRRIGATION, DRAINAGE AND TERRACING 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 201 for ATE students 

Needs for irrigation in the Southeast and methods of accomplishment; methods of draining 
excess water from agricultural areas; the use of basic surveying equipment; and the need 
for and methods of accomplishing erosion control by mechanical measures to supplement 
vegetative programs. 

Mr. Sewell 

AGE 331 POWER HEATING, REFRIGERATION 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: PY 21 1 

Fundamentals of power application in the processing and preservation of perishable food 

products. 

Mr. Weaver 

AGE 332 FARM BUILDINGS AND CROP PROCESSING 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: EM 341 for ATE students 

Construction materials, structural features and design loads. Functional planning of farm 
buildings for housing domestic animals and for storing and handling farm crops. Curing and 
drying of farm crops. 

Messrs. Blum, Weaver 

AGE 341 FARM ELECTRIFICATION AND UTILITIES 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Problems and general study in the proper selection and use of applicable farm electric 
equipment and allied utilities. 

Mr. Weaver 

AGE 371 SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION ENGINEERING 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: CE 201, SOI 200 

General aspects of agricultural hydrology, including precipitation, classification of climate, 
rainfall disposition, methods of estimating runoff, fundamental soil and water relationships, 
and hydraulics of flow in open channels and closed conduits, will be given. Included also 
are factors affecting erosion, methods of controlling erosion, land use classification, drain- 
age, land clearing, irrigation methods, design requirements for portable irrigation systems, 
and economic aspects of irrigation in the Southeast. 

Mr. Wiser 

AGE 401 PROBLEMS IN FARM MECHANICS 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites: AGE 201, 202 Enrollment in Agricultural Education 

A study of the mechanical activities engaged in by the vocational agriculture teacher; with 
emphasis on the role of the teacher in the area of agricultural engineering technology. In- 
cluded is a study of facilities, equipment, and shop management. 

Mr. Howell 

AGE 411 FARM POWER AND MACHINERY MB 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: AGE 211 

This course is designed to provide students in Agricultural Engineering Technology with a 
knowledge of the operations of manufacturing and distributing organizations of farm ma- 
chinery and their places in these organizations. Included is a practical course in farm 
tractors and engines with emphasis on familiarizing the student with component parts — their 
application, operation, and maintenance, as well as with the selection of these units from 
the standpoint of power, performance, and ratings. 

Messrs. Fore, Greene 



200 Agricultural Engineering 

age 451 conditioning principles for plant and animal systems 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

Principles of heat transfer and diffusion are presented using the mathematical equations 
to point out analogous systems. The use of electric analogs to describe thermal and 
diffusion fields is demonstrated. Psychrometric and heat transfer principles are used to 
indicate methods of conditioning the environment in agricultural structures. Thin layers 
drying theory and dimensional analysis are used to describe bulk drying systems of 
agricultural crops. 

Mr. Jordan 

AGE 452 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Students will prepare talks in their particular field of interest, presenting them to the 
group. Also, two or three field trips to selected points of educational opportunities will be 
made during the second semester. Maximum of two credits allowed. 

Mr. Hassler 

AGE 462 FARM POWER AND MACHINERY HA 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: AGE 211, EM 321 

A study of engineering analysis as it applies to problems in the power and machinery 
field of Agricultural Engineering. The course is intended to strengthen the students ability 
to approach agricultural engineering problems in a systematic manner. 

Mr. Bowen 

AGE 481 AGRICULTURAL STRUCTURES AS PRODUCTION UNITS 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: AGE 451, EM 321 

Application of conditioning principles to provide the required environment for optimum 
agricultural production is stressed. Environmental requirements of animals and of harvested 
crops are discussed. Analysis for labor reduction and the replacement of human decisions 
with electric controls are indicated. Environmental requirements, proper arrangement, equip- 
ment, equipment selection and control, and estimation of external loads are presented 
to indicate the design procedures for a sound, functional building. A term report of the 
student's choice is required to demonstrate his comprehension of the underlying principles 
of the problem, and also to test his ability to express himself. 

Mr. Jordan 

AGE 491 RURAL ELECTRIFICATION 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: EE 320 

Wiring and circuitry for both single and three phase applications of electricity to farm 
and rural community processes and operations. A very brief study of the local and regional 
organization as developed by the electric industries for the dependable generation, trans- 
mission, and distribution of power. Electric motor characteristics and selection are studied 
in the laboratory along with those of water systems, feed grinders and mixers; lighting 
systems, cooling, ventilating, heating, and the application of switches and controls. 

Mr. Weaver 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGE 551 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing in Agricultural Engineering 

Each student will select a subject on which he will do research and write a technical report 
on his results. He may choose a subject pertaining to his particular interest in any area 
of study in Agricultural Engineering. 

Mr. Hassler, Staff 

AGE 552 INSTRUMENTATION FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 

AND PROCESSING 1 (0-2) f or s 

Prerequisites. EE 320, MA 401 

Elaboration of the theory and principles of various primary sensing elements. Relates the 
output signal of electrical transducers to wheatstone bridge and potentiometer measuring 
circuits for calibration of the signal with the variable under study. Introduces the principles 
of circuits and mechanisms used for indicating, recording, and/or controlling process 
variables. Representative equipment will be employed whenever feasible. 

Mr. Hassler 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

AGE 651 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate status in Agricultural Engineering 

Performance of a particular investigation of concern to Agricultural Engineering. The 
study will begin with the selection of a problem and culminate with the presentation of a 
thesis. A miximum of six credits is allowed towards a Masters Degree; no limitation on 
credits in Doctorate program. 

Graduate Staff 



Air Science 201 

AGE 652 SEMINAR 1 (l-O) f j 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Elaboration of subject areas, techniques and methods peculiar to professional interest 

through presentations of personal and published works; opportunity for students to 

present and defend their ideas, concepts and inferences. A maximum of two credits may be 

earned. 

Graduate Staff 

AGE 654 AGRICULTURAL PROCESS ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f or I 

Prerequisites: AGE 451, PY 402, AAA 511 

Operations employed during processing for maximizing consumer quality and economic 
gain. Agricultural processing operations are analyzed on a "unit operotion" basis, taking 
into consideration physical and chemical changes. Generalized physical theory will be 
presented as it relates to idealizations in agricultural processing. 

Mr. Hassler 

AGE 661 ANALYSIS OF FUNCTION AND DESIGN OF FARM MACHINERY 3 (2-3) f or s 
Prerequisites: AGE 462, MA 401. PY 401, Statistics 

Methods and tools used in determining the functional requirements of machine components; 
writing of machine specifications in terms of fundamental parameters; introduction of the 
principles of discriminate and indiscriminate mechanical selection of agricultural products 
with emphasis on the theory of servo-systems. Mr. Bowen 

AGE 671 THEORY OF DRAINAGE IRRIGATION AND EROSION CONTROL 4 (3-3) f or s 
Prerequisites: AGE 371, EM 430, MA 401 

Emphasis is placed on the physical and mathematical aspects of problems in conservation 
engineering and an attempt is made to rationalize procedures which have often come 
about through experience rather than through analytical considerations. Examples are 
presented of cases where such an analytical approach has already improved, or shows 
promise of improving, design criteria and procedures. 

Mr. van Schilfgaarde 

AGE 681 ANALYSIS OF FUNCTION AND DESIGN OF FARM BUILDINGS 4 (4-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: AGE 481, PY 402 

A study of the functional requirements of farm structures with respect to man, animals 
and crops and development of the means for providing structures which fulfill the func- 
tional requirements. Application of the science and art of engineering in the solution of 
environmental problems. Advanced planning in the integration of structural and environ- 
mental design. 

Graduate Staff 

AGRICULTURE 

AG 103 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE 1 (0-2) f 

A study of Agriculture as a profession and as it relates to the entire economy of the United 
States. 

AG 301 AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS FOR AGRICULTURE 2 (2-0) s 

A study of the major educational and service agencies designed to advance agriculture 
and rural living. The development of agricultural problems in the United States is traced 
as a background for consideration of the objectives, organization and procedures of these 
agencies and programs. 

Mr. Sloan 

AG 401 PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF EXTENSION EDUCATION 3 (3-0) I 

Prerequisite: Senior standing (Graduate credit in special cases with permission of committee) 
A study of the background, development and operation of the Agricultural Extension 
Service. Consideration is given to major events leading to the establishment of Agricul- 
tural Extension, its objectives, organization and philosophy. Major emphasis is placed upon 
the principles underlying extension education together with methods of program building 
and teaching. 

Mr. Sloan 



AIR SCIENCE 



THE BASIC COURSE 

AS 121 AIR SCIENCE I 1 (0-1) f 

During the fall semester, each student will be required to participate in the Leadership 
Laboratory program for one hour per week. Classroom requirements will be met by the 
satisfactory completion of at least three academic hours of on approved course in the 
field of mathematics, modern languages or humanities. 



202 Animal Industry 

AS 122 AIR SCIENCE I 1 (2-1) s 

During the spring semester, each student will attend a two hour per week class under the 
Air Science Department for instruction in foundations of air power including the subjects 
of the military instrument of national security, elements and potentials of air power, 
Evolution of aerial warfare and Air Vehicles and principles of flight. In addition, one hour 
per week will continue to be devoted to the leadership laboratory program. 

AS 221 AIR SCIENCE 2 1 (2-1) f 

Continued study in foundations of air power dealing with the subjects of evolution of 
aerial warfare, elements of aerial warfare, employment of Air Forces and space operations. 
Leadership laboratory training for one hour per week will be required in addition. 

AS 222 AIR SCIENCE 2 1 (0-1) s 

Leadership laboratory will continue, however, the classroom requirements will be met by 
satisfactory completion of at least three academic hours of an approved course in the fields 
of physical or natural sciences, or in the intermediate levels of mathematics, modern 
languages, humanities or social sciences. 



THE ADVANCED COURSE 

The leadership laboratory program continues for one hour per week throughout the advanced 
course with students assuming command and control of progressively larger units and greater 
responsibilities. 

AS 321 AIR SCIENCE 3 1 (2-1) f 

Prerequisites: Air Science 1 and 2 or equivalent credit. 

Instruction deals with the Air Force Commander and his staff, creative problem solving and 
the leadership laboratory. Classroom requirements will be partially met by the satisfactory 
completion of either SOC-301, SOC-501, or EC-426. 

AS 322 AIR SCIENCE 3 2 (3-1) s 

Instruction is given in the military justice system, communicating and instructing in the 
Air Force and leadership laboratory. 

AS 421 AIR SCIENCE 4 1 (3-1) f 

Prerequisites: Air Science 3 and AFROTC Summer Training. 

Instruction deals with weather and navigation, a flying instruction program, a study of the 
military aspects of world political geography and the leadership laboratory. 

AS 422 AIR SCIENCE 4 2 (2-1) s 

A study of the military aspects of world political geograph, a briefing for commissioned 
service and the leadership laboratory. Classroom requirements will be partially met by the 
satisfactory completion of one of these courses: PS-302, HI-415, SS-301, SS-302, SS-491, 
SS-492. 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Al 201 ELEMENTS OF DAIRY SCIENCE 4 (3-3) f t 

Fundamental principles of milk production; breeds, selection, feeding and management 
of dairy cattle; composition, quality and food value of milk products; principles of processing 
and manufacturing dairy products. 

Staff 

Al 202 FUNDAMENTALS OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 4 (3-3) f s 

Principles of feeding, managing and marketing meat animals. Year to year and seasonal 
price trends and relationships. Relation of slaughter grades to carcass cut-out values. 

Mr. Goode 

Al 301 GRADING AND SELECTING MEAT ANIMALS 2 (0-6) s 

Study of breed characteristics and type by species. Market classes and grades of beef 
cattle, sheep and hogs relating live animal grade to carcass grade and cut-out value. 

Mr. Gregory 

Al 303 MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 451 

Study of live animal and carcass relationship, dressing percentages and cut-out values. 
Slaughtering, cutting, curing, freezing and handling of meat and meat products for com- 
mercial and home use. 

Messrs. Blumer, Craig 



Animal Industry 203 

Al 305 SELECTING DAIRY CATTLE 2 (0-6) f 

A study of dairy breed organization, functions, herd books and pedigree writing. Correla- 
tion of type ana performance of dairy cattle and practice in orol expression of type. 

Mr. Murley 

Al 306 SELECTING DAIRY CATTLE (ADVANCED) 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: Al 305, approval of instructor 

Advanced study on correlation of type and performance of dairy cattle with emphasis on 
oral expression of type. A study of show-ring classification and practice in fitting and 
showing of animals. 

Mr.Murley 

Al 307 ADVANCED SELECTION AND EVALUATION OF LIVESTOCK 1 (0-6) f 

Prerequisite: Al 301 

Study of standards of animal excellence stressing the importance of methods in making 
rapid observations and appraisals and formulating logical and accurate decisions. Practice 
in oral expression will be provided. 

Mr. Gregory 

Al 309 MEAT SELECTION 1 (0-6) f 

Detailed consideration of factors involved in selection of carcasses and wholesale cuts 
of beef, pork and lamb. Practice in indentification of wholesale and retail cuts. 

Mr. Blumer 

Al 312 PRINCIPLES OF LIVESTOCK NUTRITION 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: CH 431, ZO 301 

Fundamentals of modern animal nutrition, including classification of nutrients, their 
general metabolism and roles in productive functions. 

Mr. Ramsey 

Al 404 DAIRY FARM PROBLEMS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Al 201 

Advanced study of practical dairy farm management including farm records, farm buildings, 
sanitation, roughage utilization and herd culling. 

Mr. Murley 

Al 406 ANIMAL INDUSTRY SEMINAR 1 (1-0) s 

Review and discussion of special topics and the current literature pertaining to all phases 
of animal industry. 

Mr. Hyatt 

Al 407 ADVANCED LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: GN 411, Al 312 

A study of the economic, nutritional, genetic, physiological and managerial factors affecting 
the operation of commercial and purebred livestock enterprises. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES* 

Al 407 ADVANCED LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive organs and mommary glands with detailed 
coverage of physiological processes involved and factors controlling and influencing them. 
Specific applications to farm animals including artificial insemination. 

Messrs. Mochrie, Myers, Ulberg 

Al 503 (GN 503) GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF LIVESTOCK 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

Traits of economic importance in livestock production, and their mode of inheritance. 
Phenotypic and genetic relationships between traits. The place of selection, inbreeding and 
crossbreeding in a program of animal improvement. 

Mr. Robison 

Al 505 DISEASES OF FARM ANIMALS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CH 101, CH 203; BO 421 desired 

The pathology of bacterial, virus, parasitic, nutritional and thermal diseases, and mechanical 
disease processes. 

Mr. Osborne 

Al 507 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL INDUSTRY Maximum 6 f s 

Special problems may be selected or assigned in various phases of Animal Industry. A 
maximum of six credits is allowed. Staff 

Al 513 NEEDS AND UTILIZATION OF NUTRIENTS BY LIVESTOCK 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: Al 312 or equivalent 

Measurement of nutrient needs of livestock and the nutrient values of feeds. Nutritive 
requirements for productive functions. 

Mr. Wise 



204 Anthropology 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

Al 600 RESEARCH IN ANIMAL INDUSTRY Credits by arrangement f s 

A maximum of six hours is allowed toward the Master's degree; no limitation on credits 
in Doctorate programs. 

Graduate Staff 

Al 601 SEMINAR IN ANIMAL NUTRITION 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Permission of seminar leaders 

Orientation in philosophy of research; organization for research in agriculture, and general 

research methodology. 

Nutrition Staff 

Al 602 (GN 602) POPULATION GENETICS IN ANIMAL IMPROVEMENT 3 (Arranged) f 

Prerequisites: ST 512, GN 512 

A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its effects, and altera- 
tive breeding plans. 

Mr. Legates 

Al 603 ANIMAL NUTRITION: MINERAL METABOLISM 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Role of minerals in the nutrition of animals with emphasis on available knowledge, a digest 
of progress already made and directions in which investigations need to be extended. 

Mr. Matrone 

Al 604 EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 4 (2-4) 

Prerequisite: ZO 513 or equivalent 

A study of the theories and techniques involved in the use of animals in physiological 

investigation. 

Messrs. Ulberg, Thomas, Wise 

Al 614 (BO 614) BACTERIAL METABOLISM 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites, BO 312, CH 551 

A study of the physical structure and chemical composition of microorganisms; the in- 
fluence of physical and chemical agents on growth and reproduction; the metabolism of 
carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. 

Mr. McNeill 

Al 621 (CH 621) ENZYMES AND INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM 4 (3-4) f 

Prerequisites: CH 511, permission of instructor 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action; intermediary metabolism of 

carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and phorphrins; meabolic energy 

relationships. 

Mr. Tove 

Al 622 (CH 622, ST 622) PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL ASSAYS 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: CH 551, ST 512 

Techniques and designs of biological assays for vitamins. The interrelationship of logical 
principles, design and analysis is emphasized. 

Messrs. Smart, Tove 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 251 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

The study of the development of man as a species; analysis of the formation and spread 
of races; introduction to archaelogy as a study of the material remains of ancient man 
and his activities. 

ANT 252 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

The analysis of various living societies and their cultures in terms of social adjustment 
to recurrent needs. 

ANT 305 PEOPLES OF THE WORLD 3 (3-0) f t 

This course seeks to develop insights of wide applicability concerning human relationships 
and the adjustment of man to his geographical, social, and cultural environments. The 
course is designed to demonstrate interrelationships among diverse factors affecting human 
behavior in all societies. 



Architecture 205 

ant 410 theories of culture 3 (3.0) f 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

The study of major anthropological theories of culture with intensive analysis of their 

application. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 512— APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

Special problem areas such as administration, education, health, industrialization, and 
urbanization are viewed from the standpoint of recent findings in cultural anthropology. 



ARCHITECTURE 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 201, 202 Architectural Design I, II 4 (3-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 102 

Required of second year students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 
Introductory exercises in architectural design. The design of small buildings of specific 
function and simple construction which can be related to the student's experience; em- 
phasis on the influence of environment, climate, etc. 

Messrs. Buisson, Burns, Shaw, 

ARC 300 HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH 2 credits s 

Prerequisite: ARC 202 

Required of all students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

Research and the recording of sites, monuments, buildings, or artifacts of historical interest. 

Mr. Elliott 

ARC 301, 302 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III, IV 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 202, EM 311, PY 211 
Required of third year students in Architecture 

Continuing exercises in architectural design, based on larger buildings with more complex 
interior and exterior relationships. Emphasis on the problems of functional planning, re- 
search on building requirements, and recognized methods of construction. 

Messrs. Elliott, Waugh 

ARC 312 MATERIALS AND SPECIFICATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ARC 202 

Required of third year students in Architecture 

Functional and physical characteristics of building materials; the preparation of archi- 
tectural specifications. 

Mr. Waugh 

ARC 401, 402 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V, VI 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 302, CE 339, EM 321 
Required of fourth year students in Architecture 

The design of large buildings or building complexes and economic and sociological influ- 
ences on them, stressing the use of technology and industrialization. Emphasis on the logical 
coordination of the many factors of building design. 

Mr. Matsumoto 

ARC 421, 422 STRUCTURAL DESIGN I, II 3 (3.3) f , 

Prerequisite: CE 339 

Required of fourth year students in Architecture 

Principles and applications of steel and timber design; principles and application of rein- 
forced concrete design; and elements of foundations. 

Mr. Kahn 

ARC 501, 502 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VII, VIII 7, 9 (3-12) f t 

Prerequisites: ARC 402, ARC 300 
Required of fifth year students in Architecture 

A continuation of ARC 401, 402 with special emphasis on the development of arch-typical 
designs and the use of subjective selection by the designer. An architectural thesis is re- 
quired in the spring semester. 

Mr. Caminos 

ARC 511 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: ARC 312 

Required for graduation in Architecture 

A study of the ethics, organization, and procedures of professional architectural practice; 

building codes, and legal obligations. 

Mr. Waugh 



206 Botany And Bacteriology 

arc 531, 532 structural design iii, iv 2 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: ARC 422 

Required of fifth year students in Architecture 

Comparative study of structures and structural elements; their possibilities and limitations; 

review and discussion of structural principles. Engineering consultation. 

Mr. Kahn 



BIOLOGY 



Bl 301 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

A survey of the major principles of the biological sciences. A course designed for students 
who have not had a college course in the biological sciences and who do not anticipate 
further study in biology. Not acceptable as a prerequisite for further work in the 
biological sciences. 

Staff 



BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 103 GENERAL BOTANY 4 (3-2) f s 

An introduction to the major non-green and green plant groups with emphasis on the 
anatomy, physiology and reproduction of flowering plants. 

Staff 

BO 201 AQUATIC VASCULAR PLANTS 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A comprehensive survey of marsh and aquatic vascular plants with emphasis on identi- 
fication and habitat relationships. (Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Beal 

BO 211 DENDROLOGY I 2 (1-3) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A systematic survey of the principal hardwood (Angiosperm) genera and species of North 
America. Emphasis is upon field identification during the spring. 

Mr. Hardin 

BO 212 DENDROLOGY II 2 (1-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A systematic survey of the principal evergreen (Gymnosperm) genera and species of North 
America. Emphasis is upon field identification of Gymnosperms and also hardwoods using 
winter characteristics. 

Mr. Hardin 

BO 301 GENERAL MORPHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A survey of the principal groups of plants from the standpoint of their structure, develop- 
ment and reproduction. Emphasis is placed upon evolutionary relationships as revealed by 
comparisons in body organization and life histories of living and extinct forms. Some time 
is spent on general identification of plants in their native habitats. 

Mr. Ball 

BO 312 GENERAL BACTERIOLOGY 4 (2-4) f s 

Prerequisites: BO 103 or ZO 103, CH 101 

Open to students in Sanitary Engineering with only the chemistry prerequisite. Occurrence 
and activities of microorganisms in nature and disease. A study of the basic concepts 
and techniques of bacteriology; isolation, cultivation, observation, morphology, physiology, 
and nutrition of microorganisms. 

Messrs. J. B. Evans, Elkan 

BO 403 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 3 (0-6) s 
Prerequisite: BO 103 

A systematic survey of vascular plants emphasizing field identification, terminology, and 

general evolutionary relationships. Mr. Beal 

BO 407 (DM 407) DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY I 4 (2-4) f 

Mr. Speck. 



Botany And Bacteriology 207 

bo 410 plant histology and microtechnique 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, CH 203 

Studies of the principal tissues of Angiosperms in terms of the theory and practice of 

optical instrumentation, microtechnical preparations, and photomicrography. 

Mr. Ball 

BO 421 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 4 (2-4) f c 

Prerequisites: BO 103, CH 203 or CH 103 

An introductory treatment of the chemical and physical processes occurring in higher 
green plants with emphasis upon the mechanisms, factors affecting, correlations between 
processes and biological significance. 

Messrs. Scofield, Troyer 

BO 441 PLANT ECOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

An introduction to the study of plants in relation to their environment. Major topics con- 
sidered are: factors of the environment; the structure, analysis, and dynamics of plant 
communities; past and present distribution of vegetation types. 

Mr. Cooper 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 506 (DM 506) DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY II 3 (0-6) s 

Mr. Speck 

BO 512 MORPHOLOGY OF VASCULAR PLANTS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of comparative morphology, ontogeny and evolution of the vascular plants. 
Emphasis is placed upon the phylogeny of sexual reproduction and of the vascular systems. 

Mr. Ball 

BO 513 PLANT ANATOMY 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of the anatomy of the Angiosperms and Gymnosperms. The development of 
tissues is traced from their origin by meristems to their mature states. 

Mr. Ball 

BO 521 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY OF MONOCOT FAMILIES 3 (0-6) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, BO 403 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of monocot families. Special em- 
phasis is given to terminology, morphology, identification and relationships. 
(Offered in odd numbered years) 

Mr. Beal 

BO 523 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY OF DICOT FAMILIES 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, 403 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of dicot families. Special em- 
phasis is given to terminology, morphology, identification, and relationships. 
(Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Hardin 

BO 531 (SOI 532) SOIL MICROBIOLOGY 3 (0-6) s 

Mr. Bartholomew 

BO 532 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY I 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: BO 421 or equivalent 

An odvanced treatment of water, solute, and gas relations of higher green plants, with 

emphasis on theoretical principles. 

Mr. Troyer 

BO 533 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY II 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 or equivalent 

An advanced treatment of metabolism and growth in higher green plants, with emphasis 
on theoretical principles. 

Mr. Troyer 

BO 545 ADVANCED PLANT ECOLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 421, BO 441 or equivalents 

An advanced consideration, through class discussions and individual projects, of the prin- 
ciples, theories, and methods of plant ecology. 

Mr. Cooper 

BO 570 (CE 570) SANITARY MICROBIOLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

BO 574 PHYCOLOGY 3 (1-4) $ 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of important and representative genera from each of the nine classes of algae, 
both marine and fresh water. Chief emphasis will be on structure, reproduction and 
taxonomic relationships, but considerable attention will also be given to algal ecology es- 
pecially the community and habitat relationships of local and state flora. 

Mr. Whitford 



208 Ceramic Engineering 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BO 603 (DM 603) ADVANCED DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY 4 (arranged) f s 

Mr. Speck 

BO 614 (Al 614) BACTERIAL METABOLISM 2 (2-0) s 

Mr. McNeill 

BO 620 ADVANCED TAXONOMY 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: BO 521, BO 523 or permission of instructor. 

A course in the principles of plant taxonomy including the history of taxonomy, systems 
of classification, rules of nomenclature, taxonomic literature, taxonomic and biosystematic 
methods, and monographic techniques. (Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Hardin 

BO 632 (SOI 632) ADVANCED SOIL MICROBIOLOGY 2 to 4 arranged 

Mr. Bartholomew 

BO 635 THE MINERAL NUTRITION OF PLANTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 421 and a course in Biochemistry 

Discussion of the accumulation, translocation and utilization of mineral elements by higher 

plants. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between these processes and plant 

metabolism. 

Mr. H. J. Evans 

BO 640 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BACTERIOLOGY Credits arranged f s 

Directed research in some specialized phase of Bacteriology other than a thesis problem 
but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Mr. J. B. Evans 

BO 641 RESEARCH IN BACTERIOLOGY Credits arranged f s 

Original research preparatory to writing a Master's thesis or a Ph.D. dissertation. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 650 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY Credits arranged f s 

Directed research in some specialized phase of Botany other than a thesis problem but 
designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 651 RESEARCH IN BOTANY Credits arranged f s 

Original research preparatory to writing a Master's thesis or a Ph.D. dissertation. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 660 BACTERIOLOGY SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to Bac- 
teriologists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit allowed if one paper per 
semester is presented at seminar. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 661 BOTANY SEMINAR (1 (1-0) f s 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to botanists 
are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit allowed if one paper per semester is 
presented at seminar. 

Graduate Staff 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MIC 210 CERAMIC MATERIALS AND PROCESSES 3 (2-3) f s 

Designed for students not majoring in Ceramic Engineering. Includes raw materials, form- 
ing processes, effect of thermal treatment, properties and uses of ceramic products. 
Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 301 CERAMIC OPERATIONS I 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIM 201 

Unit operations pertaining to ceramic product manufacture. Crushing, grinding, particle 
size classification and packing. Colloidal and rheological properties of slips, slurries, and 
plastic masses. Lectures and laboratory. 

MIC 302 CERAMIC OPERATIONS II 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisites: MIC 301, PY 201 

A continuation of MIC 301. Dewatering of slips and slurries. Properties of air and air- 
vapor mixtures, heat transmission, fluid flow, drying, drier calculators, furnaces, kilns and 
kiln calculations. Lecture and Laboratory. 



Ceramic Engineering 209 

mic 312 ceramic process principles i 4 (3-3) s 

Corequisite: MIC 302 

Effect of heat on non-metallic minerals. Thermodynamic calculations. Industrial fuels and 
combustion, review of heterogeneous equilibria. Crystal structures. Pyrochemical and pyro- 
physical changes in ceramic bodies. Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 413 CERAMIC PROCESS PRINCIPLES II 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: MIC 312, CH 532 

A continuation of MIC 312. A study of the glassy state to include structure of glass, 
properties and types of glasses. Glazes, enamels, opacity, color and devitrification. Nature 
of glassy phases in kiln fired ceramic bodies. Lecture and Laboratory. 

MIC 414 SENIOR THESIS 3 (1-6) f i 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be elected. 
An introduction to research. Literature search, laboratory investigation and written report 
in the form of a thesis. Conference and laboratory. 

MIC 415, 416 CERAMIC ENGINEERING DESIGN 2 (0-6) f t 

The methods of ceramic equipment, structures and plant designing. 

MIC 420 INDUSTRIAL CERAMICS 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the various ceramic Industries, including manufacturing techniques, labor and 

professional relationships, and the present and future status of the respective industries. 
Lectures and discussion. 

MIC 425 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be elected 
literature survey of selected topics in ceramic engineering. Oral and written reports, discus- 
sions. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MIC 503 CERAMIC MICROSCOPY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 531 

Petrographic techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials and products. Inter- 
pretation and representation of results. 

MIC 505 RESEARCH AND CONTROL METHODS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Interpretation of results, instrumental methods applied to research and product develop- 
ment. Statistical quality control. 

MIC 507, 508 ADVANCED CERAMIC EXPERIMENTS 3 (1-6) f t 

Prerequisite: MIC 414 or equivalent 

Advanced studies in ceramic laboratory experimentation. 

MIC 511 ADVANCED STUDIES IN FIRING 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Advanced studies of ceramic firing procedures with emphasis on the design, calculation and 
economic evaluation of kilns and furnaces. 

MIC 522 STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of the structural clay products industries with emphasis on the latest de- 
velopments in the field. 

MIC 548 TECHNOLOGY OF CEMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of the Portland cement industry including manufacture, control and uses. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MIC 605, 606 CRYSTAL STRUCTURES 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 532 

Basic laws of crystal structure. Relation of crystal structure to chemical and physical prop- 
erties. 

MIC 613 CERAMIC THERMAL MINERALOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 605 

Applications of the principles of thermalchemical mineralogy to ceramic problems. 

MIC 615, 616 HIGH TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY 3 (2-3) 

Prerequisite: MIC 613 

An advanced consideration of the generation of high temperatures, furnace designs, and 
atmosphere controls. Theory of sintering hot pressing and thermo-chemical properties of 
high-temperature materials. 



210 Chemical Engineering 

MIC 650 CERAMIC RESEARCH 1 to 9 credits 

per semester 

An original and independent investigation in ceramic engineering. A report of such an in- 
vestigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

MIC 660 CERAMIC ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Reports and discussion of special topics in ceramic engineering and allied fields. 

MIC 661 SPECIAL STUDIES IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 1 to 3 credits 

per semester 

Special studies of advanced topics in ceramic engineering. Credit will vary with the topic. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 205 CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisites: MA 102, CH 103 

Required of sophomore in Chemical Engineering 

The calculation of material and energy balances, stoichiometry, gas laws, vapor pressure, 

humidity, saturation, themophysics and thermpchemistry. Three lectures and one problem 

period. 

CHE 301, 302 ELEMENTS OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f s 

An introduction to principles of chemical engineering including calculations involved in 

industrial processes and equipment. The course is designed for students not majoring in 
chemical engineering. 

CHE 311 INTRODUCTORY CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 205 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering 

A continuation of CHE 205. One laboratory period is devoted to typical chemical engineer- 
ing measurements. 

CHE 411 UNIT OPERATIONS I 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: MA 202, PY 202 
Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering 

Principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, evaporation, etc., with emphasis on design calcula- 
tions. 

CHE 412 UNIT OPERATIONS II 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 411 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 

A continuation of CHE 411 with emphasis on the diffusional operations such as absorption, 

distillation, extraction, drying, etc. 

CHE 415 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering 

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engineering prob- 
lems. Emphasis on the theory, data and approximation methods as applied to physical and 
chemical systems. 

CHE 431, 432 UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY I AND II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 41 1 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Laboratory work on typical apparatus involving the unit operations. Experiments are de- 
signed to augment the theory and data of the lecture courses and to develop proficiency 
in the writing of technical reports. 

CHE 453 CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS 3 (3-0) 

Consideration of the unique procedures required for the bulk manipulation of radioactive 
chemicals. Particular attention is given to remote operational procedures of precipitation, 
centrifugation, conveying, solvent extraction and ion exchange. Design of apparatus in- 
volving low maintenance and ease of replacement and cleaning by safe methods is con- 
sidered. Other topics include decontamination procedures and disposal of wastes. 

CHE 460 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f ■ 

One semester required of seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Literature survey of selected topics in chemical engineering. Emphasis on written and oral 

presentation. 

CHE 470 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 2 Arrange f s 

Elective for seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Introduction to research through experimental, theoretical and literature studies of chemi- 
cal engineering problems. Oral and written presentation of reports. 



Chemical Engineering 211 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 525 PROCESS MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 41 1 

Theory and application of methods for measuring, transmitting, recording and controlling 
such process variables as temperature, pressure, flow rate, liquid level, concentration, hu- 
midity, etc. Commercial instruments are utilized for study of a wide variety of industrial 
control problems. Recorder-controllers are available to simulating industrial control problems 
of varying difficulty. 

CHE 527 CHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

A study of selected chemical processes with emphasis on the engineering, chemical and 
economic factors involved. 

CHE 540 ELECTROCHEMICAL ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry 

The application of electrochemical principles to such topics as electrolysis, electroanalysis, 
electroplating, metal refining, etc. 

CHE 541 CELLULOSE INDUSTRIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. Emphasis 
placed on recent development in the fields of synthetic fibers, films, lacquers and other 
cellulose compounds. 

CHE 542 TECHNOLOGY OF PULP AND PAPER 3 Arrange f 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Fundamentals of pulp and paper manufacture with emphasis on recent advances in the 
field. One laboratory period per week is devoted to topics such as digestion and treatment 
of pulp, handsheet preparation and testing, fiber analysis and chemical and physical tests. 

CHE 543 TECHNOLOGY OF PLASTICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

The properties, methods of manufacture and application of synthetic resins. Recent develop- 
ments in the field are stressed. 

CHE 545 PETROLEUM REFINERY ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An introduction to the petroleum industry including (1) nature of petroleum and its frac- 
tions, octane numbers, viscosity relationships, etc., (2) operations of thermal and catalytic 
cracking, stabilization, alkylation isomerization, crude fractionation, etc., (3) problem work 
covering high pressure phase relationships and related material. 

CHE 546 CHEMICAL REACTION RATES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 415 

A basic study of the rates of homogeneous reactions, heterogeneous reactions and catalysis. 

CHE 551 THERMAL PROBLEMS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: 302 or ME 303 or CHE 411 or equivalent 

The design and operation of nuclear reactors and the utilization of the power from them 

involves major problems in nearly every phase of heat transfer, and many important problems 

in fluid flow. Possible solutions to these problems are severely affected by the influences 

of radiation on heat transfer media, hazards of handling radioactive substances, etc. The 

course considers the thermal problems of nuclear reactor design and the principles of fluid 

flow and heat transfer necessary to their solutions. 

The course is intended for engineers and science students with backgrounds in physics and 

mathematics and elementary thermodyamics. 

CHE 553 SEPARATION PROCESSES IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 or equivalent 

A study of the principles and techniques of separation and purification of chemical com- 
ponents, based upon mass transfer by diffusion. Specific techniques covered are distillation, 
extraction, adsorption and ion exchange, particularly in regard to continuous, counter-cur- 
rent operations. Special topics include a survey of fuel processing, technology of uranium 
processing, complexing actions of solvents and halide distillation. 

The course is primarily intended for engineers and science students with backgrounds in 
mathematics, physics and elementary chemistry but who have had no previous course in 
separation processes. 

CHE 570 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite or concurrent: CHE 412 

A laboratory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied field. 



212 Chemistry 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CHE 610 HEAT TRANSFER I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 41 1 

An advanced course dealing primarily with heat transfer between liquids and solids, 
optimum operating conditions and design of equipment, conduction, heating and cooling 
of solids, radiant heat transmission. 

CHE 611 HEAT TRANSFER II 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 610 

An intensive study of recent advances in heat transfer and allied fields. 

CHE 612 DIFFUSIONAL OPERATIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An advanced treatment of mass transfer particularly as applied to absorption, extraction, 

drying, humidification and dehumidification. 

CHE 613 DISTILLATION 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Vapor-liquid equilibria of non-ideal solutions, continuous distillation of binary and multi- 
component systems, batch distillation, azeotropic and extraction distillation. 

CHE 614 DRYING OF SOLIDS 2 (2-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An advanced course on the mechanism of drying operations with application to design of 
equipment, such as cabinet, tunnel, rotary, drum and spray driers. 

CHE 615 THERMODYNAMICS I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 415 

Advanced topics in Chemical Engineering thermodynamics including equilibria of physical 
and chemical systems, high pressure systems, generalized properties of hydrocarbons, etc. 

CHE 616 THERODYNAMICS II 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 615 

An intenstive study of recent advances in thermodynamics. 

CHE 617 CATALYSIS OF INDUSTRIAL REACTIONS 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 546 

A study of the mechanism of catalysis with emphasis on practical application to operation 

and design of industrial processes. 

CHE 631, 632 CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Design and selection of process equipment, through solution of comprehensive problems 
involving unit operations, kinetics, thermodynamics, strength of materials and chemistry. 

CHE 641, 642 ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 2 Arrange f < 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Advanced laboratory work in a selected field with emphasis on theory, techniques and per- 
formance of equipment. 

CHE 650 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 1 to 3 credits 

per semester f s 

A study of recent developments in chemical engineering theory and practice, such as ion 
exchange, crystallization, mixing, molecular distillation, hydrogenation, fluorination, etc. 
The topic will vary from term to term. 

CHE 660 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR . 1 credit 

per semester f s 

Literature investigations and reports of special topics in chemical engineering and allied 
fields. 

CHE 680 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 1 to 9 credits 

per semester t s 

Independent investigations of an advanced chemical engineering problem. A report of such 
an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 



CHEMISTRY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 101 GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4 (3-2) f • 

The language of chemistry, fundamental chemical laws and theories, limited study of 
selected chemical elements, compounds, reactions, and processes. 

Staff 



Chemistry 213 

ch 102 general inorganic chemistry 4 (3-3) f ■ 

The language of chemistry, fundamental laws and theories, limited study of selected 
chemical elements, compounds and reactions. Emphasis upon atomic structure. Designed 
for students who plan to take advanced courses in chemistry. 

Staff 

CH 102L GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: CH 102 

Laboratory work to supplement the laboratory of CH 102. 

CH 103 GENERAL AND QUALITATIVE CHEMISTRY 4 (3-2) f t 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, metallurgy, funda- 
mental properties of metals, non-metals and their compounds; introductions to organic and 
nuclear chemistry, industrial applications of some metals, non-metals and their compounds. 
The laboratory work is entriely semimicro qualitative analysis. 

Stoff 

CH 103L SEMIMICRO QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: 1 year of general chemistry not including qualitative analysis 
Chiefly the laboratory work of CH 103. 

CH 104 GENERAL CHEMISTRY AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 (3-3) f t 

Prerequisite: CH 102 

Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria and their applications to qualitative analysis; 
limited study of selected chemical elements, compounds, and reactions; introduction to 
nuclear chemistry. Emphasis upon ionic equilibria. The laboratory work is entirely semimicro 
qualitative analysis. Designed for students who plan to take advanced courses in chemistry. 

Staff 

CH 104L GENERAL CHEMISTRY QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: CH 104 

Laboratory work to supplement the laboratory of CH 104. 

CH 203 GENERAL AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4 (3-3) f t 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Chemistry 203 includes a further study of the principles of general chemistry as presented 
in CH 101, and also an introduction to organic chemistry. The organic chemistry survey 
includes the hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, acids and derivatives, esters, 
phenols, fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and a selected group of natural and 
synthetic products. 

Staff 

CH 211, 212 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 (2-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 104 

Volumetric analysis, including the techniques, chemistry, stoichiometry and basic chemical 
principles of neutralization, oxidation and precipitation analysis, potentiometric titrations, 
colorimetry, pH measurement, electrodeposition and gravimetric methods of analysis with 
representative laboratory applications. 

Staff 

CH 215 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 104 

One semester course in volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Includes techniques, stoichio- 
metry and principles of neutralization, oxidation and precipitation methods, and the 
chemistry of representative laboratory determinations. 

Staff 

CH 341, 342 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 212, MA 212 

A presentation of the basic physico-chemical principles with special emphasis on states 
of matter, colligative properties of solutions on nonelectrolytes, surface phenomena and 
colloids, chemical equilibria, atomic structure, and radioactivity. 

Mr. Coots 

CH 401 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 215 

Structure of matter, periodic system, electronic structure and chemical bonding, acids, 
bases, salts, preparation of elements, halogen compounds, hydrides, and carbonyls. 

Messrs. Long, White 

CH 421, 422 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 5 (3.6) f ( 

Prerequisite: CH 212 

Aliphatic and aromatic compounds, methods of preparation, purification and identification 
of compounds; emphasis on structure and mechanism of organic reactions. 

Mr. Reid 

CH 425, 426 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (2.3) f . 

Prerequisite: CH 215 

Structure, preparation, properties and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic substances. 

Mr. Loeppert 



214 Chemistry 

ch 430 organic preparations 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry including organic chemistry 

Experiments selected to acquaint the student with advanced methods and techniques in the 

preparation of organic substances. 

Mr. Loeppert 

CH 451 INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 203 

The fundamental biochemistry of living matter. 

Mr. Satterfield 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 512 (TC 512) CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS 3 (3-0) 

CH 527 ADVANCED SURVEY OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry including organic chemistry 

Underlying principles, interpretation of mechanisms, limitations in the use of organic reactions. 

Mr. Reid 

CH 528 QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry including organic chemistry 

A study of class reactions, functional groups, separation, identification. Preparation of 

derivatives. 

Mr. Reid 

CH 529 QUANTITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry including organic chemistry 

Quantitative determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, the halogens, sulfur and various 

functional groups in organic materials, with emphasis on semimicro methods. 

Mr. Loeppert 

CH 531, 532 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202 

An intensive study of the states of matter, solutions, colloids, homogeneous and hetero- 
geneous equilibrium, reaction kinetics, electrolysis, conductance, oxidation reactions, and 
ionic equilibrium. 

Mr. Sutton 

CH 53 1L, 532L PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202 

Laboratory course to accompany lecture work in physical chemistry. 

Mr. Sutton 

CH 533 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 532 

An intensive study of the structure of atoms and molecules, an introduction to statistics 
and selected subjects in thermodynamics. 

Mr. Sutton 

CH 537 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisite: Three years of Chemistry including CH 532 

Physical methods of chemical analysis, the instruments employed and the theoretical basis 
for their operation. 

Mr. Long 

CH 542 COLLOID CHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 426 

Adsorption, preparation, properties, constitution, stability, and application of sols, gels, 
emulsions, foams and aerosols; dialysis, Donnan membrane equilibrium. 

Mr. White 

CH 543 RADIOISOTOPE PRINCIPLES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202 

A presentation of the basic knowledge of radioactivity, nuclear reactions, ionizing radia- 
tions, and radicchemistry essential to competence in the use of radioisotopes. 

Mr. Coots 

CH 543L RADIOISOTOPE TECHNIQUES 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: CH 543 (prior to or concurrently) 

A laboratory course in the physical and chemical techniques essential to competence in 
the use of radioisotopes. 

Mr. Coots 

CH 551 GENERAL BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 5 (3-6) f 

Prerequisite: CH 422 or equivalent of three years of chemistry 

The chemical constitution of living matter. Biochemical processes as well as compounds are 

studied. 

Mr. Peterson 



Chemistry 215 

ch 552 physiological chemistry 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Digestion, absorption, metabolism, secretions and excretions. Laboratory will include analysis 

of blood and urine. 

Mr. Satterfield 

CH 555 PLANT CHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Composition of plants, properties, nature, and classification of plant constituents, changes 
occuring during growth, ripening and storage of plants of plant products. 

Mr. Sisler 

CH 561 CHEMISTRY OF CARBOHYDRATES AND LIPIDES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CH 422 or equivalent of three years of chemistry 

Classification, composition, distribution, biosynthesis and metabolism of lipides and car- 
bohydrates, analysis, syntheses, deterioration. Physical properties and chemical reactions 
are also considered. 

Staff 

CH 562 CHEMISTRY OF PROTEINS AND NUCLEIC ACIDS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CH 422, CH 551 or equivalent of three years of chemistry 
Composition, distribution, structure, properties and metabolism of amino acids, problems, 
and nucleic acids. 

Staff 

CH 572 CHEMISTRY OF THE VITAMINS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CH 422 or equivalent of three years of chemistry 

History, nomenclature, properties, distribution, effects of deficiencies, vitamin values. 

Mr. Satterfield 

CH 600 RADIOCHEMISTRY 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 543, CH 532 

An advanced presentation of the applications of radioactivity to chemistry and of the 
applications of chemistry to the radio-active elements, particularly the heavy elements and 
fission products. 

Mr. Coots 

CH 601 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 527 

Alicyclic and heterocyclic compounds, macromolecules. Standard type reactions. 

Messrs. Reid, Loeppert, 
Robinson 

CH 602 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 422, 532 

Theoretical and physical aspects of organic chemistry; relations between chemical consti- 
tution and properties; mechanisms of organic reactions. 

Mr. Loeppert 

CH 621 (Al 621) ENZYMES AND INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action, intermediary metabolism of 
carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and prophyrins, metabolic 
energy relationships. 

Mr. Tove 

CH 622 (Al 622) PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL ASSAYS 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: CH 551 or Al 312, St 512 

Techniques and designs of biological assays for vitamins; the interrelationships of logical 
principles, design, and analysis is emphasized. 

Messrs. Carter, Tove 

CH 631 CHEMICAL RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: 40 semester credits in chemistry. Open to all graduates 

Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of 6 semester credits 

is allowed. 

Graduate Staff 

CH 641 SEMINAR Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Required of graduate students specializing in Chemistry 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to chemists 

are reviewed and discussed. A maximum of two semester credits is allowed. 

Graduate Staff 

CH 651 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY Maximum 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Critical study of some special problems in one of the branches of chemistry, involving 

original investigation together with a survey of pertinent literature. 

Graduate Staff 



216 Civil Engineering 

ch 671, 672 advanced physical chemistry 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: CH 532 

The work of 671 will involve a thorough review of the fundamental principles of physical 
chemistry with extension and application of these to the study of the solid state. In 672 
there will be laid down the elements of statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, in terms 
of which certain topics from 671 will be more exhaustively developed. Solution of problems 
will play an important role in 671. 

Mr. Sutton 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 201 SURVEYING I 3 (1-5) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering, Civil Engineering Construction Option, 
Forestry, Geological Engineering and in Landscape Architecture 

Elements of plane surveying; taping, transit, level, stadia, plane table, topograpic survey- 
ing and mapping, care and adjustment of instruments; public land surveys. 

CE 202 SURVEYING II 3 (1-5) s 

Prerequisite: CE 201 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Construction surveys; earthwork computations; route surveys, simple, compound, parabolic 
and special curves; elementary astronomical surveying. 

CE 305, 306 TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING I, II 3 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 

Transportation systems; elements of railroad, highway, traffic and airport engineering; 

physical and mechanical properties of soils that govern their use as engineering materials. 

CE 321 MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY I 2 (1-3) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 311 

Corequisite EM 321 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Properties of cementing materials, mortars, concretes, ceramic products, building stones; 

proportioning mortars and concretes; physical properties and performance characteristics 

of timber, plywood, glued construction and timber fastenings; ASTM standards. 

CE 322 MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY II 2 (1-3) f s 

Corequisite: EM 321 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Properties of structural metals, riveted and welded joints; failures of materials; significance 
of test results; selection of working stresses; field methods for measuring load, deflection 
and strain. 

CE 324 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 
Corequisite EM 321 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Stress analysis of statically determinate beams and framed structures under fixed and mov- 
ing loads; influence line treatment for moving loads; analysis and design of a simple truss. 

CE 338 STRUCTURES I 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: EM 311 

Required of juniors in Architecture 

Analysis of simple structures; reactions, shear and moment diagrams; stresses in members 

of framed structures; graphic statics. 

CE 339 STRUCTURES II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CE 338, EM 321 

Required of juniors in Architecture 

Analysis of indeterminate structures; slopes and deflections; analysis of indeterminate 

frames by moment distribution. 

CE 351 DETAILS OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Required of juniors in heating and air conditioning. 

Structural systems with particular emphasis on location of equipment. 

CE 361 ESTIMATES AND COSTS I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Interpretation of working drawings; analysis of construction plans and specifications; ap- 
proximate and detailed estimates of costs. 



Civil Engineering 217 

ce 362 estimates and costs ii 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 361 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Preparation of complete cost estimates of construction projects; bidding procedures and 

preparation of bids. 

CE 382 HYDRAULICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 312 
Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 

Properties of fluids and mechanics of fluid flow in pipes and open chonnels; theory of de- 
sign and characteristics of pumps and hydraulic motors; measurement of fluid flow. 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 425 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS II 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: CE 324, EM 321 
Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Deflection of beams and trusses; indeterminate stress analysis by moment area slope de- 
flection and moment distribution. 

CE 427 STRUCTURAL DESIGN I 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: EM 321, CE 324 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Analysis and design of reinforced concrete building elements; design of tension, compression 
and simple flexural members of steel and of timber. 

CE 428 STRUCTURAL DESIGN II 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisites: CE 427, CE 425 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Design specifications; connection details; independent and complete design of engineering 

structures. 

CE 429 STRUCTURAL DESIGN III 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Design of tension, compression and flexural elements of steel and timber; solution of prob- 
lems in erection, forms, shoring and falsework. 

CE 442 SOIL MECHANICS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Fundamental stress relations, Mohr's rupture hypothesis, shearing strength, earth pressure 

theories, bearing capacity, stability of slopes, hydrostatics, ond hydrodynamics of ground 

water. 

CE 443 FOUNDATIONS 3 (3-03) s 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Identification and classification of soils; geological aspects of foundation engineering; 
method of investigating subsoil conditions; control of water; types of foundations and con- 
ditions favoring their use; legal aspects of foundation engineering. 

CE 461 PROJECT PLANNING AND CONTROL I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 362 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Analysis of construction plant layout requirements and performance characteristics of 

equipment. 

CE 462 PROJECT PLANNING AND CONTROL II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 461 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Scheduling, analysis and control of construction projects. 

CE 464 LEGAL ASPECTS OF CONTRACTING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option, elective 

Legal aspects of construction contract documents and specifications; owner-engineer-con- 
tractor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract performance; labor laws. 

CE 481 HYDROLOGY AND DRAINAGE 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: CE 382 
Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Occurrence and distribution of rainfall; runoff, surface and ground waters; design of drain- 
age and control structures. 



218 Civil Engineering 

ce 482 water and sewage works 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 
Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Water supply analysis and design, including population estimates, consumption, source se- 
lection aqueducts, distribution systems and pumping stations; elements of water treatment; 
collection and disposal of sewage; elements of sewage treatment. 

CE 485 ELEMENTS OF HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 312 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Elements of fluid mechanics, hydraulics and hydrology, with application to problems in 

construction engineering. 

CE 492, 493 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I, II 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Professional engineering societies and their functions; professional standards; topics of cur- 
rent interest to the civil engineer. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 507 AIRPHOTO ANALYSIS I 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surface drain- 
age characteristics. 

CE 508 AIRPHOTO ANALYSIS II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 507 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs for highway and airport projects. 

CE 509 PHOTOGRAMMETRY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 201 

Elements of photogrammetry as applied to surveying and mapping. Aerial and terrestrial 
photogrammetry. Flight planning and ground controls. Stereoscopy and stereoscopic plotting 
instruments. Measurements on photographs. 

CE 510 ADVANCED SURVEYING 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

State coordinate systems and map projections. Elements of geodetic and astronomical sur- 
veying. Adjustment of observations by the method of least squares. 

CE 514 MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning and city engi- 
neering. 

CE 515 TRANSPORTATION OPERATIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CE 306 

The analysis of traffic and transportation engineering operations. 

CE 516 TRANSPORTATION DESIGN 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 306 

The geometric elements of traffic and transportation engineering design. 

CE 521, 522 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN I, II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: CE 425, CE 428 or equivalent 

Complete structural designs of a variety of projects; principles of limit and prestress design. 

CE 524 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF MASONARY STRUCTURES 3 (3-0) f 

Corequisite: CE 425 

Analysis and design of arches, culverts, dams, foundations and retaining walls. 

CE 531 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Principles and methods of experimental analysis; dimensional analysis; applications to full- 
scale structures. 

CE 532 STRUCTURAL LABORATORY 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Test procedures and limitations and interpretations of experimental results. 

CE 544 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 442 

Subsoil investigations; excavations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of 
water; footing, grillage and pile foundations; caisson and cofferdam methods of con- 
struction; legal aspects of foundation engineering. 



Civil Engineering 219 

ce 547 fundamentals of soil mechanics 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EM 321 

Physical and mechanical properties of soils governing their use for engineering purposes; 

stress relations and applications to a variety of fundamental problems. 

CE 548 SOIL TESTING FOR ENGINEERING PURPOSES 3 to 6 (arrange) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 442 or CE 547 

Qualitative and quantitative soil testing procedures for engineering purposes. 

CE 570 SANITARY MICROBIOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 312 

Dynamics of disinfection and bacteriostasis; microbiology of water and sewage and of 
sewage treatment processes. 

CE 571 THEORY OF WATER AND SEWAGE TREATMENT 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

Study of the physical and chemical principles underlying water and sewage treatment 
processes; diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium and ionization, anoerobic and aerobic 
stabilization processes, sludge conditioning and disposal. 

CE 572 UNIT OPERATIONS AND PROCESSES IN SANITARY ENGINEERING 3 (1-6) i 

Prerequisite: CE 571 

Processes and operations in sanitary engineering; sedimentation, aeration, filtration, adsorp- 
tion, coagulation, softening, sludge digestion, aerobic treatment of sewage. 

CE 573 ANALYSIS OF WATER AND SEWAGE 3 (1-6) f 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Chemical and physical analysis of water and sewage and interpretation of results. 

CE 574 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

Unit operations and processes employed in treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes. 

CE 580 FLOW IN OPEN CHANNELS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 481 

The theory and applications of flow in open channels including dimensional analysis, 
momentum-energy principle, gradually varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, 
spillways, waves, channel transitions and model studies. 

CE 591, 592 CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f > 

Discussions and reports of subjects in civil engineering and allied fields. 

CE 598 CIVIL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 1 to 6 (arrange) f s 

Special projects in some phases of civil engineering. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601 TRANSPORTATION PLANNING 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

The planning, administration, economics and financing of various transportation engineering 

facilities. 

CE 602 ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION DESIGN 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 516 

Design of major traffic and transportation engineering projects. 

CE 603 AIRPORT PLANNING AND DESIGN 3 (2-3) f 

Corequisites: CE 515, 516 

The analysis, planning and design of air transportation facilities. 

CE 604 URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING 3 (2-3) * 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

Thoroughfare planning as related to land usage and urban master-planning. 

CE 621, 622 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Analysis of rigid frames and continuous structures; treatment of redundant members and 
secondary stresses. 

CE 624 THEORY AND DESIGN OF ARCHES, THIN SHELLS AND DOMES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 621; Corequisite: EM 602 

Analysis and design of hinged and rigid arches of both frame ond rib construction; and 
of thin shells and domes. 

CE 626 STRUCTURAL CONNECTIONS 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: CE 621 

Analysis of stresses in simple, rigid and semi-rigid connections; critical review of specifi- 
cations. 



220 Dairy Manufacturing 

CE 641, 642 ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 422 or 

Corequisite: CE 547 

Theories of soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between solids and 

water, and problems in elasticity pertaining to earthwork engineering. 

CE 643 HYDRAULICS OF GROUND WATER 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisite: CE 442 or 547 

Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous media; the 
flow net solution; seppage and well problems. 

CE 671 ADVANCED WATER SUPPLY AND SEWERAGE 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 482 

Problems relating to the design of water supply and sewerage works. 

CE 672 ADVANCED WATER AND SEWAGE TREATMENT 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 482 

Problems relating to the treatment of water and sewage. 

CE 673 INDUSTRIAL WATER SUPPLY AND WASTE DISPOSAL 3 (3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Water requirements of industry and the disposal of industrial wastes. 

CE 674 STREAM SANITATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Biological, chemical and hydrological factors that affect stream sanitation and stream use. 

CE 698 CIVIL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Independent investigation of an advanced civil engineering problem; a report of such an 
investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 



DAIRY MANUFACTURING (ANIMAL INDUSTRY) 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

DM 400 PLANT EXPERIENCE Maximum 6 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of Adviser 

Practice in processing dairy products, including milk, ice cream, cheese, butter and con- 
centrated milks; application of laboratory control; and practice in dairy equipment main- 
tenance. 

Staff 

DM 401 MARKET MILK AND RELATED PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Principles and information on the production, processing, distribution, and public health 

control of fluid milk and related products. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 402 CHEESE 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Principles and practice in the manufacture and curing of various types of cheese; im- 
portance and propagation of cheese starters. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 403 ICE CREAM AND RELATED FROZEN DAIRY FOODS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Choice, preparation and processing of ingredients and freezing of ice cream and other 
frozen desserts. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 404 BUTTER AND DAIRY BY-PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

A study of the fundamentals of buttermaking, and the principles of manufacturing con- 
centrated and dried milks. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 405 DAIRY MECHANICS 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor 

Laboratory practice in the operation and maintenance of dairy plant equipment and re- 
frigeration systems; malfunctions of electrical systems; installation of sanitary milk lines 
and water lines. 

Staff 



Dairy Manufacturing 221 

dm 406 judging dairy products 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Milk and dairy products judging according to official standards and commercial grades. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 407 (BO 407) DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY I 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: BO 312 

Applications of the principles of bacteriology to the production of quality milk and main- 
tenance of quality in processing milk and milk products; various desirable and undesirable 
activities of bacteria in milk; methods of enumerating bacteria; detecting certain groups 
of bacteria of particular importance; and the relationships of bacteria in milk to public 
health. 

Mr. Speck 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DM 501 ADVANCED DAIRY TECHNOLOGY 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisite: DM 401 

The functions and operations of a dairy control laboratory; a comprehensive study of 
methods of analyses of dairy products and related non-dairy products; the application and 
interpretations of methods for quality and composition control of dairy products. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 504 DAIRY PLANT MANAGEMENT 4 (3-2) s 

Prerequisite: DM 401 

Business and factory management practices as used in the dairy plant. 

Mr. Roberts 

DM 506 (BO 506) DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY II 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: DM 407, (BO 407) or equivalent 

A detailed study of bacteria particularly involved in the dairy industry regarding their 
physiology, morphology and cultural characteristics with application to practical dairy farm 
and plant problems. 

Mr. Speck 

DM 508 DAIRY CHEMISTRY 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisites: CH 103 or CH 203, DM 401 

A qualitative study of the physical, colloidal, and chemical properties of milk and its con- 
stituents. 

Mr. Aurand 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DM 601 SEMINAR IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Dairy Manufacturing 

Scientific articles, process reports in research and special problems of interest are reviewed 
and discussed. A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any 
number toward the Doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

DM 602 ADVANCED DAIRY CHEMISTRY 4 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: DM 503 

A quantitative study of the physical, colloidal and chemical properties of milk and its 

constitutents. 

Mr. Aurand 

DM 603 (BO 603) ADVANCED DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY 4 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: DM 506 (BO 506) 

Industrial fermentations used or applicable in the utilization of surplus milk and milk 
products. The student conducts various fermentations and makes the requisite chemical 
and biological measurements in order to determine yields and efficiency of the process. 

Mr. Speck 

DM 604 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 1 to 3 credits per term 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Dairy Manufacturing 

Special problems in various phases of dairy manufacturing. A maximum of six credits is 

allowed. 

Graduate Staff 

DM 605 RESEARCH IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Dairy Manufacturing 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's Degree; no limitation on credits 

in Doctorate programs. 

Graduate Staff 



222 Design 

DESIGN 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



DN 101, 102 DESIGN I, II 3 (3-6) f s 

Required of first year students in the School of Design 

Introduction to the elements and expression of two and three dimensional design involving 
a variety of tools, materials, and techniques. Orientation of historical and contemporary 
concepts of art and architecture. 

Messrs. Baron, Gussow, Macomber, Hertzman, Stuart 

DN 111, 112 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING I, II 2 (0-4) f s 

Required of first year students in the School of Design 

Problems in visual analysis with emphasis on the systems man has devised to describe his 

visual experience. 

Messrs. Bireline, Shaw, Cox 

DN 121, 122 TECHNICAL DRAWING I, II 3 (2-4) f s 

Required of first year students in the School of Design 

Descriptive Geometry and allied technical drawing. Lectures and simple exercises in analyti- 
cal programming of architectural elements. 

Messrs. Buisson, Matsumoto, Shaw, Shawcroft 

DN 211, 212 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING III, IV 2 (0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 112 

Required of second year students in the School of Design 

Problems continuing the studies begun in freshman year with the addition of the study of 

color and its effects. 

Messrs. Cox, Shawcroft 

DN 311, 312 ADVANCED DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING I, II 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 212 

Required of third year students in the School of Design 

Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, and graphics. 

Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Gussow, Stuart 

DN 321, 322 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: HI 245 

Required of all students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

A critical study of architecture from prehistoric times to the present including references 

to landscape architecture, painting, sculpture, and artifacts. 

Mr. Buisson 

DN 411, 412 ADVANCED DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING III, IV 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 312 

Required of fourth year students in the School of Design 

Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, and graphics. 

Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Gussow, Stuart 

DN 421, 422 HISTORY OF DESIGN I, II 3 (3-0) f < 

Prerequisite: HI 246 

Required of all students in Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

Specialized historical studies of design fields. 

Mr. Elliott 

DN 511, 512 ADVANCED DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING V, VI 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 412 

Required of fifth year students in Landscape Architecture and Product Design 
Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, and grahpics. 

Messrs. Bireline, Cox, Gussow, Stuart 

DN 541 SEMINAR ON IDEAS IN DESIGN 2 (2-0) f 

Corequisites: ARC 501, LA 501 or PD 501 

Required of fifth year students in the School of Design 

An introduction to aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to design. 

Mr. Kamphoefner 



Economics 223 

ECONOMICS 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

EC 201, 202 ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Fundamental principles applying to the organization and functioning of our economy. 

EC 205 THE ECONOMIC PROCESS 3 (3-0) f s 

An analysis of the process and principles by which an economy allocates resources, distributes 
goods and income and determines rate of growth. 

EC 301 PRODUCTION AND PRICES 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An intensive study of the functioning of the market economy. An examination of the role 
of prices in determining the allocation of resources, the functioning of the firm in the 
economy, and forces governing the production of economic goods. 

EC 302 NATIONAL INCOME AND ECONOMIC WELFARE 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An intensive examination of factors determining the national income. The economic and 
social effects of the level, composition, and distribution of national income will be studied 
with reference to theories of economic welfare and to public policy. 

EC 305 BUSINESS ORGANIZATION 3 (3-0) f ■ 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A survey of business organization, operation, and practices. Special emphasis is given 
to the forms of business enterprises, principles of management, and the relation of the 
business unit to the economic system. 

EC 310 ECONOMICS OF THE FIRM 3 (3-0) < 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An examination of the economic setting within which the business firm makes decisions, 
and an application of economic analysis to these decisions. Economics from the focal point 
of managerial decision-making. 

EC 312 ACCOUNTING FOR ENGINEERS 3 (3-0) f s 

A survey of accounting principles; the analysis and recording of business transactions; 
financial statements, their construction, use and interpretation. 

EC 315 SALESMANSHIP 2 (2-0) f s 

An introduction to the principles and techniques of selling from the standpoint of the 

individual salesman. A course designed for the technical student anticipating entering the 
field of distribution. 

EC 342 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 3 (3-0) s 

A study of world resources and industries and their relationship to trade and manufacturing. 
Distribution of the principal commodities of world commerce. An analysis of the world's 
important agricultural, industrial, and commercial regions. 

EC 401, 402 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 3 (2-2) f s 

Fundamental principles of accounting theory and practice; the analysis and recording of 

business transactions; explanation and interpretation of the structure, forms and use of 
financial statements. 

EC 407 BUSINESS LAW I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A course dealing with elementary legal concepts, contracts, agency negotiable instruments, 
sales of personal property, chattel mortgages, partnerships, corporations suretyship and 
bailments, insurance. 

EC 408 BUSINESS LAW II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 407 

Deals with real property, mortgages on urban and farm lands, landlord and tenant, re- 
quirements for valid deed, insurance law, wills, suretyship, and conditional sales. 

EC 409 INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCTION COSTS 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: EC 312 

An introduction to accounting problems peculiar to manufacturing fabrication and con- 
struction-type enterprises. Cost determination and allocation of costs for materials, labor, 
and overhead to the various units of product. Estimating and cost control in the production 
and manufacturing process. Special emphasis to be placed on analysis and interpretation 
of cost data. 

EC 410 INDUSTRY STUDIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An analysis of organization, market structure, and competitive behavior in specific in- 
dustries, using the tools or the economist as a guide to pertinent factors and their 
significance. The course will be organized along the lines of intensive but broadly relevant 
case-studies. 



224 Economics 

ec 411 marketing methods 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Marketing institutions and their functions and agencies; retailing; market analysis; problems 

in marketing. 

EC 412 SALES MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EC 411 

Elements of sales management with emphasis on planning, operations, policies and pro- 
grams. 

EC 413 COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND PUBLIC POLICY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. EC 301 recommended but not required 
An analysis of the effect of modern industrial structure on competitive behavior and per- 
formance, in the light of contemporary price theory and the theory of workable competition. 
A critical evaluation of the legislative content, judicial interpretation, and economic effects 
of the antitrust laws. 

EC 414 TAX ACCOUNTING 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 312 or EC 401 

An analysis of the Federal tax laws relating to the individual and business. Determining 
and reporting income. Payroll taxes and methods of reporting them. Actual practice in the 
preparation of income tax returns. 

EC 415 ADVERTISING 2 (2-0) f S 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Principles of advertising; purposes; preparation of copy; media; advertising campaigns; 

legislation. 

EC 420 CORPORATION FINANCE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Financial instruments and capital structure; procuring funds; managing working capital; 
managing corporate capitalization; financial institutions and their work. 

EC 425 INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Principles and techniques of modern scientific management; relation of finance, marketing, 
industrial relations, accounting, and statistics to production; production planning and 
control; analysis of economic, political and social influences on production. 

EC 426 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

The scientific management of manpower, from the viewpoint of the supervisor and the 
personnel specialist. A study of personnel policy and a review of the scientific techniques 
regarding the specific problems of employment, training, promotion, transfer, health and 
safety, employee service, and joint relations. 

EC 431 LABOR PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing . 

An economic approach to labor problems including wages, hours, working conditions, in- 
security, substandard workers, minority groups, social security, and public policy relative 
to these problems. 

EC 432 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Collective bargaining. Analysis of basic labor law and its interpretation by the courts and 
governmental agencies. An examination of specific terms of labor contracts and their 
implications for labor and management. An examination of labor objectives and tactics 
and management objectives and tactics. Problems of operating under the labor contract. 

EC 440 ECONOMICS OF GROWTH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An examination of the institutional background required for national economic development. 
The conditions apparent for past growth of nations are compared with conditions ob- 
taining in presently retarded nations. Conclusions are drawn from this comparison to pro- 
vide an introduction to the theoretical models of growth. 

EC 442 EVOLUTION OF ECONOMIC IDEAS 3 (3-0) i s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An analysis of the development of economic thought and method during the past two 

centuries. Economics considered as a cumulative body of knowledge, in a context of 

emerging technology, changing institutions, pressing new problems, and the growth of 

science. 

EC 444 ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A comparative analysis of the functioning of the major economic systems, with emphasis 
upon the ways in which the problem of economic calculation is approached in a variety of 
institutional settings. 

EC 446 ECONOMIC FORECASTING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205. EC 302 recommended but not required 

An examination of the basic principles and techniques of economic forecasting with 
strong emphasis upon the economic models upon which forecasting is based. 



Economics 225 

ec 448 international economics 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A study of international economics, including trade, investment, monetary relations, and 
certain aspects of economic development. Emphasis upon analytical and policy approaches, 
although some institutional material is included. 

EC 450 ECONOMIC DECISION PROCESSES 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212 

An analysis of processes for decision making by individuals and groups. Linear program- 
ming, probability, and game theory in the light of a general theory of decision. 

EC 461 (HI 461 or PS 461) THE SOVIET UNION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: One semester of Economics and PS 201 or HI 205 or acceptable substitute 
An analysis of the structure and function of the major Soviet economic, political and 
social institutions with special stress on the historical roots and continuity of Russian civiliza- 
tion. The course is presented in three equal phases of approximately five weeks each, 
covering Russian history, Soviet government and Soviet economy. 

EC 490 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

The terminal course in undergraduate study of economics. The student is assisted in 
summarizing his training, and in improving his capacity to recognize problems and to 
select logically consistent means of solving the problems. This is done on a small-group and 
individual basis. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EC 501 (A6C 501) INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 301 or AGC 212 or equivalent 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and of market behavior, including 
demand, costs and production, pricing under competitive conditions, and pricing under 
monopoly and other imperfectly competitive conditions. 

EC 502 MONEY, INCOME, AND EMPLOYMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 302 or EC 501 or equivalent 

A study of the methods and concepts of national income analysis with particular reference 
to the role of monetary policy in maintaining full employment without inflation. 

EC 503 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205, EC 401, EC 402 

Problems of asset valuation, such as depreciation, replacements, amortization, etc., as 

found in all types of business organizations: branch accounting, consolidations, installment 

selling. 

EC 504, 505 PRINCIPLES OF COST ACCOUNTING 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205, EC 401, EC 402 

Cost finding, materials costs, labor costs, overhead costs, etc., with an introduction to stand- 
ard cost procedures. 

EC 510 (PS 510) PUBLIC FINANCE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending, and borrowing, 
including intergovernmental relationships and administrative practices and problems. 

EC 515 INVESTMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Types of investment; investment market; investment analysis; investment channels; invest- 
ment fluctuations; investment policies and practices. 

EC 525 MANAGEMENT POLICY AND DECISION MAKING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: 9 hours in Economics and Related Courses and consent of the instructor 
A review and consideration of modern management processes used in making top-level 
policies and decisions. An evaluation of economic, social and institutional pressures, and 
of the economic and non-economic motivations, which impinge upon the individual and 
the organization. The problem of coordinating the objectives and the mechanics of 
management is examined. 

EC 531 MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 3 (3-0) t s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of the instructor 

A seminar course designed to round out the technical student's program. Includes a survey 
of the labor movement organization and structure of unions, labor law and public policy, 
the union contract and bargaining process, and current trends and tendencies in the field 
of collective bargaining. 



226 Economics 

ec 550 mathematical models in economics 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212. EC 450 recommended but not required 
An introductory study of economic models emphasizing their formal properties. The theory 
of individual economic units is presented as a special case in the theory of inductive be- 
havior. Mathematical discussions of the theory of the consumer, the theory of the firm, 
and welfare economics will show the relevance of such topics as constrained maxima and 
minima, set theory, partially and simply ordered systems, probability theory, and game 
theory to economics. 

EC 552 ECONOMETRICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212, ST 361 

An analysis of methods for economic inference. Multi-equation economic models: their 
specification, identification, and estimation. 

EC 555 LINEAR PROGRAMMING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212, MA 405 

Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation, and organization. Optimal 
combination of integrated productive processes within the firm. Applications in the 
economics of industry and of agriculture. 

EC 590, 591 SEMINAR IN SPECIAL ECONOMIC TOPICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Topics presented by a visiting professor or special lecturer. This course will be offered from 
time to time as distinguished visiting scholars are available. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EC 601 ADVANCED ECONOMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: EC 501 or equivalent 

A rigorous examination of contemporary microeconomic theory. 

EC 602 (AGC 602) MONETARY AND EMPLOYMENT THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 502 or equivalent 

The course consists of an analysis of the forces determining the level of income and em- 
ployment; a review of some of the theories of economic fluctuations; and a critical examina- 
tion of a selected macroeconomic system. 

EC 603 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EC 442 or EC 501 or EC 502 or equivalent 

A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic thought, designed 
in part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate perspective for the understanding 
of contemporary economics. 

EC 605 RESEARCH IN ECONOMICS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Individual research in economics, under staff supervision and direction. 

EC 640 THEORY OF ECONOMIC GROWTH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 440 or EC 502 or equivalent 

Several theoretical models of economic growth are compared and analyzed. Contemporary 
developments in the theory of national economic growth are studied and evaluated for 
consistency with older theories. 

EC 648 THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE 3 (3-0) t s 

Prerequisite: EC 448 or EC 501 or equivalent 

A consideration, on a seminar basis, of the specialized body of economic theory dealing 
with the international movement of goods, services, capital, and payments. Also, a 
theoretically-oriented consideration of policy. 

EC 650 ECONOMIC DECISION THEORY 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent, EC 550 or EC 555 

Study of general theories of choice. Structure of decision problems; the role of information; 
formulation of objectives. Current research problems. 

EC 655 TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 501 or equivalent, EC 550 or EC 555 

A seminar and research course devoted to recent literature and developments in mathema- 
tical economics. 

EC 665 ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ORGANIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or equivalent, consent of instructor 

This seminar will apply methods and findings derived from the behavioral sciences to the 
economic behavior of the organization, particularly the business firm. Among the ap- 
proaches which may be utilized are organization theory, information theory, reference 
group theory, and decision theory. 



Education 227 



EDUCATION 



ED 100 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f 

The place of vocational education in a program of public education and the fundamental 
principles upon which this work is based. 

ED 102 OBJECTIVES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 1 0-0) I 

Designed to help the student understand the purpose of Agricultural Education at N. C. 
State College. Also provides an opportunity for students to develop an understanding of 
purposes of vocational agriculture in the school community. 

Staff 

ED 201 FARMING PROGRAMS AND FFA 2 (2-0) s 

Provides an opportunity for students to get an understanding of the place of farming pro- 
grams and FFA in vocational agriculture, as well as the role of the teacher in these pro- 

flramS - Staff 

ED 203 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 2 (2-0) s 

A course designed to aid prospective teachers in becoming familiar with the scope and 
purposes of secondary education, the qualification and responsibilities of teachers, the rela- 
tion of the school to the community, and current problems of secondary school teachers. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 308 VISUAL AIDS L 2 (1-2) $ 

Methods and techniques of visual instruction; lettering; statistical illustration; chart, graph 
ond poster-making; photography; projector operation, care and use. 

Staff 

ED 313 TEACHING RURAL PEOPLE 2 (2-0) s 

The purpose of the course is to give the student an understanding of the basic principles 
involved in the teaching-learning process. The course will be built around problem experiences 
of farm people with principles of teaching and learning related to these experiences. 

Staff 

ED 344 SECONDARY EDUCATION 2 (1-2) it 

An overview of secondary education, including development, problems, services, trends, 
teaching profession, role of school in the community, purposes and objectives. The develop- 
ment and status of secondary education in North Carolina is taken up. 

Mr. Shannon 

ED 410 DRIVER EDUCATION . 3 (2-2) s 

Summer session only 

The principles of teaching basic driving skills, including the new concept of defensive driv- 
ing, observance and interpretation of motor vehicle laws, adverse driving conditions, handling 
of accident situations and care of the car. 

Mr. Crawford 

ED 411 STUDENT TEACHING IN AGRICULTURE 6 (3-12) # 

The first part of the semester (usually six weeks) will be on campus. The remainder of the 
semester will be spent in a high school department of vocational agriculture doing full- 
time student teaching. The student will get experience in all phases of the vocational agri- 
culture program, including community study, adult education, home supervision. The student 
teacher will be supervised by the local teacher of agriculture and a member of the staff in 
Agricultural Education. 
y Staff 

ED 412 TEACHING ADULTS IN AGRICULTURE 2 (1-2) f 

Principles of effective teaching applied to adult and young farmers. Experience in organiz- 
ing and conducting groups for discussion of local problems. 

Staff 

ED 413 TEACHING MATERIALS 2 (1-2) f 

Developing and using teaching materials for more effective instruction. Experience in this 
area with adult and high school classes. 

Staff 

ED 420 PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE 2 (2-0) f s 

This is a course designed to provide basic principles of guidance for teachers, teacher-coun- 
selors, administrators, and others in the school, as well as workers in other areas such as 
the community agency, business, industry, group work and the like. 

Among the topics covered are need for guidance, bases of guidance services; programs of 
studying the individual; counseling for educational, vocational, social, and personal prob- 
lems; group procedures in guidance. Emphasis is on the practical application of guidance 
principles and procedures. 

Mr. Morehead 



228 Education 

ed 422 methods of teaching industrial subjects 4 (4-0) s 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 . . 

A study of effective methods and techniques of teaching industrial subjects. Emphasis is 
given to class organization; student-teacher planning; methods of teaching manipulative 
skills and related information; lesson planning; shop safety; and evaluation. Teaching prob- 
lems will be studied and analyzed following directed observations in the public schools. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 440 VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

A comprehensive study of the types of vocational education of less than college grade, 
provided for through Federal legislation; an evaluation of the effectiveness of the program; 
and a detailed study of the North Carolina Plan. 

Staff 

ED 444 STUDENT TEACHING IN INDUSTRIAL SUBJECTS 6 (2-15) f 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

Students in the Industrial Arts and Industrial Education curricula will devote ten weeks 
during the fall semester to full time, off-campus student teaching in selected public schools 
throughout the State. They will be assigned to their teaching center in the preceding 
spring and will report to their supervising teachers when the public schools (to which they 
are assigned) open in the fall. During the remainder of the term, additional courses will 
be taken in concentrated form. 

Staff 

ED 470 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) f 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices appropriate 
for teachers of mathematics at the secondary level. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 471 STUDENT TEACHING IN MATHEMATICS 6 (2-15) f s 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity to get ex- 
perience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching mathematics. Each student dur- 
ing the senior year will spend one quarter off-campus in a selected center. In addition to 
acquiring the necessary competencies for teaching mathematics, the student teachers will 
also have an opportunity to become familiar with the total school program and to partici- 
pate in as many community activities as time will permit during the period of student 
teaching. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 472 DEVELOPING AND SELECTING TEACHING MATERIALS IN MATHEMATICS 

2 (2-0) f s 
Developing and selecting teaching materials in keeping with the new and changing concepts 
of the content and emphasis in high school mathematics is essential for mathematics 
teachers. The course will follow the class discussion and demonstration pattern. Students 
will study the latest instructional materials and discover or devise materials and aids for 
increasing the effectiveness of the content and instruction in high school mathematics. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 475 METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices appropriate 
for teachers of physical and natural science at the secondary level. 

Mr. Shannon 

ED 476 STUDENT TEACHING IN SCIENCE 6 (2-15) f s 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity to get ex- 
perience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching science. Each student during the 
senior year will spend one quarter off-campus in a selected center. In addition to acquiring 
the necessary competencies for teaching science, the student teacher will also have an 
opportunity to become familiar with the total school program and to participate in as 
many community activities as time will permit during the period of student teaching. 

Mr. Shannon 

ED 477 DEVELOPING AND SELECTING TEACHING MATERIALS IN SCIENCE 2 (2-0) f s 
Developing and selecting teaching materials in keeping with the new and changing concepts 
of the content and emphasis in high school science, particularly the experimental and 
laboratory approach to science teaching. Students will study the latest instructional ma- 
terials and discover or devise materials and aids for increasing the effectiveness of the 
content and instruction in high school science courses. 

Mr. Shannon 

ED 482 CURRICULUM PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six credits in Education 

Approximately one-third of the course is directed to developing a working philosophy of 
industrial arts and the major portion of the course is devoted to planning and organizing 
learning units in industrial arts. 

Mr. Young 

ED 483 INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS AND DEVICES 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six credits in Education 

Analysis of learning units and the preparation of instructional aids and devices. 

Messrs. Hostetler, Young 



Education 229 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 501 EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 3 (2-2) f 

Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child with major in- 
terest on the mentally handicapped and slow learner. 

Practice will be given in curriculum instruction for groups of children, individual techniques 
for dealing with retarded children in the average classroom. Opportunity for individual 
work with an exceptional child will be provided. 

Mr. Corter 

ED 502 ANALYSIS OF READING ABILITIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Education or Psychology 

A study of tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of reading retarda- 
tion and factors underlying reading difficulties. 

Mr. Rust 

ED 503 IMPROVEMENT OF READING ABILITIES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Education or Psychology 

A study of methods used in developing specific reading skills or in overcoming certain 
reading difficulties; a study of methods used in developing pupil vocabularies and word 
analysis skills; a study of how to control vocabulary burden of reading material. 

Mr. Rust 

ED 505 GROUP DYNAMICS IN TEACHING 3 

Summer session 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Education or Psychology 

A study of group methods in teaching with special reference in role playing, conference 
techniques, and group dynamics in their application to teaching and an understanding of 
the student's behavior. 

Staff 

ED 509 WORKSHOP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION Maximum 6 credits 

Summer session 

Prerequisite: ED 501 and six hours in Psychology 

The workshop in Special Education provides opportunity for group projects in all aspects of 
special education, and group participation in development of individual projects. Public re- 
lations, library facilities, occupational surveys, methods and materials, development of new 
programs, units of work and room planning are examples of projects. Project materials are 
collected, mimeographed, and distributed to class members to serve as a handbook for 
future use. Materials are frequently tried out in the practicum. Specific subject matter areas 
to meet formal certification requirements for special education are also taught in small 
groups. 

Mr. Corter 

ED 510 ADVANCED DRIVER EDUCATION 3 (2-2) 

Summer session 

Prerequisite: ED 410 

The study of course content in present day driver education courses: Evaluation of research 
literature in driver education; a study of existing driver education programs at both sec- 
ondary and college levels; and evaluation of psychological and educational research in 
accidents. 

Mr. Crawford 

ED 516 COMMUNITY OCCUPATIONAL SURVEYS 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: Six credits in Education and consent of instructor 

Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of findings in planning 
a program of vocational education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 521 ORGANIZATION OF RELATED STUDY MATERIALS 2 (2-0) f s 

The principles of selecting and organizing both technical and general related instructional 
material for trade extension and diversified occupations classes. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 524 OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION 3 (0-3) 

Prerequisites: 6 hours of Education or Psychology, ED 420 or equivalent 

This course is designed to prepare teachers, counselors, business and industrial personnel 
workers, placement workers, and others to collect evaluate, and use occupational and edu- 
cational information. In addition to the study of the usual sources and types of published 
occupational information, attention will be given to collection of occupational information 
locally, preparation of the occupational monograph, analysis of job requirements and worker 
characteristics, occupational trends and factors affecting trends, occupational and industrial 
structure and classification, and the like. Imparting occupational information to groups 
and individuals by techniques such as the following are considered: the occupations unit in 
social studies and other courses, the occupations course, home-room activities, introducing 
occupational information informally in subject matter courses, the resource file, vocational 
counseling. 

Mr. Morehead 



230 Education 

ed 525 trade analysis and course construction 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of determining teaching 
content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organization based on occu- 
pational analysis covering instruction in skills and technology and including course outlines, 
job sequences, the development of industrial materials and instructional schedules. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 526 SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Maximum 2 credits 

Summer session 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor 

Reviews and reports on topics of special interest to graduate students in Industrial Educa- 
tion. The course will be offered from time to time in accordance with the availability of 
distinguished professors. 

Mr. Hanson 

ED 527 PHILOSOPHY OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

A presentation of the historical development of industrial education; the philosophy of vo- 
cational education; study of Federal and State legislation pertaining to vocational education; 
types of programs, trends and problems. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 528 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN DIVERSIFIED OCCUPATIONS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

A study of the development, the objectives, and principles of diversified occupations. The 
organization, promotion and management of programs in this area of vocational education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 530 GROUP GUIDANCE 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: 6 hours of education or psychology, ED 420 or equivalent 
This course is designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators, and others who work 
with groups or who are responsible for group guidance activities, to understand the theory 
and principles of effective group work, to develop skill in using specific guidance techniques, 
and to plan and organize group activities in the secondary school and other institutions. 
The relationship of group activities to counseling and other aspects of guidance services 
is considered. Methods of evaluating and improving group guidance activities are taken up. 

Mr. Morehead 

ED 531 INTRODUCTION TO VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: 6 hours from following fields — Economics, Education, Psychology or Sociology 
This course will serve as an introduction to the broad field of rehabilitation services and 
programs directed toward the restoration of physically and/or mentally disabled persons 
into employment. The course will emphasize the State-Federal, and private agency programs. 
It will be interdisciplinary in its approach covering the areas of social work, medicine, 
psychology, sociology, and economics. Specialists or appropriate persons in the above areas 
will be invited to participate. Field trips to agencies will be required. 

Mr. Anderson 

ED 532 MEDICAL INFORMATION FOR REHABILITATION COUNSELORS 3 (3-1) f 

Prerequisite: Advance graduate standing 

This course is designed for vocational rehabilitation counselors and other workers in re- 
habilitation. The course will provide counselors with the necessary background in medical 
information and terminology so that they can understand and interpret medical information 
in the integrated rehabilitation process. The course will consist of lectures by medical spe- 
cialists who will present the methods of diagnosis, treatment, and the rehabilitation aspects 
of disabling conditions. Visits will be made to clinics. 

Mr. Anderson 

ED 533 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE SERVICES 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, ED 420 or equivalent 

This course is designed for school guidance workers and those preparing for this field. Basic 
principles and current practices employed in developing, organizing, administering, and sup- 
ervising guidance services in the elementary and secondary school will be studied. Inter- 
relationship of guidance services with instruction, administrative relationships, utilization of 
school staff, and evaluaton of guidance services will be considered. 

Mr. Morehead 

ED 522 INDUSTRIAL ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 (Summer session) 

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in Education and consent of instructor 

This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals understand how tools 
and materials and industrial processes may be used to vitalize and supplement the elemen- 
tary school children's experiences. Practical children's projects along with the building of 
classroom equipment. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 554 PLANNING PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 41 1 

Consideration of the community as a unit for planning programs in agricultural education; 
objectives and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory groups; school and 
community relationships; organization of the department and use of facilities. 

Messrs. Scarborough, Miller 



Education 231 

ED 558 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN TEACHING Moximum 6 credits 

Prerequisite: ED 41 1 

Current problems in agricultural education. Opportunities for students to study particular 

problems under the guidance of the staff. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 563 EFFECTIVE TEACHING 3 (3.0) f , 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course approaches; 
identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; evaluation of 
teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective teaching. 

Messrs. Beard, Scarborough 

ED 568 ADULT EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE 3 (3.0) f < 

Prerequisite: ED 411 v ; 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers as leaders in adult education. More 
emphasis is being given to working with adults as part of the community program of vo- 
cational agriculture. This course will give the teacher an opportunity to study some of the 
basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Particular attention will be given 
to the problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the high school program 
of vocational agriculture, as well as to methods of teaching adults. 

Messrs. Beam, Scarborough 

ED 590 INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN GUIDANCE 3 (3-0) f , 

Prerequisites: 6 hours graduate work in Department or equivalent 

Intended for individual or group studies of one or more of the major problems in guidance 
and personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet the interests of individuals. The 
workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects and reports will be developed by 
individuals and by groups. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead 

ED 595 INDUSTRIAL ARTS WORKSHOP 3 (Summer session) 

Prerequisite: One or more years of teaching experience. 

A course for experienced teachers, administrators, and supervisors of industrial arts. The 
primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, conducting 
and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical 
experiences and will do intensive research work on individual and group problems 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 610 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f s 
Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, ED 420, ED 440 or equivalent 

Administrative and supervisory problems of vocational education; practices and policies of 
Federal and State officers; organization and administration of city and consolidated systems. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 614 MODERN PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f s 
Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

Foundations of modern programs of secondary education; purposes, curriculum, organization, 
administration, and the place and importance of the high school in the community in rela- 
tion to contemporary social force. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 615 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

An introductory course for students preparing for on advanced degree. The purposes are to 
assist the student in understanding the meaning and purpose of educational research and 
the research approach to problems; to develop students' ability to identify educational 
problems, and to plan and carry out research to solve these problems; to aid in the prep- 
aration of the research report. Special attention is given to tools and methods of research. 
Consideration is also given to the educator as a consumer of research. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 616 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 558 ; 

Group study in current and advanced problems in the teaching and administration of agri- 
cultural education; evaluation of procedures and consideration for improving. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 617 PHILOSOPHY OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 554 

An examination of current educational philosophies and their relation to agricultural educa- 
tion. Principles and practices involved in the leadership of a teacher of agriculture and in 
making his work effective in a rural community. Study of leaders in the field. 

Mr. Scarborough 

ED 618 SEMINAR IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Maximum 2 credits 

A critical review of current problems, articles, and books of interest to students of agricul- 
tural education. 

Graduate Staff 



232 Education 

ed 619 seminar in industrial arts education 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Presentation of current literature in the field of Industrial Arts Education; review and dis- 
cussion of student papers and research problems. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 621 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Maximum 6 credits 

Individual direction in research on a specific problem of concern to the student. Generally, 
the student is preparing his thesis or research problem. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 624 RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION Maximum 6 credits f s 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education, permission of instructor 

The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research problems and in the 
organization of the problems, methods of gathering data, procedure for analyzing data, and 
the best practice for interpreting and reporting data. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 627 RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Maximum 6 credits f s 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education, permission of instructor 

The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research problems and in the 
organization of the problems, methods of gathering data, procedure for analyzing data, and 
best practice for interpreting and reporting data. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 630 PHILOSOPHY OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

Required of all graduate students in Industrial Arts Education. Current and historical de- 
velopments in industrial arts; philosophical concepts, functions, scope, criteria for the selec- 
tion and evaluation of learning experiences, laboratory organization, student personnel 
programs, community relationships, teacher qualifications, and problems confronting the 
industrial arts profession. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 631 EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: 9 hours from following fields — Economics, Education, Psychology or Sociology 
This course aims to provide training for teachers who are part-time or full-time counselors, 
employment interviewers, social workers and personnel workers, who are aiding individuals 
with vocational adjustment problems. The course will cover the functions preformed in 
vocational and educational guidance such as assembling and imparting occupational infor- 
mation, counseling regarding vocational and educational plans, the use of aptitude tests, 
placement in jobs and follow-up, and procedures in setting up services of vocational and 
educational guidance in schools, employment offices, and social service agencies. 

Mr. Anderson 

ED 633 TECHNIQUES IN GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: 9 hours from following fields — Economics, Education, Psychology or Sociology 
This course is designed to aid personnel workers in secondary schools, colleges, employment 
offices, and social agencies to develop an understanding and to develop skill in using various 
guidance and personnel techniques. Some of the techniques to be studied intensively are: 
anecdotal reports, rating scales, observation, records and reports, sociograms, interviewing, 
counseling and case study procedures. Students will become acquainted with these techniques 
through lectures, demonstrations, and the study of case histories. Attention will be given to 
both diagnosis and treatment. 

Mr. Anderson 

ED 635 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

A study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision in the improve- 
ment of industrial arts in the public schools. Selection of teachers and their improvements 
in service and methods of evaluating industrial arts programs. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 641 FIELD WORK IN OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 2 to 6 f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

A practicum course in which the student undertakes field work in secondary schools, colleges, 
social service agencies, employment office, and industrial establishments which carry on 
guidance and personnel work. The student may observe and participate in some personnel 
service and may study the organization and administration of the programs. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead 

ED 651 RESEARCH IN OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE Maximum 

6 credits f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

Qualified students will conduct investigations and research in guidance and personnel. Pub- 
lished reports and techniques in investigation will be analyzed and evaluated. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead 

ED 664 SUPERVISION IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 563 

Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of present supervisory 
practice; theory, principles and techniques of effective supervision in agricultural education 
at different levels. 



Electrical Engineering 233 

Messrs. Kirkland, Scarborough 
ED 665 SUPERVISING STUDENT TEACHING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Education 

A study of the program of student teaching in teacher education. Special consideration will 
be given the role of the supervising teacher including the following areas: planning for ef- 
fective student teaching, observation and orientation, school community study, analysis of 
situation, evaluating student teachers, and coordination with State College. 

Graduate Staff 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 201 ELEMENTARY CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 4 (2-5) f s 

Corequisite: MA 201 
Required for sophomores in EE 

Fundamental laws of electric circuits, magnetic circuits, ond simple circuit transients. Prob- 
lem drill and laboratory exercises. 

Mr. Bell, Staff 

EE 202 ELEMENTARY CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 4 (2-5) s 

Prerequisite: EE 201, MA 201 
Required of sophomores in EE 

A continuation of EE 201. Introduction to steady-state alternating-current circuit theory, 
fundamental laws of magnetic fields and electric fields. Problem drill and laboratory exer- 
cises. 

Mr. Bell, Staff 

EE 301, 302 INTERMEDIATE CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 4 (2-5) f 

3 (2-2) s 
Prerequisites: EE 202, PY 202, MA 202 
Required of juniors in EE 

An intermediate treatment of lumped-constant alternating-current circuits in the steady 
state. Single-and three-phase circuits. Discussion of electric and magnetic fields, distributed 
constants, and traveling waves. The theory of transmission lines at power and audio fre- 
quencies. Filters and impedance matching. Gne three-hour laboratory per week is included 
in the first semester. 

Mess r s. Stevenson, Goetze, Staff 

EE 305 ELECTRICAL MACHINERY 4 (2-5) f t 

Prerequisite: EE 202 

Required of juniors in EE 

A classroom and laboratory study of the principles, performance, ond characteristics of 

direct current and alternating current machinery. 

Mr. Goetze, Staff 

EE 306 ELECTRICAL MACHINERY 

Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 305 

A continuation of EE 305 into more advanced phases of the theory of alternating- and 

direct-current machinery. 

Mr. Goetze 

EE 310 ILLUMINATION 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: EE 301 or EE 320 or EE 331 

A classroom and laboratory study of the principles involved in the production ond utilization 
of light from artificial sources. - a study of the requirements for good lighting; and design 
of lighting installations for schools and industry. Two hours recitation and one three-hour 
laboratory or problem period per week. 

Mr. Winkler 

EE 320 ELEMENTS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 202 

Required of seniors in MEA, AGE, MIC, CHE, MIG, CE, and NE 

Principles, characteristics, and operation of electric equipment and systems. Theory and 
problems in applied electricity, motor characteristics, industrial applications, and electronics. 

Staff 

EE 331, 332 PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 202 
Required of seniors in EPY, IE, and ME 

Basic concepts, electrical power generation and utilization circuit elements, single and 
polyphase a.c. circuits, transformers, rotating electrical machines. Fundamentals of Elec- 
tronics and control circuits. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour recitation of labor- 
atory per week. 

Staff 



234 Electrical Engineering 

ee 350 electrical applications in wood products manufacturing 3 (2-3) 

Prerequisites: PY 211, PY 212 

Required of juniors in Pulp and Paper Technology curriculum 
Optional for juniors or seniors in Furniture Manufacturing and Management 
A study of electrical power applications in the pulp and paper industries, and in furniture 
manufacturing. Includes a.c. and d.c. circuits; single phase and polyphase power and 
energy measurements; d-c and a-c motors. Two hours recitation and one three-hour labora- 
tory or problem per week. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 411 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering 

Weekly meetings for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics of current 

interest in Electrical Engineering. 

Staff 

EE 414 ELECTRONICS 4 (2-5) s 

Prerequisites: EE 301, PY 407 
Required of juniors in EE 

A study of the fundamentals of electrical conduction in vacuum, gases, and solids. Operat- 
ing characteristics of vacuum and gaseous tubes, mercury arc rectifiers, photoelectric cells, 
cathode-ray tubes and solid state devices. Introduction to electronic circuit theory. One lab- 
oratory period a week illustrates the theory covered during lecture and recitation periods. 

Mr. Thompson 

EE 430 ESSENTIALS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 4 (3-3) 

Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 332 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

Essential theory of electric circuits, including electron tubes, solid state devices, transformers 

and rotating machines as needed to supply the electrical background for instrumentation 

and control theory. Intended primarily for graduate students who do not have an electrical 

engineering undergraduate degree. 

Mr. Manning 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 501 ADVANCED CIRCUITS AND FIELDS I 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, MA 301 

Required of seniors in EE 

Transient analysis of electric circuits by the Laplace transform method. The study of 

transient and sinusoidal steady-state response in terms of poles and zeros of network 

functions. 

Mr. Stevenson 

EE 502 ADVANCED CIRCUITS AND FIELDS II 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: EE 302, HA 301 

Required of seniors in EE 

A study of classical electric and magnetic field theory and its application to the problems 

of electrical engineering. Consideration of electrostatics, magnetostatics, radiation, and 

quided waves, using vector methods. 

Mr. Mott 

EE 511 ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 3 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 414 
Departmental elective for seniors 

Comprehensive coverage of circuits and equipment using electronic devices; variable fre- 
quency effects; amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, detectors, wave-shaping circuits, genera- 
tors of non-linear waveforms; basic pulse techniques; principles of electronic analogue 
computers. Emphasis on quantitative analysis and engineering design. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 512 COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING 3 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: EE 51 1 

Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

Application of electronic circuits and equipment to radio and wire communication systems. 
Elements of complete systems, wave propagation, antennas, transmitters, receivers, televi- 
sion, radar, electronic navigation systems, noise, special applications. 

Mr. Barclay 



Electrical Engineering 235 

ee 513 electric power engineering 3 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 305 
Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

A study of industrial power supply and power factor correction; direct and alternating cur- 
rent motor characteristics, starting methods, dynamic braking and speed control; motor ap- 
plications, and industrial control apparatus. 

Mr. Bell 

EE 514 POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS 3 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 305 
Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

Analysis of problems encountered in the long-distance transmission of electric power. Line 
parameters by the method of geometric mean distances. Circle diagrams, symmetrical com- 
ponents, and fault calculations. Elementary concepts of power svstem stabiliyt. Applications 
of digital computers to power-system problems. 

Mr. Stevenson 

EE 515 ELEMENTS OF CONTROL 3 credit hours 

Prerequisites: EE 414, EE 305 
Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

Introductory theory of open and closed loop control. Functions and performance require- 
ments of typical control systems and system components. Dynamic analysis of error detectors, 
amplifiers, motors, demodulators, analogue components and switching devices. Component 
transfer characteristics and block diagram representation. 

Mr. Peterson 

EE 516 FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 501, EE 515 

Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

Study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as voltage, 

speed and mechanical position. Theory of regulating systems and servo-mechanisms. Steady 

state and transient responses. Evaluation of stability. Transfer function loci and root locus 

plots. Analysis using differential equation and operational methods. System compensation 

and introduction to design. 

Mr. Peterson 

EE 517 CONTROL LABORATORY 1 (0-3) s 

Corequisite: EE 516 

Laboratory study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as 
voltage, speed and mechanical position. Characteristics of regulating systems and servo- 
mechanisms. The laboratory work is intended to contribute to an understanding of the 
theory developed in EE 516, Feedback Control Systems. 

Mr. Peterson 

EE 518 INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL IN NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY 3 (3-3) • 

Prerequisites: EE 430 or EE 301, EE 305, EE 414, MA 301 

Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

Radiation detectors, pulse amplifiers, pulse shapers, amplitude discriminators, counters, 

coincidence circuits, reactor kinetics reactor simulators, automatic control of reactors. 

Mr. Manning 

EE 520 FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 414 or EE 430 
Departmental elective for seniors in EE 

The basic theory of digital computation and control. Introduction to number systems, data 
handling, relay algebra, switching logic, memory circuits, the application of electronic de- 
vices to switching circuits, and the design of computer control circuits. 

Mr. Bell 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 



EE 605, 606 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f * 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in EE 

A series of papers and conferences participated in by the instructiono: staff, invited guests, 
and students who are candidates for advanced degrees. 

Graduate Staff 

EE 611, 612 ELECTRIC NETWORK SYNTHESIS 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: EE 501 

A study of modern network theory, with the emphasis on synthesis, based on the work of 
Brune, Bode, Quillemin Bott and Duffin, Darlington, Foster and many others. Both the real- 
ization problem and the approximation problem will be treated. 

Mr. Hoadley 



236 Electrical Engineering 

ee 613 advanced feedback control 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 516 

An advanced study of feedback systems for the control of physical variables. Analysis of 
follower systems and regulators. Mathematical and graphical description of systems. Stability 
theory and performance criteria. Frequency response and root locus methods of analysis. 
System compensation and design. Introductory analysis of non-linear systems. 

Mr. Peterson 

EE 615 ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: EE 502 

Maxwell's Equations applied to a study of the propagation of energy by electromagnetic 
waves. Vector and scalar potentials, retarded potentials, reflection and refraction, power 
flow and energy density; plane, rectangular and cylindrical wave guides; lines and cavity 
resonators. Laboratory on microwave techniques and measurements. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 616 MICROWAVE ENGINEERING 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Analysis and design of microwave devices and systems. Theory and application of klystrons, 
magnetrons, traveling-wave tubes, masers, parametric amplifiers, and other modern high- 
frequency devices. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 617 PULSE SWITCHING AND TIMING CIRCUITS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: EE 501, EE 512 

Tube and transistor circuit techniques for the production, shaping, and control of nonsin- 
usoidal wave forms. Fundamental circuits needed in pulse information systems, instrumenta- 
tion, and computers. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 618 RADIATION AND ANTENNAS 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Electromagnetic wave theory applied to antennas and antenna arrays. Calculation and 
measurement of directional characteristics and field intensity. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 621 VACUUM ELECTRON DEVICES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

An intensive analytic study of the laws of electron emission and motion in electron tubes. 
Poisson's equation and conformal transformations are used to develop design criteria and 
formulae. Emission, space charge, beam formation and focussing, noise, tube parameters 
and ratings and construction techniques. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 637 CIRCUIT ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EE 514 

An advanced treatment of symmetrical components applied to unsymmetrical systems, and 
simultaneous faults. 

Mr. Stevenson 

EE 638 POWER SYSTEM STABILITY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 514 ,,..,.. 

A study of the principal factors affecting stability and of the method of making stability 
calculations. Illustrations of studies made on actual power systems. 

Mr. Stevenson 

EE 641 ADVANCED DIGITAL COMPUTER THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 520 _,, ... 

A study of the circuits and components of modem digital computers, including basic logic 
systems, codes, advanced systems of circuit logic, vacuum tube, transitor, and magnetic 
components. Memory devices, counters, converters, adders, accumulators, imputs, outputs, 
and computer control systems will be analyzed. 

Mr. Bell 

EE 643 ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 414 

A critical analysis of circuits used in electrical measurements, with special attention to such 
topics as balance convergence, effects of strays, sensitivity, the use of feedback in electronic 
devices, and automatic measuring systems. 

Mr. Hoadley 

EE 645, 646 ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EE 615 or PY 503; MA 541 

A comprehensive study of electricity and magnetism, emphasizing dynamic field theory. 
Potential theory, boundary-value problems, electrostatics and magnetostatics, transients in 
continuous systems, electromagnetic theory of light. 

Mr. Mott 

EE 650 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in EE and approval of adviser. 

Graduate Staff 



Engineering Mechanics 237 

ee 661, 662 special studies in electrical engineering 3 (3-0) f s 

This course provides an opportunity for small groups of advanced graduate students to 
study, under the direction of qualified members of the professional staff, advanced topics 
in their special fields of interest. 

Graduate Staff 



ENGINEERING 

E 100 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING 1 (1-0) f t 

Introduces the student to the profession of engineering and the characteristics and require- 
ments of the study of engineering. 

Mr. Lampe 

E 500 ENGINEERING ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and selection for Honors Program in Engineering 
This is an engineering "case method" experience, making use of the principles of engi- 
neering, physics and mathematics. Professors in Engineering and certain key individuals 
from industry will work singly with the professor in charge to introduce challenging engi- 
neering situations and to stimulate student analysis. 



ENGINEERING MECHANICS 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 311 MECHANICS I (STATICS) 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: PY 201 or 211, MA 201 or 211 

Study of the analytical and graphical solution for the resultant and equilibrium of concur- 
rent, parallel and non-concurrent non-parallel force systems under coplanar or non-coplanar 
conditions. The application of statics to pin connected members, trusses and cables; friction; 
centroids; and moments of inertia. Shear and bending moment equations and diagrams. 

EM 312 MECHANICS II (DYNAMICS) 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 

The kinematic and kinetic study of motion of particles and rigid bodies; absolute and rela- 
tive motion; Coriolis Law; methods of force, mass and acceleration; work and energy; im- 
pulse and momentum. Variable motion, simple harmonic motion, simple balancing of rotat- 
ing parts. 

EM 321 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 311 

Simple stresses and strains in tension, compresison, shear and torsion; external cross shear 
and bending moments in beams; internal stresses in beam and their distribution throughout 
the cross section; design of beams; slope and deflection of beams; statically indeterminate 
reactions of restrained beams; study of stresses at a point by Mohr's circle; column theory; 
design of axially and eccentrically loaded columns. 

EM 341 MECHANICS A (STATICS) 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 201 or PY 211. MA 201 or MA 211 

Forces, resultants and equilibrium of concurrent, parallel and non-concurrent non-parallel 
force systems; statics applied to engineering problems and the solution of stress in simple 
trusses. Centroids and moments of inertia. This course is a condensation of EM 311 and 
with less emphasis. 

EM 342 MECHANICS B (DYNAMICS) 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 341 or EM 311 

The kinematic and kinetic study of motion of particles and rigid bodies; absolute and rela- 
tive motion. Methods of force, mass and acceleration; work and energy impulse and momen- 
tum. This course is a condensation of EM 312 and with less emphasis. 

EM 343 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS A 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 311 or EM 341 

Axial and shear stresses and strains; pure torsion of circular shafts; external shears and 
moments; the distribution of internal shearing and benaing stresses; introduction to deflec- 
tion theory; column theory; design of axially loaded columns. 

EM 430 FLUID MECHANICS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 312 or EM 342 

Fluid statics, kinematics, Bernoulli equation, momentum, free-surface flow, viscosity, pipe 
friction, drag on submerged bodies, lift, elastic wa\e propagation. 



238 Engineering Mechanics 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 503 THEORY OF LINEAR ELASTICITY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 321, MA 301 

The differential equation approach employed in development of the equations representing 
the behavior of a linear elastic solid. The elastic problem formulated in two and three di- 
mensions and various coordinate systems. Application of the theory illustrated through 
selected problems. 

EM 511 THEORY OF PLATES AND SHELLS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 321, MA 301 

A modern study of the theory of plates and shells. Topics are selected from problems in- 
volving membranes, folded plates, circular and rectangular slabs, domes, cylindrical shells 
and hyperbolic paraboloids. Solutions are obtained by both classical and modern numerical 
methods. 

EM 531 HYDRAULIC MACHINERY 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 430 

Theory of lift and application to properllers, fans; blade theory including generalized Ber- 
noulli equation, angular impulse, and angular momentum; forced and free vortex; impulse, 
reaction, and propeller turbines; positive displacement pumps, centrifugal pumps; propaga- 
tion in pipes and surge tanks; fluid couplings and torque converters. 

EM 551 ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 321 

Stresses and strains at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress concentration and 
fatigue; plasticity; inelastic, composite and curved beams; prestress; energy methods; shear 
deflections; buckling problems and column design; and membrane stresses in shells. 

EM 554 THEORY OF VIBRATIONS 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EM 312 or EM 342, EM 321 or EM 343, MA 301 

Free vibrations without damping; natural frequency; forced vibrations without damping; 
balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery; free vibrations with damping; forced 
vibration with damping; vibration of systems with several degrees of freedom; shock and 
sound isolation; application of isolators. 

EM 556 ADVANCED MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 312 

Virtual work; stability; balancing; elastic impact and waves; governors; LaGrangian equa- 
tions of motion; three-dimensional dynamics of rigid body; gyroscopes; derivation from 
Kepler's laws of Newton's law of gravitation. 

EM 601 APPLIED ANALYSIS IN STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 (3-0) t s 

Prerequisites: EM 551, MA 301 

Advanced problems by energy methods. Difficult internal stress problems. Stresses in thin- 
webbed curved beams; stresses in square and curved knees of rigid frames; torsion in rolled 
profiles; design of beams for bending and torsion; equilibrium and compatibility in two 
dimensions; Airy's stress function; pure bending of plates; the plate equation; transverse 
and middle plane loads on plates. Beams on elastic foundations. 

EM 602 ELASTIC STABILITY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 321, MA 301, EM 551 

A study of elastic and plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The 
energy method and the theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of buckling 
problems by finite differences and the calculus of variations. The application of successive 
approximations to stability problems. 

EM 604 THEORY OF PLASTICITY 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: EM 503 

Development of the equations representing the plastic behavior of deformable solids. 
Yield conditions and plastic stress-strain relations. Planestrain theory, hyperbolic equations 
and slip line fields. Selected problems to illustrate the theory. 

EM 605 RESEARCH IN STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 (3-0) f s 

Special problems and investigations. 

EM 606 RESEARCH IN MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS 3 (3-0) f t 

Special problems and investigations. 

EM 607 RESEARCH IN FLUID MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Special problems and investigations. 

EM 608 ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: EM 430 

Potential motion; vortex theory; Navier-Stokes equations; theories of turbulence; theory 
of boundary layer; boundary separation; unsteady flow; vibrations of fluids. 

EM 610 ENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Reports, discussions, and preparation of papers. 



English 239 

ENGLISH 

FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

ENG 111, 112 COMPOSITION (BASIC COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS) 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of all freshmen 

Intensive practice in composition, with review in grammar and usage; reading and analysis 
of basic types of communication, with primary emphasis on comprehension; directed sup- 
plementary reoding; oral and written reports; conferences 

ENG Ills ACCELERATED FRESHMAN COMPOSITION 3 (3-0) f 

ENG 112s ACCELERATED FRESHMAN COMPOSITION 6 (3-0) s 

For selected students only 

An intensive program in reading and in composition for superior students. 112s will be 
scheduled only by students especially recommended by Ills instructors and will include 
work normally covered in the regular sections of ENG 112 and ENG 205. 

WRITING 

ENG 211 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Practical application of the principles of composition to effective business communications, 
including basic types of correspondence and reports. Special attention will be paid to vo- 
cabulary building, and work will be given in oral business communications. 

ENG 215 PRINCIPLES OF NEWS AND ARTICLE WRITING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Introduction to the writing of simple news articles; class criticism of non-technical news- 
paper and magazine articles. 

ENG 216 ADVANCED ARTICLE WRITING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ENG 112, ENG 215 or equivalent 

A continuation of ENG 215, with intensive practice in writing and criticizing non-technical 

articles. 

ENG 222 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (CREATIVE WRITING) 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

A course in creative writing especially designed for students who have demonstrated ability; 
emphasis on short prose fiction. 

ENG 223 VOCABULARY BUILDING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

A system of increasing the student's supply of useful words as found in the best modern 
English prose. 

ENG 321 SCIENTIFIC WRITING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Intensive practice in writing technical and scientific reports, articles for journals, and busi- 
ness letters relating to technical reports. 

ENG 424 MODERN ENGLISH USAGE 3 (3-0) s 

An intensive study of English grammar with particular emphasis on contemporary usage. 
A brief survey of the historical development of the language will be included. 



SPEECH 

ENG 231 BASIC SPEAKING SKILLS 3 (3-0) * s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Training in the fundamentals of public speaking; supplementary training in some aspects of 

group discussion (panel, forum, symposium or committee) and in the techniques of good 

listening. 

ENG 332 ARGUMENTATION AND PERSUASION 3 (3-0) t 
Prerequisite: ENG 231 or equivalent 

Analysis, brief-drawing and evidence, and methods of proof and refutation; fundamentals 

of conviction; naturalness and forcefulness, extempore speeches, debates and discussions. 



240 English 

eng 333 public address and extemporaneous speaking 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENG 231 or equivalent 

Public speaking for special occasions, including speech of introduction, committee-room 

speech, after-dinner speech, speech at professional convention, political speech, formal sales 

talk. 

ENG 334 ORAL READING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ENG 112, and ENG 231, or approval of the department 

Training in the analysis and presentation of printed materials, technical and semi-technical, 
for platform, radio, and television. Emotional reactions to add color and interest; expressive 
body and voice; correction of faulty habits. 

ENG 336 PARLIAMENTARY PRACTICE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

(Not to be counted toward the fulfillment of any requirement in languages, humanities or 

social sciences without specific authorization.) 

Rules and customs of assemblies, including organization, motions; participation in and 

conduct of meetings; parliamentary strategy. 

ENG 337 GROUP DISCUSSION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ENG 112, and ENG 231, or approval of the department 

The theory and practice of leading and taking part in such groups as panels, forums, sym- 
posiums, conferences and committees. Oral and written assignments. Frequent recordings. 



LITERATURE 

Note: ENG 111 and 112 are prerequisites to all courses in literature 

ENG 205 READING FOR DISCOVERY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of selected masterworks drawn from English and European literature with emphasis 
on the great themes and on the approach of the creative artist to basic ideas in Western 
culture. 

ENG 361 BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH CIVILIZATION (I) 3 (3-0) f 

A reading course in English literature from the Anglo-Saxon invasions to the Romantic 
period, with an emphasis on the contributions of English life and thought to Western civili- 
zation. 

ENG 362 BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH CIVILIZATION (II) 3 (3-0) s 

English literature from the Romantic period to the present day. This course may be taken 
either as a continuation of ENG 361 or as an independent course. 

ENG 365 THE AMERICAN MIND I 3 (3-0) f 

The development of American thought and civilization as reflected in American literature 
from the colonial settlements through the New England revival of the nineteenth century. 

ENG 366 THE AMERICAN MIND (II) 3 (3-0) s 

The background of contemporary American literature and thought, from Mark Twain to 
Hemingway and Faulkner. This course may be taken either as a continuation of ENG 365 
or as an independent course. 

ENG 375 SOUTHERN WRITERS 3 (3-0) s 

An introduction to Southern culture as revealed in poetry and short fiction from Poe to 

the present day. Readings in the Southern essay dealing with social, political, and literary 
problems. 

ENG 382 SHORT PROSE FICTION 3 (3-0) f 

The study of selected short stories by the most representative of contemporary British and 
American writers. 

ENG 468 MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS 3 (3-0) f s 

Concentrated study of the writings of Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, and Whitman as they 
exemplify the spirit of American individualism. 
(Students may not receive credit for both ENG 366 and ENG 468.) 

ENG 471 THE NOVEL 3 (3-0) f s 

Analysis of representative English and American novels chosen to illustrate the structure and 
the development of the form. 

ENG 480 MODERN DRAMA 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the development of modern drama as a form for the expression of social and 
humanistic ideas through a systematic examination of the plays of Ibsen, Shaw, and Eugene 
O'Neill. 

ENG 485 SHAKESPEARE 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the principal plays with emphasis on reading Shakespeare for enjoyment. 



Entomology 241 

ENG 496 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD (I) 3 (3-0) f 

Readings from selected great books from the Homeric period of Greek literature to the 
Renaissance in Europe. Emphasis on the contributions of this literature to modern thought. 

ENG 497 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD (II) 3 (3-0) s 

Readings from selected great books from the Renaissance to the twentieth century with 
emphasis on literary appreciation and on the development of important concepts underlying 
contemporary life in the Western World. This course may be taken either as a continuation 
of ENG 496 or as an independent course. 

ENG 498 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 3 ,l 3 "c 0) s 

A study of selected examples of American, British, and Continental writing from 1915 to 
the present day with reference to changing literary forms and themes. 



ENTOMOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 301 INTRODUCTION TO FOREST INSECTS JA 2 ' 2) i 

An introductory course covering the fundamentals of classification, development, habit, and 
control of forest insects. _ 

Mr. Brett 

ENT 312 ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 1 03 ...*... , _■ ■_ u-i. 

A basic course, covering the fundamentals of insect classification, development, food habits, 

and controls. _ 

Mr. Brett 

ENT 322 BEEKEEPING 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

A basic course dealing with the place of the honeybee in our agricultural economy; the 
colony and its components; management; manipulation; honey production, care and market- 
ing. 

Mr. Stephen 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 501, 502 INSECT MORPHOLOGY 3 (1-4) f s 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 .... rklT _„, 

Covers general morphology, external and internal, of the insects and their relatives. ENT 501 
will deal primarily with external morphology and ENT 502 with internal morphology. 
Offered in odd numbered years) 

Mr. Young 

ENT 511 SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, designed to acquaint the 

student with these groups and develop in the student some ability in the use of keys, 

descriptions, etc. 

(Offered in odd numbered years) 

Mr. Young 

ENT 531 INSECT ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

The influence of environmental factors on insect development, distribution and behavior. 
(Offered in odd numbered years) 

Messrs. Lawson, Rabb 
4 (2-4) f 

ENT 541, 542 IMMATURE INSECTS 2 (2-4) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 511 or permission of instructor 

541 is a study of the characteristics of the immature forms of the orders and principal 

families of insects. 542 is a detailed study of the immature forms of some special group of 

insects of the students' own choosing. 

(Offered in even numbered years) 

Messrs. Neunzig, Rabb 



242 Entomology 

ENT 551, 552 APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY 3 (2-2) f i 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

An advanced course in which the principles of applied entomology are studied in respect 
to the major economic insect pests. Methods of determining and examining insect damage, 
the economic importance of insects and the chief economic pests of man, food and fiber 
are studied as well as laws and regulations pertaining to insects and insecticides. 
(Offered in odd numbered years) 

ENT 562 LITERATURE AND HISTORY OF ENTOMOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A general course intended to acquaint the student with literature problems of the scientist, 
mechanics of the library and book classification, bibliographies of the zoological sciences, 
abstract journals, forms of bibliographies, forms of literature, preparation of scientific 
papers; toxonomic indexes and literature (with a historical background) and history of the 
development of zoological science from ancient to modern times with emphasis on entomo- 
logy. 
(Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Farrier 

ENT 572 FOREST ENTOMOLOGY 3 (2-2) $ 

Prerequisites: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A study of methods of identification of forest pests, the factors governing their abundance, 

habits and control. 

(Offered in even numbered years) 

ENT 582 (ZO 592) MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY (Parasitology II) 

3 (2-3) $ 
Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A study of the morphology, biology, and control of the parasitic orthopods of man, do- 
mestic and wild animals. 
(Offered in odd numbered years) 

Mr. Harkema 

ENT 590 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by arrangements 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor 

Original research on special problems in entomology not related to a thesis problem, but 

designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Staff 

ENT 592 ACAROLOGY 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A systematic survey of the mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, biology, and 

control of the more common and economic forms attacking stored products, plants and 

animals, including man. 

(Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Farrier 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENT 602 PRINCIPLES OF TAXONOMY 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 511 

A course introducing the methods and tools used in animal taxonomy, designed to promote 

a better understanding of taxonomic literature and provide a foundation for taxonomic 

research. 

(Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Young 

ENT 611 INSECT PHYSIOLOGY 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisites: ENT 312, ENT 502, CH 451 or equivalent 

The course deals with the aspects of animal physiology related to insects. The functions 

of the various insect organs are discussed and how these systems are disrupted by economic 

poisons. Laboratory work includes the use of standard physiological opparatus with emphasis 

on methods rather than obtaining results. 

(Offered in even numbered years) 

Mr. Gast 

ENT 622 INSECT TOXICOLOGY 4 (3-2) s 

Prerequisites: ENT 312, CH 426 or equivalent 

The course deals with chemicals and physical characteristics of insecticides and formula- 
tions and their effects on biological systems. Modes of action and mammalian toxicities 
are also discussed. Laboratory work involves insect culture work, formulating insecticides 
and evaluating the effectiveness of various materials. 
(Offered in odd numbered years) 

Mr. Gast 



Experimental Statistics 243 

ent 632 advanced systematic entomology 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 51 1 

A detailed study of some special insect group of the student's own choosing. 

Mr. Young 

ENT 680 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields 
Discussion of entomological topics selected and assigned by seminar chairman. 

Graduate Staff 

ENT 690 RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields 
Original research in connection with thesis problem in entomology. 

Graduate Staff 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 302 STATISTICAL LABORATORY 2 (1-2) i 

The use of conventional IBM punch card machines with special emphasis on gathering 
data for punch cards, coding, designing card fields and the operation of the punch, verifier, 
sorter, collator, and tabulator. A survey of the methods used for programming on electronic 
computers will be given. 

Mr. Verlinden 

ST 311 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3 (2-2) f s 

This course will relate general statistical concepts to everyday life and will emphasize giv- 
ing perspective to these concepts in place of developing skill. Quantitative descriptions of 
populations, sampling ideas, techniques of making inferences about populations from samples 
and the uncertainties involved in such inferences. Formulation and testing of hypotheses, 
elementary and basic statistical techniques. 

Messrs. McVay, Monroe 

ST 361 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: College Algebra 

Survey of statistical techniques useful to engineers and physical scientists. Includes elemen- 
tary probability, frequency distributions, estimation of means and standard deviations, 
sampling variation, control charts, elementary least squares curve fitting, chi-square tests, 
analysis of variance, elementary design of experiments. 

Messrs. Hader, Grandage 

ST 362 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS II 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Continuation of ST 361. Additional and more advanced statistical methodology for engi- 
neers and physical scientists. Includes least squares method for fitting polynomials and 
multiple regression; principles of sampling finite populations; stratified, systematic and two 
stage sampling; sampling acceptance inspection; introduction to analysis of variance and 
design of experiments. 

Mr. Hader 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 511 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES I 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: ST 31 1 or graduate standing 

Basic concepts of statistical models and use of samples, variation and statistical measures, 
distributions, tests of significance, analysis of variance and elementary experimental de- 
sign, regression and correlation, chi-square. 

Messrs. Monroe, Steel 

ST 512 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 51 1 

Covariance, multiple regression, factorical experiments, individual degrees of freedom, in- 
complete block designs, experiments repeated over space and time. 

Messrs. Steel, Mason 

ST 513 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES I 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or graduate standing 

Basic concepts in collection and analysis of data. Variability of sample data, distributions, 
confidence limits, chi-square, "t"-test, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, analytic 
ond descriptive surveys, experimental designs, index numbers. 

Mr. McVay 



244 Experimental Statistics 

st 514 experimental statistics for social sciences ii 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 513 

Extension of basic concepts of experimental statistics to social surveys and experiments. 
Sampling from finite populations; sampling systems, unrestricted stratified and multistage 
random and systematic selection with varying probabilities; methods of estimation; analysis 
of variance with multiple classification; covariance; multiple regression; polynomials. 

Mr. Proctor 

ST 515, 516 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS 3 (3-0) f 

or 4 (3-2) f 
3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: ST 361 or graduate standing 

General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in engineering, tex- 
tiles, wood technology, etc. Probability, distributions, measurement of precision, simple and 
multiple regression, tests of significance, analysis of variance, enumeration data, sensitivity 
data, life testing experiments, and experimental design. 
One credit optional laboratory available first term only. 

Mr. Hader 

ST 521, 522 BASIC STATISTICAL THEORY 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisites: ST 311 or graduate standing and undergraduate calculus 

Probability, frequency distributions and moments; sampling distributions; introductory theory 
of point and interval estimation; parametric and non-parametric tests of hypotheses; theory 
of least squares; multiple regression, analysis of variance and covariance, variance com- 
ponents. 

Messrs. Grandage and Anderson 

ST 591 SPECIAL PROBLEMS 1-3 credits by arrangement f s 

Development of techniques for specialized cases, particularly in connection with thesis and 
practical consulting problems. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ST 611, 612 INTERMEDIATE STATISTICAL THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ST 522, Advanced Calculus and Matrix Theory 

This course will provide the additional theory, above that of ST 521-522, needed for ad- 
vanced theory courses. Many of the topics of ST 521-522 will be developed more rigorous- 
ly, and more attention will be paid to mathematical aspects. Advanced probability theory; 
central limit theorem, law of large numbers, bivariate normal distributions, convergence 
theorems. Theory of estimation; method of maximum likelihood, efficient estimates, simul- 
taneous confidence regions; general theory of tests of hypotheses, general linear hypothesis, 
sequential tests of hypotheses, distribution-free methods. 

Mr. Hall 

ST 621 STATISTICS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 512 

Sources and magnitudes of errors in experiments with animals, experimental designs and 

methods of analysis adopted to specific types of animal research, relative efficiency of 

alternate designs, amount of data required for specified accuracy, student reports on 

selected topics 

(Offered in 1961-62 and alternate years) 

Mr. Lucas 

ST 623 STATISTICS IN PLANT SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 512 

Principles and techniques of planning, establishing and executing field and greenhouse 
experiments. Size, shape and orientation of plots; border effects; selection of experimental 
material; estimation of size of experiments for specified accuracy; scoring and subjective 
tests; subsampling plots and yields for laboratory analysis. 

Mr. Mason 

ST 626 STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN GENETICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: GN 512 or ST 512 unless taken concurrently 

Factors bearing on rates of change in population means and variances, with special reference 
to cultivated plants and domestic animals; selection, inbreeding, magnitude and nature 
of genotypic and non-genotypic variability; experimental and statistical approaches in 
the analysis of quantitative inheritance. 

Mr. Cockerham 

ST 631 THEORY OF SAMPLING APPLIED TO SURVEY DESIGN 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 512 or ST 514 or ST 516 

Basic theory of sampling from a finite population. Confidence limits and estimation of 
optimum sample size, comparison of different sample designs, methods and probabilities 
for selection and methods of estimation, choice of a sampling unit, double sampling, 
matched samples. 

Graduate Staff 



Field Crops 245 

st 641 (rs 641) statistics in sociology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 513 

The application of statistical methods in sociological research. Emphasis on selecting 
appropriate models, instruments and techniques for the more frequently encountered prob- 
lems and forms of data. 

Mr. Hamilton 

ST 651 (AGC 651) ECONOMETRIC METHODS I 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 521, AGC 642 

Decision making under uncertainty, stochastic elements in economic theories, problems of 
model construction, special techniques for analyzing simultaneous economic relations. 

Mr. Wallace 

ST 652 (AGC 652) ECONOMETRIC METHODS II 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 522, AGC 641 

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of significance as applied to economic data. Em- 
pirical sampling methods, non-parametric methods, sequential testing; extension of least 
squares methods to research in economics, production surfaces; special topics in variance 
components and mixed models; use of experimental designs in economic research; elements 
of multivariate analysis; techniques for analysis of time series. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 661 ADVANCED SPECIAL PROBLEMS 1-3 credits by arrangement f s 

Special lecture series on new advances in statistics. 

Graduate Staff, Visiting Scholars 

ST 671 ADVANCED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 512, ST 522 

General computational methods for linear regression, non-orthogonal data, carryover 
effects, orthogonal polynomials, response surfaces, non-linear systems, variance com- 
ponents for orthogonal and non-orthogonal data. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 672 SPECIAL ADVANCED TOPICS IN STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 671 

Regression analysis with errors in both variables, transformations, enumeration data, 

discriminant functions, heterogeneous errors, non-parametric analysis. 

Mr. Monroe 

ST 674 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF 

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or ST 512, ST 522 

Inter-block analysis of incomplete blocks designs, partially balanced designs, confounding, 
data collected at several places and times, multiple factor designs, change-over trials, 
analysis of groups of means. 

Graduate Staff 

ST 681 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

A maximum of three credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward 
the doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

ST 691 RESEARCH Credits by arrangement f s 

A maximum of nine credits is allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation on credits 
in doctorate programs. 

Graduate Staff 



FIELD CROPS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

FC 211 FIELD CROPS I 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

Discussion of fundamental principles underlying crop production. The application of these 
principles to the major and minor field crops. The elements of plant identification, crop 
grading and judging. 

Mr. Lewis 

FC 311 FIELD CROPS II 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: FC 211, SOI 200 

Specific problems in field crop production other than forage crops. Discussion of those 
crops in form rotations brings together all the major aspects of crop production for 
different climatic areos. 

Mr. Lewis 



246 Field Crops 

fc 312 pastures and forage crops 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FC 211, SOI 200 recommended 

A study of the production and preservation of the principal forage crops. Special attention 

is given to the development and maintenance of pastures. 

Mr. Chamblee 

FC 412 ADVANCED PASTURES AND FORAGE CROPS 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: FC 312 

Pasture species and management (cultural treatment) from an international viewpoint, and 

the inter-relationship of grazing animals on pasture development and manaement will 

be emphasized. Natural grassland areas and the place of special plant species will be 

considered. 

Mr. Gilbert 

FC 413 PLANT BREEDING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The application of genetic principles to the improvement of economic plants, including 
discussions of the methods employed in the development and the perpetuation of de- 
sirable clones, varieties and hybrids. 

Mr. Havrey 

FC 414 WEEDS AND THEIR CONTROL 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: FC 211, CH 203 or equivalent 

Principles involved in cultural and chemical weed control. Discussions on chemistry of 
herbicides and the effects of the chemicals on the plant. Identification of common weeds 
and their seeds is given. 

Mr. Klingman 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

FC 511 TOBACCO TECHNOLOGY 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: FC 311, BO 421 or equivalent 

A study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research problems 

and findings dealing with this important cash crop will be discussed. 

Mr. Jones 

FC 521 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Students admitted only with consent of instructor 

Special problems in various phases in Field Crops. Problems may be selected or will be 

assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Graduate Staff 

FC 541 (GN 541 or HRT 541) PLANT BREEDING METHODS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: GN 512, ST 511 recommended 

An advance study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts 
of inheritance. 

Messrs. Dudley, Mann 

FC 542 (GN 542 or HRT 542) PLANT BREEDING FIELD PROCEDURES 2 (0-4) 

(In Summer Sessions) 

Prerequisite: FC 541 or GN 541 or HRT 541 

A laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding techniques 

and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Messrs. Haynes, Dudley) 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

Students are to consult the instructor before registration. 

FC 611 FORAGE CROP ECOLOGY 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: FC 412, BO 441 

A study of the effect of environmental factors on the growth of forage crops. Attention 
will be given to methods of research in forage ecology. 

Mr. Chamblee 

FC 612 SPECIAL TOPICS IN WEED CONTROL 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites or corequisites: BO 403, BO 532, FC 414 

Detailed examination of current concepts in selected fields of weed control. The chemistry, 
physiology, ecology, taxonomy, microbiology, equipment and techniques used in weed 
control research will be discussed. 

Graduate Staff 



Forestry 



247 



FC 631 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f % 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to 
agronomists reviewed and discussed. A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the 
Master's degree. 

Graduate Staff 



FC 641 RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's degree 



Credits by arrangement 



Graduate Staff 



FORESTRY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



FOR 101, 102 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY 1 (1-0) f s 

The profession of Forestry, its scope and opportunities; conservation of natural resources; 
forestry field practice. 

Mr. Preston 

FOR 201 WOOD STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES 3 (1-4) f 

Required of sophomores in Forest Management. 

Identification, structure, properties and uses of woods of economic importance in the 
United States; identification by means of hand lens is emphasized. 

Mr. Thomas 

FOR 202 WOOD STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES I 2 (0-6) f 

Required of sophomores in Wood Technology and Pulp and Paper Technology. 
The macro-and micro-structure of wood is emphasized in this introductory course. As 
related to wood structure, the physical properties and uses of several commercially important 
coniferous and deciduous woods are also studied. The techniques of hand lens and micro- 
scope identification of wood are covered. 

Mr. Thomas 

FOR 203 WOOD STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES II 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: FOR 202, PY 211 

Physical properties of wood, specific gravity relationships, wood in relation to moisture, 
wood in relation to heat, sound, light, electricity, combustion; introduction to strength 
properties of wood. 

Mr. Barefoot 



FOR s204 SILVICULTURE 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Growth and development of forest stands; reproduction counts, type 

and weeding; establishment and measurement of sample plots. 

FOR s205 WOOD MACHINING PRACTICUM 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 

Prerequisite: FOR 203 

Laboratory exercises in matching of wood. 

FOR s206 WOOD DRYING PRACTICUM 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 
Laboratory exercise in wood drying 

FOR s207 GLUING PRACTICUM 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 

Laboratory exercise in gluing wood and preparation of particle board. 

FOR s208 WOOD FINISHING PRACTICUM 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 
Laboratory exercises in wood finishing. 

FOR $209 PLANT INSPECTIONS 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 
Inspection of wood-using plants. 

FOR s210 MENSURATION PRACTICUM 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 
Laboratory exercises in mensuration. 



2 


credits 


mapping, th 


inning, 


Mr. 


Miller 


1 


credit 




Staff 


1 


credit 




Staff 


1 


credit 




Staff 


1 


credit 




Staff 


1 


credit 




Staff 


2 


credits 




Staff 



248 Forestry 

FOR s211 LOGGING AND MILLING PRACTICUM 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 

Practical exercises in logging and milling. Staff 

FOR s212 GRAPHIC METHODS 1 credit 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 

Laboratory exercises in appropriate graphic methods. 

Staff 

FOR s214 DENDROLOGY 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Practicum 

Identification and study of trees in piedmont and mountain sections of North Carolina. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR s224 FOREST MAPPING 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Field problems in forest mapping, including boundary location and type mapping. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR s264 PROTECTION AND UTILIZATION 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Suppression of forest fires, fire behavior; trips to wood industries. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR $274 MENSURATION 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Prerequisite: CE 217 

Collection of field data for stand and yield tables, stem analysis, and timber surveys. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 301 WOOD PROCESSES I 4 (3-2) * 

Prerequisites: FOR 203, FOR 209 

The processes of drying, gluing and finishing wood. Processes of reconstituting wood as 
fiberboard, hardboard and particle board. Basic requirements of various procedures and 
materials. Factors in selecting production methods. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 302 WOOD PROCESSES II 4 (3-2) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 203, FOR 209 

The theories and techniques of converting raw wood into usable products by milling, ve- 
neering and chipping round wood. Included also is the processing of finished lumber, di- 
mension stock, plywood and other wood products. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 311 PRINCIPLES OF FARM FORESTRY 2 (1-3) f 

The theory and practice of forestry with special reference to the handling of farm wood- 
lands and the utilization of their products; the place of forestry in farm management and 
the agricultural economy. 

Mr. Bryant and Mr. Miller 

FOR 321, 322 PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 2 (3-0) f s 

Brief survey of the physical and chemical characteristics of wood and cellulose. Chemistry 
and technology of the major mechanical, chemical and semi-chemical processes employed in 
the manufacture of pulp and paper. 

Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 342 FIBER ANALYSIS 2 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: FOR 202 

Fiber microscopy; the determination of fiber measurement, quality, variation and identity 
in pulpwood. 

Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 361, 362 SILVICS 3 (3-0) f 

Site, soil and other environmental factors in relation to the establishment, growth, and 
development of seedlings, trees and timber stands; the influence of forest vegetation on 
site, ground water, and micro-climate. 

Mr. Maki and Mr. Perry 

FOR 372 MENSURATION 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: FOR s274 

The measurement of timber, both standing and felled; log rules form factors, stem analysis; 
and growth; methods of making volume, growth, and stand tables; increment and yield 
studies; development of stand and yield tables from field data. 

Mr. Maki 

FOR 401 WOOD PRESERVATION 2 (1-3) s 

Factors causing wood deterioration; preservative matreials and treatments; wood by-prod- 
ucts from mill and forest waste. 

Mr. Carter 



Forestry 249 

for 402 foundations of forest management 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR s274 or FOR 311 

The integration of silviculture, forest measurements and economics in the management of 

woodland areas. (Not open to students majoring in forest management). 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 403 PAPER TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 3 (0-6) s 

Manufacture of several types of papers with particular attention to stock preparation, 
sizing, filling and coloring. The finished products are tested physically and chemically and 
evaluated from the standpoint of quality and in comparison with the commercial products 
they are intended to duplicate. 

Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 404 MANAGEMENT PLANS 3 (1-6) s 

Application of management, logging, silvicultural and utilization practices on assigned 
areas. Each student must make a forest survey of an individual area and submit a record. 

Staff 

FOR 405 FOREST INVENTORY 2 (0-6) s 

Senior camp 

Practical field work in timber estimating and compilation of field data. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 406 FOREST INDUSTRIES 2 (0-6) s 

Senior camp 

A field study of logging, milling and manufacturing with reports bosed on inspection trips. 

Staff 

FOR 407 FIELD SILVICULTURE 2 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: FOR 361 
Senior camp 

Studies of forest communities; dendrology of the coastal section of North Carolina; silvi- 
culture practices. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR 411 PULP AND PAPER MILL EQUIPMENT 3 (3-0) f 

Principles of operation, construction and design of process equipment employed in the pulp 
and paper industry. 

Mr. Cook 

FOR 412 PULP AND PAPER MILL EQUIPMENT 2 (1-3) s 

Continuation of FOR 41 1 

Mr. Cook 

FOR 413 PAPER TESTING LABORATORY 2 (0-6) f 

Physical, chemical and microscopical examination of experimental and commercial papers 
and evaluation of the results in terms of the utility of the porducts tested. 

Mr. Cook 

FOR 422 FOREST PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or CH 426 

The source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured forest products other than 

lumber. 

Mr. Thomas 

FOR 423 LOGGING AND MILLING 3 (3-0) f 

Timber harvesting and transportation methods, equipment and costs; safety and super- 
vision; manufacturing methods with; log and lumber grades. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 432 MERCHANDISING FOREST PRODUCTS 2 (2-0) t 

Principles and practices in the distribution and marketing of the products obtained from 
wood; organization and operation of retail, concentration and wholesale outlets. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 434 WOOD OPERATIONS I 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, FOR 302, EC 450 or EC 455 

Organization of manufacturing plants producing wood products including company organ- 
ization, plant layout, production planning and control. Analysis of typical manufacturing 
operation in terms of processes, equipment, size and product specifications. The organizations 
and operations of Wood Products markets. Merchandising practices ond procedures. 

Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 435 WOOD OPERATIONS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, FOR 302, EC 450 or 455, MA 202 or MA 212 

The application of the techniques of operations analysis to management decision making 
in the wood products field. Choice of products to manufacture. Allocation of production 
resources. Determining upon an inventory policy. Development of product distribution 
systems. The elements of statistical quality control. 

Mr. Barefoot 



250 Forestry 

for 441 design of wood structures 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: EM 311, EM 321 

Strength and related properties of commercial woods; standard A.S.T.M., strength tests; 
toughness; timber fastenings; design of columns; simple, laminated and box beams; 
trusses and arches. 

Mr. Thomas 

FOR 451 PAPER COLORING LABORATORY 2 (0-6) f 

Evaluation and identification of dyestuffs and the development of color formula for dye- 
ing pulp and paper. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 453 FOREST GRAZING 2 (2-0) f 

Management of range areas, all grazing regions with special consideration of the southeast. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 461 PAPER CONVERTING 1 (1-0) f 

A survey of the principal processes by which paper and paper board are fabricated into 
the utilitarian products of everyday use. 

Mr. Cook 

FOR 462 ARTIFICIAL FORESTATION 2 (1-3) s 

Production collection, extraction, and storage of forest tree seeds; nursery practice; field 
methods of planting. 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR 463 PLANT INSPECTIONS 1 (0-3) s 

One week inspection trips covering representative manufactures of pulp and paper and 
papermaking equipment. 

FOR 471 PULP TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 4 (0-12) f 

Preparation and evaluation of the several types of wood pulp. The influences of the various 
pulping and bleaching variables on pulp quality are studied experimentally and these data 
evaluated critically. 

Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 472 FOREST POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION 2 (2-0) f 

Civil timber law, illustrated by court cases; state and federal forest policy; job-load 
analysis in national forest administration. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR 481 PULPING PROCESSES AND PRODUCTS 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or CH 426 

Fiber manufacturing process and equipment; wall, insulation and contaienr board prod- 
ucts; manufacture of roofing felts; pulp products manufacturing; resin treated and specialty 
products, lignin and wood sugar products. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 482 PULP AND PAPER MILL MANAGEMENT 2 (2-0) s 

A survey of the economics of the pulp and paper industry is followed by a study of the 
work of the several departments of a paper mill organization and the functions of the 
executives who administer them. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 491, 492 SENIOR PROBLEMS 1 (1-0), 4 (0-12) 

Problems selected with faculty approval in the areas of management or technology. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 501 FOREST VALUATION 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 372 

The theory and techniques of valuation of forest land, timber stands, and forest practices 
as investments and for appraisals of damage. Risks and hazards in forestry as they apply 
to forest investments, forest insurance, and forest taxation. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 511 SILVICULTURE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 361, BO 421 

The principle and application of intermediate and reproductive methods of cutting; con- 
trolled burning, silvicides, and other methods of hardwood control. The application of silvi- 
cultural methods in the forests of the United States. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR 512 FOREST ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 372, EC 201 

Economics and social value of forest; supply of, and demands for forest products; land 
use; forestry as a private and a public enterprise; economics of the forest industries. 

Mr. Bryant 



Forestry 251 

for 513 tropical woods 2 (0-4) s 

Prerequisite: FOR 202 

Structure, identification, properties, characteristics and use of tropical woods, especially 

those used in plywood and furniture. 

Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 521, 522 CHEMISTRY OF WOOD AND PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: FOR 201 or FOR 202, CH 215, CH 426, PY 212 

Fundamental chemistry and physics of wood and wood components; pulping principles; 
electrical and thermal properties. 

Mr. Stamm 

FOR 531, 532 FOREST MANAGEMENT 3 (2-3) 

Prerequisites: FOR 372; Corequisite: FOR 511 

Management of timber lands for economic returns; the normal forest taken as the ideal; 
the application of regulation methods to the forest. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 533 ADVANCED WOOD STRUCTURES AND IDENTIFICATION 2 (0-6) f 

Prerequisite: FOR 202 

Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United States and 
some tropical woods; microscopic anatomical features and laboratory techniques. 

FOR 553 FOREST PHOTOGRAMMETRY 2 (2-6) s 

Prerequisite: FOR 372; Corequisite: FOR 531 

Interpretation of aerial photographs, determination of density of timber stands and area 

mapping. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 573 METHODS OF RESEARCH IN FORESTRY Credits arranged 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing 

Research procedures, problem outlines, presentation of results; consideration of selected 

studies by forest research organizations; sample plot technique. 

Mr. Maki, Mr. Zobel 

FOR 591 FORESTRY PROBLEMS Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber manufacturing, 

pulp technology, or forest management. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FOR 601 ADVANCED FOREST MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Directed studies in forest management. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR 603 TECHNOLOGY OF WOOD ADHESIVES 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: CH 425, CH 426; FOR 433 

The fundamentals of adhesives as applied to wood-to-wood and wood-to-metal bonding. 
Technology of adhesives. Preparation and use of organic adhesives. Testing of adhesives 
and evaluation of quality of adhesives and bonded joints. 

FOR 604 TIMBER PHYSICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 441 

Density, specific gravity and moisture content variation affecting physical properties; 
physics of drying at high and low temperatures; thermal, sound, light and electrical 
properties of wood. 

FOR 605 DESIGN AND CONTROL OF FOOD PROCESSES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 604 

Design and operational control of equipment for processing wood. 

FOR 606 WOOD PROCESS ANALYSIS 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 512, FOR 604 

Analysis of wood processes through the solution of comprehensive problems involving the 
physics of temperature and moisture relations. 

FOR 607 ADVANCED QUALITY CONTROL 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 606, ST 515 

Advanced statistical quality control as applied to wood processing. 



252 Genetics 

FOR 611 FOREST GENETICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: GN 41 1 and permission of instructor 

Application of genetic principles to silviculture, management and pulp utilization. Em- 
phasis is on variations in wild populations, on the bases for selection of desirbale qualities 
and on fundamentals of controlled breeding. 

Mr. Zobel 

FOR 621 ADVANCED WOOD TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Selected problems in the field of wood technology. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR 671 PROBLEMS IN RESEARCH Credits arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR 681 GRADUATE SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Forestry or closely allied fields 

Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special problems and out- 
standing publications in forestry and related fields. 

Graduate Staff 



GENETICS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 301 GENETICS IN HUMAN AFFAIRS 3 (3-0) f s 

Fundamental principles of genetics will be presented at a level not requiring prerequisite 
courses in biological sciences but sufficient for an understanding of the relation of genetics 
to society and technology. A survey will be given of current knowledge of inheritance of 
human traits. 

Mr. Bostian 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 411 THE PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, ZO 103 

An introductory course. The physical basis of inheritance; genes as units of heredity and 

development; qualitative and quantitative aspects of genetic variation. 

Mr. Bostian 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 503 (Al 503) GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF LIVESTOCK 3 (2-3) f s 

GN 512 GENETICS 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 

Intended for students desiring more thorough and detailed training in fundamental genetics 

with some attention to physiological aspects. (Students conduct individual laboratory 

problems.) 

Mr. Grosch 

GN 513 CYTOGENETICS I 4 (3-2) f 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or with consent of instructor 

The chromosomes as vehicles of heredity. Mitosis and meiosis as bases of genetic stability 
and recombination. Structural and numerical aberrations and their effect upon the breed- 
ing systems of piants and animals. Interspecific hybrids and polyploids. Lectures and lab- 
oratory. 

Mr. Gerstel 

GN 520 (PO 520) POULTRY BREEDING 3 (3-0) f 

GN 532 (ZO 532) BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION 3 (3-0) s 

(Offered in 1961-62 and alternate years.) 



Genetics 253 

GN 540 EVOLUTION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The facts and theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes and consequences 
of organic diversity. 

Mr. Smith 

GN 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: GN 512, and either ST 511 or consent of instructor 
Principles and methods of plant breeding. 

Messrs. Dudley, Haynes 

GN 542 (FC 542 or HRT 542) PLANT BREEDING FIELD PROCEDURES 2 (0-4) 

Summer session 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GN 601 (PO 601) ADVANCED POULTRY BREEDING 3 (3-0) f s 

GN 602 (Al 602) POPULATION GENETICS IN ANIMAL IMPROVEMENT 3 (3-0) f 

GN 607 (PP 607) GENETICS OF FUNGI 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: GN 513 or graduate standing in Botany and Zoology 

Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on principles and theories 

that have evolved in recent developments. 

(Offered in 1960-61 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Nelson 

GN 611 (FOR 611) FOREST GENETICS 3 (3-0) f s 

GN 614 CYTOGENETICS II 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or either GN 513 or GN 540 

Laboratory and discussion: The cytogenetic analysis of natural and experimental material, 

plant and animal. Assigned exercises and student projects. The course provides the student 

with a working knowledge of cytogenetic procedure. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Smith 

GN 620 GENETIC CONCEPTS OF SPECIATION 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: GN 512 and either GN 513 or GN 540 

Review of current ideas on the mechanisms of the origin of species and the nature of 

species differentiation. 

Mr. Stephens 

GN 621 GENETICS OF POPULATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: GN 512; Recommended: GN 540 

Review of the forces molding the genetic structure of natural and artificial populations 

of plants and animals. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Mettler 

GN 626 (ST 626) STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN GENETICS 3 (3-0) s 

GN 631 MATHEMATICAL GENETICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: GN 512, GN 513; Recommended: ST 511 and ST 521 

Mathematical representations of basic genetic principles such as gene segregations, linkage 

relations and genetic maps of chromosomes. Symbolic logics of genetics. Applications of 

various frequency distribution theories to genetic and biological phenomena. Analyses of 

experimental and natural populations: estimation of gene frequencies, recombination 

fractions, population numbers, and selective values. Evolutionary dynamics of genetic 

populations. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Kojima 

GN 633 PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: GN 512 

Recent advances in physiological genetics. Attention will be directed to literature on the 
nature and action of genes, and to the interaction of heredity and environment in the 
expression of the characteristics of organisms. 

Mr. Grosch 

GN 641, 642 COLLOQUIUM IN GENETICS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of instructor 

Informed group discussion of prepared topics assigned by instructor. 

Graduate Staff 



254 Geological Engineering 

GN 651 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

GN 661 RESEARCH Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum of six credits for 

the Master's degree; by arrangement for the Doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

GN 671 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GENETICS 1 to 3 f s 

Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing and consent of instructor 
Special topics designed for additional experience and research training. 

Graduate Staff 



GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MIG 101 EARTH SCIENCE 3 (3-0) s 

Elective. Not to be taken after MIG 120 

Introductory course in General Geology; changes in the earth, and underlying physical and 
life processes. 

Staff 

MIG 120 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Dynamic processes acting on and within the earth; materials and makeup of the earth's 
crust; emphasis on engineering and agricultural applications in the southeast. Lectures, 
laboratories and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 222 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Chronologic account of the geological events during the development of the earth's crust, 
mainly in North America. Evolution and environmental significance of the principal fossil 
animal and plant groups. 

Staff 

MIG 323 PALEONTOLOGY 3 (2-3) # $ 

Prerequisite: MIG 222 

Study of fossil life forms, with major emphasis on classification and structure of the in- 
vertebrate animals and their application to problems of correlation of strata. Lectures, 
laboratories and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 325 GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES OF NORTH CAROLINA 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Physical geography, general geology, common rocks and minerals, and mines and quarry 

products of the State. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 330 MINERALOGY 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Crystallography, and physical and chemical mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work. 

Messrs. Miller, Brown 

MIG 351 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Structures imposed on igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock masses by deformation 
and movement in the earth's crust. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 372 ELEMENTS OF MINING ENGINEERING 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisite: MIG 120, junior standing 

Introduction to mining: methods of development and exploitation, drilling and blasting, 
mining law, administration and safety. Lectures, laboratory work and field trips. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 411, 412 ECONOMIC GEOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: MIG 120, MIG 330 

Mode of occurrence, association, origin, distribution and uses of economically valuable 
minerals. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 

Mr. Brown 



Geological Engineering 255 

MIG 442 PETROLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 120, MIG 330 

Materials of the earth's crust; composition, texture, classification, megascopic identifica- 
tion, and alterations of the principal inneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. Lectures, 
laboratories and field trips. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 452 SEDIMENTATION AND STRATIGRAPHY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: MIG 442 

Sedimentary processes, products, and structures. Principles of sub-division of sedimentary 
terranes into natural units and the determination of their ages and history. Lectures, 
laboratories and field trips. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 461 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

The application of geologic principles to engineering practice; analysis of geologic factors 
and processes affecting specific engineering projects. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 462 GEOLOGICAL SURVEYING 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, MIG 442 

Methods of field observation and use of geologic surveying instruments in surface and 
underground work; representation of geologic features by maps, sections and diagrams. 
Lectures, laboratories and field work. 

Messrs. Miller, Parker 

MIG 481, 482 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Reports and discussion of current professional topics. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MIG 510 MINERAL INDUSTRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Mineral Industries 

Economics of mineral industry. Cycles of mineral production. Exhaustibility. Reserves. Valua- 
tion of mineral property. National resources; essential, critical and strategic minerals. World 
distribution and production. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 522 PETROLEUM GEOLOGY 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisites: MIG 330, PY 202 

Properties, origin and modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic and 
economic features of the principal oil and gas fields, mainly in the United States 

Staff 

MIG 531 OPTICAL MINERALOGY 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisites: MIG 330, PY 202 

Optical principles involved in the petrographic (polarizing) microscope and related instru- 
ments. Microscopic determination of minerals in thin section and in fragments. Lectures 
and laboratory work. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 552 GEOPHYSICS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, PY 202 

Fundamental principles underlying all geophysical methods; procedure and instruments in- 
volved in gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical and other methods of studying geo- 
logical structures and conditions; study of applications and interpretations of results. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 571, 572 MINING AND MINERAL DRESSING 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIG 372 

Principles of the mineral industry; mining laws, prospecting, sampling, development, drilling, 
blasting, handling, ventilation and safety; administration; surveying, assaying; preparation, 
beneficiation and marketing. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 581 GEOMORPHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIG 442 

A systematic study of land forms and their relations to processes, stages of development, 
and adjustment to underlying structure. Lectures, map interpretations, and field trips. 

Mr. Brown 



256 History And Political Science 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MIG 611, 612 ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOLOGY 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: MIG 411, MIG 412 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. Regional correla- 
tions. 

Graduate Staff 

MIG 632 MICROSCOPIC DETERMINATION OF OPAQUE MINERALS 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: MIG 531 

Identification of metallic, opaque minerals in polished sections by physical properties, etch 
reactions and microchemical tests. Laboratories. 

Mr. Brown 

MIG 642 ADVANCED PETROGRAPHY 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 442, MIG 531 

Application of the petrographic microscope to the systematic study of the composition and 

origin of rocks; emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rocks. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 681, 682 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports and special problems of interest to geologists and 

geological engineers discussed. 

Graduate Staff 

MIG 691 GEOLOGICAL RESEARCH 3 or 6 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports; special work in Geology to meet the needs and 

interests of the students. Thesis problems. 

Graduate Staff 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

COURSES IN HISTORY FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

HI 201 THE ANCIENT WORLD 2 (2-0) f 

A history of ancient times from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia to the 
decline of Rome in the fifth century. Emphasis is placed upon the evolution of cultures 
and civilizations, and upon the development of art, science, literature, and philosophy. 

HI 202 THE MEDIEVAL WORLD 2 (2-0) s 

The political, economic, social, and cultural developments from the decline of the Roman 
Empire in the West to the emergence of the modern period. 

HI 205 THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD 3 (3-0) f s 

A history of major movements in the Western World from the Renaissance to the present. 

HI 225, 226 MODERN EUROPE 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of political, economic, social, intellectual, and international movements in Europe 
from the end of the Middle Ages to the present, with an introduction covering the medieval 
period. The course divides at 1789. The semesters may be taken separately. 

HI 245, 246 HISTORY OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

A history of European civilization from the Golden Age of Greece to the present. Those 
social, political, and economic currents most influential in the formation of modern society 
are interwoven through the principal periods of cultural expression. 

HI 251 THE UNITED STATES THROUGH RECONSTRUCTION 3 (3-0) f 

A study of major historical developments in the growth of the American nation through 
the political phases of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. 

HI 252 THE UNITED STATES SINCE RECONSTRUCTION 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of major historical developments in the growth of the American nation beginning 
with economic and social phases of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. 

HI 261 THE UNITED STATES IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

An analysis of major developments in American history, with American history considered 
as part of the historical development of modern western civilization. 

HI 301, 302 AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY 3 (3-0) f s 

A history of economic institutions and customs in the United States from the time of the 
transfer to the New World of European economic customs to the present. The course 
divides at 1860. The semesters may be taken separately. 



History and Political Science 257 

hi 306 north carolina history 2 (2-0) s 

The political, social and economic developments of North Carolina from colonial beginnings 
to the present. 

HI 331 THE OLD SOUTH 3 (3-0) f 

The intellectual and cultural history of the Old South and of ante-bellum society from the 
end of the colonial period to the Civil War. 

HI 332 THE NEW SOUTH 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the political, economic and social developments in the South from the Civil 
War to the present. 

HI 333 AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL HISTORY 3 (3-0) f 

Historical developments of agricultural activity in the United States from the transfer of 
western European agriculture to America to the present, with particular emphasis on the 
historical place and importance of agriculture in American life. 

HI 351 BRITISH HISTORY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the political, social, economic, and cultural past of the British Isles from Roman 
times to the present. Emphasis is placed on the position of Britain in Europe, her colonial 
expansion, and on the connection between British and early American history. 

HI 367 MODERN WESTERN ECONOMIC HISTORY 3 (3-0) s 

A treatment of the historical development of the economic customs and institutions of the 
western world during the modern period, beginning with the Commercial Revolution. 

HI 375 LATIN AMERICA 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: HI 205 or HI 252 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the main currents of Latin American development from 1492 to the present 
day. The histories of leading countries including Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, and 
Mexico will be emphasized to show political, economic, and social trends as experienced 
during the conquest, colonization ond independence, and, especially, the national period 
since 1830. 

HI 401 RUSSIAN HISTORY 3 (3-0) f 

This course presents the major trends in Russian social, political, economic, and cultural 

history, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. USSR policy is studied 
in relation to the full sweep of Russian history. 

HI 402 ASIA AND THE WEST 3 (3-0) s 

A history of Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on Asian 
nationalism and conflict with the imperial powers. 

HI 409 COLONIAL AMERICA 2 (2-0) f 

A study of the development of the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries, with special emphasis on European backgrounds. 

HI 412 RECENT UNITED STATES HISTORY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the main currents in American political, economic, social, and diplomatic 
history of the twentieth century. 

HI 415 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SINCE 1870 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: HI 205 or an acceptable substitute 

A study of the relations between the major countries of the world since 1870. In addition 
to the history of actual diplomatic relations, crises and settlements, attention is given to 
the causes of the various international crises. The course also includes study of the develop- 
ment of international organizations and the various points of conflict between international 
law and organization and the sovereignty of independent governments. 

HI 422 HISTORY OF SCIENCE 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the evolution of science from antiquity to the present with particular attention 
given to the impact of the scientific thought upon selected aspects of western civilization. 
The course provides a broad perspective of scientific progress and shows the interrelationship 
of science and major historical developments. 

HI 461 THE SOVIET UNION Some as EC, PS 461) 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: One semester of Economics and Political Science 201 or History 205 or 

acceptable substitute 
An analysis of the structure and function of the major Soviet economic, political and 
social institutions with special stress on the historical roots and continuity of Russian 
civilization. The course is presented in three equal phases of approximately five weeks each, 
covering Russian history, Soviet government, and Soviet economy. 



258 History and Political Science 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HI 534 (SAME AS RS 534) FARMERS' MOVEMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: 3 credits in Amercian history, American government, sociology or a related 

social science 
A history ot agricultural organizations and movements in the United States and Canada 
principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist 
revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, 
cooperative marketing, government programs and present problems. 

Mr. Noblin 

COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PS 201 THE AMERICAN GOVERMENTAL SYSTEM 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the American federal system, integrating national and state government, with 
emphasis on constitutional principles, major governmental organs, governmental functions, 
and the politics and machinery of elections. Some attention is given to other types of 
political systems, and comparisons are made where relevant throughout the course. 

PS 202 COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

A survey of the organization and functions of the diverse rural and urban governments 
in the United States, emphasizing current problems and attempts to solve them. 

PS 301 COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) f 

An analytical study of the federal and unitary systems and the presidential, parliamentary, 
and authoritarian plans of government, with special attention to the governments of the 
United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union. 

PS 302 CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the pattern of international life, the instruments of national policy, the con- 
trols upon international behavior, and the major problems in international relations since 
World War II, including the development of the United Nations and various regional 
arrangements. Attention is given to the national interests and foreign policies of the 
states belonging to the Western and Soviet blocs, with emphasis on the position of the 
United States. 

PS 401 AMERICAN PARTIES AND PRESSURE GROUPS 3 (3-0) f s 

After a brief survey of those features of American government essential to an under- 
standing of the political process, the course proceeds to examine the American electorate 
and public opinion and devotes its major attention to the nature, organization, and pro- 
grams of pressure groups and political parties and to their efforts to direct opinion, gain 
control of government, and shape public policy. Special attention is given to party organi- 
zation and pressure group activity at the governmental level and to recent proposals to 
improve the political party as an instrument of responsible government. 

PS 406 PROBLEMS IN STATE GOVERNMENT 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or an acceptable substitute. 

Selected problems arising from the operation of legislative, administrative, and judicial 
machinery. In addition to acquiring a comprehensive view of these problems each student 
will make an intensive study of a special phase of one of them. Special attention will be 
given to North Carolina. 

PS 461 (SAME AS EC, HI 461) THE SOVIET UNION 3 (3-0) 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PS 501 MODERN POLITICAL THEORY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or an acceptable substitute 

A study of the state and its relationship to individuals and groups, approached through 
the reading of selected passages from the works of outstanding philosophers from the 
sixteenth century to the present. 

Mr. Holtzman 

PS 502 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or PS 202 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the principles and problems of administration in a democracy, including such 
matters as organization, personnel, fiscal management, relationship to the legislative and 
judicial functions, control of administrative agencies and policies and public relations. 

Mr. Block 



Horticulture 259 

ps 503 international organization 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or an acceptable substitute. 

A study of the evolving machinery and techniques of international organization in the 

present century with particular emphasis on recent developments. The actual operation of 

international organization will be illustrated by the study of selected current international 

problems. 

Graduate Staff 

PS 510 (SAME AS EC 510) PUBLIC FINANCE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending, and borrowing, 
including intergovernmental relationships and administrative practices and problems. 

Mr. Block 

PS 512 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or an acceptable substitute. 

Basic constitutional doctrines, including fundamental law, judicial review, individual rights 
and political privileges, and national and state power. Special attention is given to the 
application of these doctrines to the regulation of business, agriculture, and labor and to 
the rights safeguarded by the First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. 

Mr. Edsall 

PS 610 APPLIED PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 2-4 by arrangement f 

Prerequisite: PS 502 or an acceptable substitute. 

An advanced course in administrative principles and methods. Students will perform 
individual or group research, under supervision, in specific administrative topics within the 
context of those public agencies which function in their respective fields of technology. 

Mr. Block 

PS 620 PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 2-4 by arrangement f 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. 

An independent advanced research course in selected problems of government and politics. 
The problems will be chosen in accordance v/ith the needs and desires of the students 
registered for the course. 

Graduate Staff 



HORTICULTURE 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

HRT 201 PRINCIPLES OF HORTICULTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Attention will be directed to the basic principles involved in and the application of these 
principles to the production, processing and utilization of fruit, vegetable, and ornamental 
crops. Attention will also be given to the economic importance and distribution of horti- 
cultural enterprises. 

Mr. Gardner 

HRT 211, 212 ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 3 (1-5) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

Distribution, botanical characters and relationships, adaptation and usage of ornamental 
trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 301 PLANT PROPAGATION 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of principles, methods, and practices in seedage, cuttage, division, budding, 
grafting, and other methods of propagation. Consideration will also be given to scion and 
stock relationships and dormancy. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 321 GRADING, PACKING, AND INSPECTION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 3 (2-3) f 
Prerequisite: BO 103 

A study of grades and standards for the principal fruit and vegetable crops. Practice in 
grading, packing, variety, and disease identification designed to develop an understanding 
of quality. Field trips will be taken to produce markets and warehouses. 

Mr. Gardner 

HRT 342 LANDSCAPE GARDENING 3 (2-3) f 

The application of the principles of design to the landscaping of small properties and the 
selecting and planting of trees, shrubs, flowers, and lawn grasses. Students will be re- 
quired to work out detailed landscape plans. Visitations will be made to outstanding homes 
and gardens. 

Mr. Cannon 



260 Horticulture 

hrt 351 greenhouse management 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103, SOI 200 

Physiological influence of greenhouse environment on growth and production. A study of 
various types of structures, heating, watering, ventilating, sterilization, and business man- 
agement practices. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 411 NURSERY MANAGEMENT 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SOI 200 

The principles and practices involved in the production, management, and marketing of 

field-grown and container-grown nursery plants. Field trips will be taken. 

Mr. Cannon 

HRT 421 FRUIT PRODUCTION 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SOI 200 

A study of identification, adaptation, and methods of production and marketing of the 
principal tree and small fruits. Modern practices as related to selection of sites, nutritional 
requirements, management practices, and marketing procedures will be discussed. 

Mr. Correll 

HRT 432 VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SOI 200 

A study of the origin, importance, distribution, botanical relationships, and principles of 
production and marketing of the major vegetable crops. 

Mr. Miller 

HRT 441 FLORICULTURE I 3 (2*3) f 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SOI 200 

The scope and importance of the commercial flower industry; the basic principles and 
practices involved in the production and marketing of flowers grown in the greenhouse and 
in the field. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 442 FLORICULTURE II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SOI 200 

Principles and methods of production of commercial flower crops in the greenhouse and in 
the field, including fertilization, moisture, temperature, and light relationships, insect 
and disease control, and marketing of cut flowers and pot plants. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 451 PRINCIPLES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROCESSING 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

Principles and methods involved in the preservation of fruits and vegetables with 
emphasis on the major commercial processes. 

Mr. Jones 

HRT 462 GRADING PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 2 (1-2) s 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

Methods of inspection, grading and critical evaluation for quality of the principal fruit 
and vegetable products. 

Mr. Hoover 

HRT 471 ARBORICULTURE 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SOI 200 

A study of the principles and practices in the care and maintenance of ornamental 
trees and shrubs, such as pruning, fertilization, control of insects and diseases, and tree 
surgery. Field trips will be taken. 

Mr. Cannon 

HRT 481 BREEDING OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The application of genetic and other biological sciences to the improvement of horticultural 

crops. 

Messrs. Galletta, Henderson 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 



HRT 501 RESEARCH PRINCIPLES Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

Investigation of a problem in horticulture under the direction of the instructor. The students 
obtain practice in experimental techniques and procedures, critical review of literature, 
and scientific writing. The problem may last one or two semesters. Credits will be deter- 
mined by the nature of the problem, not to exceed a total of 4 hours. 

Graduate Staff 



Industrial Arts 261 

hrt 521, 522 technology of fruit and vegetable products 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 312 

Comprehensive treatment of principles and methods of preservation of fruits and vege- 
tables, including studies of commercial plant operations, and visits to food processing 
plants. 

Mr. Jones 

HRT 541 (GN 541 or FC 541) PLANT BREEDING METHODS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: GN 512; Recommended: ST 511 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of 

inheritance. 

Messrs. Dudley, Haynes 

HRT 542 (GN 542 or FC 542) PLANT BREEDING FIELD PROCEDURES 2 (0-4) $ 

Prerequisites: HRT 541 or FC 541 or GN 541 

Laboratory and field study of the application of various plant breeding techniques and 
methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Messrs. Dudley, Haynes 

HRT 552 GROWTH OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of the effect of nutrient-elements, water, light, temperature, and growth sub- 
stances on horticultural plants. 

Mr. Schramm 

HRT 562 POST-HARVEST PHYSIOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of chemical and physiological changes that occur during handling, transportation, 
and storage which affect the quality of horticultural crops. Consideration will be given 
to pre and post-harvest conditions which influence these changes. 

Messrs. McCombs, Bollinger 

HRT 581 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior in Horticulture 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems in 
horticulture and related fields. 

Mr. Gardner 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HRT 621 METHODS AND EVALUATION OF HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Principles and methods of research in the field of horticulture and their application to 
the solution of current problems. Critical study and evaluation of scientific publications. 
Compilation, organization, and presentation of data. 

Mr. Cochran 

HRT 641 RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture, consent of Chairman 

Original research on specific problems in fruit, vegetable, and ornamental crops, or in 

food processing. Thesis prepared should be worthy of publication. A maximum of 6 credits 

is allowed toward the Master of Science degree; no limitation on credits in Doctorate 

program. 

Graduate Staff 

HRT 651 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Presentation of scientific articles and special lectures. Students will be required to present 
one or more papers. Attendance of all graduate students is required. 

Graduate Staff 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

IA 100 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ARTS 1 (1-0) f 

A basic course designed to orient the student to college life and to introduce him to the 
philosophy, objectives, and scope of industrial arts as related to teacher education and 
industrial employment. A study of the problems and opportunities in the profession. 

Staff 



262 Industrial Arts 

IA 103 DRAFTING I 3 (1-4) f 

Graphical communication encompassing sketching and instrument drawing. Theory and 
practice taught through the medium of freehand sketching involving oblique, isometric, 
perspective, exploded, assembly, sections, and orthographic projection type drawings. The 
last portion of the course is devoted to instrument drawing. 

Mr. Troxler 

IA 104 DRAFTING II 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: I A 103 

A study of house planning and construction. Investigation of the factors to be considered 
by the consumer in building or buying a house including location, building codes, FHA 
requirements, heating and ventilation, construction details, materials of construction. 
Laboratory work includes the design and drawing of a set of house plans. 

Mr. Troxler 

IA 107 WOODS I 3 (1-4) f 

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of production with hand tools and 
machines. Group and individual problem solving in product design, selection of materials, 
organization of personnel, and laboratory facilities enable students to participate in a 
variety of experiences. 

Mr. Briley 

IA 108 WOODS II 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: I A 107 

This is an advanced course which seeks to develop the students' knowledge and creative 
ability in solving problems using wood and related materials as the media. An opportunity 
will be provided to solve tooling problems as well as increase the individual's proficiency 
with hand and power tools. 

Mr. Briley 

IA 203 TECHNICAL SKETCHING 2 (1-2) s 

Required of students in Wild Life and Furniture Manufacturing 

The application of drawing practices for the layman. Freehand sketching and instrument 
drawing, lettering, pictorial representation, production sketches, template drawing, ex- 
ploded views, shades and shadows. Individual problems and selected graphic representation. 

Mr. Troxler 

IA 205 INDUSTRIAL ARTS DESIGN 2 (1-2) f 

Prerequisites: IA 104, I A 107, IA 206 

A study of design as related to industry and the industrial arts laboratory. Creative design 
and individual expression through problems involving the utilization of industrial materials. 

Mr. Troxler 

IA 206 METAL PROCESSING I 3 (1-4) f 

Fundamentals of metalwork. Hand and machine tool applications. Emphasis on layout, 
orientation to the lathe, milling machine, shaper, surface grinder, and cut-off operations. 
Experiences in bench metal and welding. Study of mass production problems through 
group experience. 

Mr. Moeller 

IA 207 METAL PROCESSING II 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: IA 206 

Fundamentals of foundry and sheet metal in conjunction with experiences of some pre- 
cision using engine lathe, shaper, milling machine, and surface grinder. Analysis of metal 
problems in terms of principle applications and machine scheduling. 

Mr. Moeller 

IA 215 SHEET METAL 1 (0-2) f 

A course designed to provide practical experience in the use of tools, materials and processes 
involved in basic sheet metal fabrication. 

Mr. Moeller 

IA 304 GENERAL SHOP ORGANIZATION 2 (1-2) s 

Prerequisites: I A 104, I A 108, I A 207, IA 307 

Application of principles of industrial processes to general shop organization and opera- 
tion. Analysis of products. Methods, techniques of production of laboratory projects in- 
cluding a variety of materials suitable to varying educational levels. 

Mr. Troxler 

IA 306 GRAPHIC ARTS 3 (1-4) s 

This course is an introduction to the basic printing areas of letterpress, offset, photo- 
printing, silkscreen, and bookbinding. Students will be given the opportunity to develop 
materials for course outlines which may be used when teaching in hte secondary schools. 

Mr. Briley 

I A 307 BASIC ELECTRICITY 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisites: PY 211, PY 212 

The fundamentals of electricity as applied to resistive, inductive, capacitive and magnetic 
circuits. Emphasis are upon applications of electrical principles to light and power circuits, 
automobile circuits, motors, and controls. 

Mr. Young 



Industrial Arts 263 

ia 308 basic electronics a m_^ . 

Prerequisite: IA 307 Kl ~*' * 

The fundamentals of electronics as applied to power supply, amplifier and oscillator cir- 
cuits. Applications of electronic principles as found in the super-hetrodyne radio are studied. 

Mr. Young 

IA 314 RECREATIONAL ARTS AND CRAFTS 2 (1-2) s 

Required of juniors in industrial and Rural Recreation; elective for others 
A course designed to give students interested in recreational work an understanding of 
and experiences in different types of arts and crafts. Emphasis will be given to a wide 
vonety of crafts as adaptable to camps, city, industrial and institutional programs. 

Staff 

IA 315 GENERAL CERAMICS 3 (1 ^ } f s 

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to work with ceramic materials 
as a medium of expression and to get experience in the basic manufacturing processes 
ot the ceramic industry. Emphasis will be given to a study of the sources of clay design- 
ing, forming, decorating and firing of ceramic products. 

Mr. Hostetler 

IA 321 METALWORK TECHNOLOGY 2 (1 2) * « 

Prerequisites: I A 206, IA 207 or equivalent 

Applications of principles of industrial techniques and processes to the development and 

construction of products and equipment utilizing a variety of industrial materials Emphasis 

will be given to research, problem investigation related to design, function and production 

procedures. 

Mr. Moeller 

IA 465 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 6 f 

A course designed to develop problem-solving ability through research activities in indus- 
trial arts. Problems in industrial arts curriculum, method and content are carefully selected 
designs or plans of action are prepared, and final papers are presented and defended 
before a faculty committee. 

Staff 

IA 480 MODERN INDUSTRIES 3 (3 0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

An overview of the function and organization of modern industry. Principles of work 
simplification, motion economy, processing, and scheduling are reviewed. The effects of 
technological change on labor, management, and consumer are considered. Attention will 
be focused on contributions of technology to specific industrial processes in machining 
forming, fabricating in relationship to principles, types of equipment and usage areas. ' 

Mr. Young 

IA 484 SCHOOL SHOP PLANNING AND EQUIPMENT SELECTION 3 (3-0) s 

A course for advanced undergraduate students 

The physical planning of school shops and laboratories; selection of tools and equipment 
Whenever possible, actual or contemplated school buildings will be used for class work! 

Mr. Hostetler 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IA 510 DESIGN FOR INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHERS 3 n^\ 

Prerequisites: 6 hours of Drawing and IA 205 or equivalent 

A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on the relationship of 

material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts projects. 

Graduate Staff 

IA 570 LABORATORY PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS A maximum of 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, permission of instructor "* '** 

Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors in industrial 
arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge and abilities 
through investigation and research in the various fields of industrial arts such as metals 
plastics, or ceramics. '"* 

Staff 
IA 575 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS A maximum of 

Prerequisite: One term of student teaching or equivalent "* ' * 

The Purpose of these courses is to broaden the subject matter experiences in the areas 
ot industrial arts Problems involving experimentation, investigation and research in one 
or more industrial arts areas will be required. 

Graduate Staff 



264 Industrial Engineering 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

IE 201 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

An intensive and integrated study of the factory as a producing unit. History of manu- 
facturing; organization structure; analysis of products; establishment and evaluation of 
processes; motion study; plant layout; production planning, scheduling, and control. Course 
will include solution of case problems and plant visits. 

IE 202 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: IE 201; Continuation of IE 201. 

IE 217 MACHINE TOOLS 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

One session two hours each week consisting of lecture, demonstrations, and student pro- 
jects. Dimensional control, press forming, power cutting of metals including turning, milling, 
shaping and finishing. Selection and use of cutting tools, speeds, and feeds. 

IE 218 METAL FORMING 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

One session two hours each week consisting of lecture, demonstrations, and outside assign- 
ments. Survey of metals, pattern making, foundry practice, die and permanent mold cast- 
ing, forging, gas cutting, gas and arc welding. 

IE 224 WOOD WORKING EQUIPMENT 3 (3-0) s 

Classwork covers the description of cutting, sanding and assembly equipment, and an 
explanation of the type of operation done by each kind of equipment. The theory of cutting 
and sanding and cutterhead and saw design are covered. 

IE 241 WELDING LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisite: IE 218 or permission of instructor 

A study of mechanization as applied to oxygen cutting, to the various types of shielded 
metal arcs and to gas welding. Jigs, fixtures, and positioners. Selection of welding process. 
Joint design and welding costs. Welds and stress distribution. 

IE 269 WELDING AND PIPE SHOPWORK 1 (0-3) f s 

Required of sophomores in Heating and Air Conditioning 

Fundamentals of welding, both arc and gas, cutting equipment; safety in the use of 
equipment; application of low temperature and non-ferrous alloys; cutting, threading, ream- 
ing, and erection of iron pipe; copper tubes and fittings in heating and air conditioning 
work. 

IE 301 ENGINEERING ECONOMY 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Economics of industrial enterprises. Evaluation of alternatives. Time value of money. 
Concepts of incremental cost and economic break-even point. Capital investment deprecia- 
tion, useful life, sunk cost. Equipment replacement and modernization. Investment criteria 
under conditions of uncertainty. 

IE 303 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING III 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: IE 202 

An intensive and integrated course in methods of obtaining maximum effectiveness from 
the human resources used in the factory: principles of personnel administration, time study 
and rate setting, job evaluation and wage incentives, principles of control of labor and 
other costs. 

IE 304 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING IV 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: IE 303; Continuation of IE 303 

IE 310 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 2 (2-0) f s 

A course in the causes and prevention of industrial accidents. 

IE 322 FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 2 (0-6) 

An introduction to furniture drawing and construction. Detailed drawings and bills of 
material are made by the students from samples and from designers sketches. In con- 
struction, emphasis is placed upon satisfactory performance under variable atmospheric 
moisture, upon adequate strength and rigidity and upon low cost. 

IE 326 FURNITURE MANUFACTURE AND PROCESSING 4 (3-3) « 

Prerequisite: IE 322; Corequisites: IE 332 or IE 202, FOR 203 

A study of the production methods of the Furniture Industry. Class work includes the pro- 
duction procedures from the yard through the machine, cabinet, finishing, upholstering, 
and shipping departments. The laboratory period is supplemented by visits to furniture 
plants. Particular attention is paid to production rates by departments, based on number 
of men and supervisors, the quality of product produced, and equipment used. 

IE 327 FURNITURE MARKETING 2 (2-0) f 

Study of basic factors bearing on selection of ideal location, equipment, and organization 
to serve a specific market with a specific factory. In addition to lectures, each student 
will select one project for which he will work out a solution for correlating product and 
market. 



Industrial Engineering 265 

ie 328 manufacturing processes 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: IE 217, IE 218 

The basic processes of conversion of raw materials into producer and consumer goods. The 
cost reduction aspects of machine tools, jigs, and fixtures in volume productions. Study of 
industrial trends to meet needs of an expanding economy. Selected problems illustrating 
a wide variety of manufacturing situations. 

IE 332 MOTION AND TIME STUDY 4 (3-3) f • 

Prerequisite: Junior standing; Corequisite: EC 425 

Principles and techniques of motion and time study, detailed study of charting operator 
movements; micromotion study. Predetermined time data and its applications; stopwatch 
time study with emphasis on rating, allowances and standard data theory and practice. 

IE 334 MOTION AND TIME STUDY 3 (0-3) f 

A course designed for non-industrial engineering students. Principles and techniques of 
motion and time study. Types and uses of predetermined time systems; stopwatch time 
study, principles and methods of rating, application of allowances and standard data. 

IE 341 FURNITURE PLANT LAYOUT AND DESIGN 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: IE 326 

Problems in industrial plant design with special reference to furniture manufacture; build- 
ing structures, equipment location, space utilization, layout for operation and control; 
allied topics in power utilization, light, heat, ventilation, and safety. Laboratory period. 

IE 343 PLANT LAYOUT AND MATERIALS HANDLING 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 332 

Problems in plant arrangement and layout to obtain most effective utilization of men, 
materials, and machines as related to space and costs. Includes consideration of heat, light, 
ventilation, organization, control, material flow and handling, working conditions, safety, 
and other factors as they affect the most satisfactory layout of the plant. 

IE 346 FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION II 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: IE 322 

Lecture and laboratory work on the design and construction of modern and period furni- 
ture. The course emphasizes construction features that are economical of labor and materials 
and are adaptable to mass production. The course covers the use of new engineering 
materials and their effect on furniture construction. 

IE 350 MECHANISMS AND MACHINE DESIGN 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisites: IE 217, IE 218; Corequisite: EM 343 

Fundamental principles of stress, strain, deflection of beams, combined stresses and strains, 
shafts, spring, gears, linkages, and cams, with emphasis on applications to jig and fixtures 
design and special tooling. 

IE 401 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) * 

Prerequisite: IE 304, MA 301, MA 405, ST 362 

An introductory course in some of the more recently developed operations research tech- 
niques; applications of analysis of variance, multiple correlation and other statistical 
methods, queueing theory, linear programming; graphical methods of solutions; information 
theory and servomechanisms in Industrial Engineering. A balance will be sought between 
theory and practical applications. 

IE 402 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: IE 401; Continuation of IE 401 

IE 404 INTRODUCTION TO TOOL ENGINEERING 3 (2-3) • 

Prerequisites: IE 217, IE 218, EM 343 

The development of effective production process design through a study of theory and 
characteristics of material removal and forming processes; with emphasis on quality re- 
quirements of the product, operations study, and the economics of tooling. 

IE 408 PRODUCTION CONTROL 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Planning, scheduling, and dispatching of production in manufacturing operations; con- 
version of sales requirements into production orders; construction of production budgets 
and their relation to labor, materials and machines; laboratory project involving the devel- 
opment and operation of the production control system of a typical plant. 

IE 425 SALES AND DISTRIBUTION METHODS 2 (2-0) s 

An analysis of the distribution of industrial and consumer products; the effect of increased 
productivity on sales and distribution channels; development and marketing of new products, 
merchandising and packaging. Sales training and sales engineering programs. 

IE 430 JOB EVALUATION AND WAGE ADMINISTRATION 3 (2-3) t 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Job analysis, classification and specification. Grading, ranking, factor comparison and 
point systems of job evaluation in determining equitable rates for job content. Wage 
surveys and merit rating. Utilization of time standards in design, installation, and operation 
of financial incentive plans. Comparison of various wage and solary plans. Effect of wage 
payment methods on industrial relations practices. 



266 Industrial Engineering 

ie 443 quality control 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Economic balance between cost of quality and value of quality, and techniques for accom- 
plishing this balance. Organization for, specification and utilization of quality controls. 
Statistical theory and analyses as applied to sampling, control charts, tolerance determina- 
tion, acceptance procedures and control of production. 

IE 451, 452 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

A weekly meeting of senior students to assist the transition from a college environment to 
that of industry. Lectures, problems, presentation of papers, and outside speakers. Employ- 
ment practices and procedures useful in job finding. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE 515 PROCESS ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 401, IE 443 

The technical process of translating product design into a manufacturing program. The 

application of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, methods, standards, costs, and 

control functions of manufacturing. Laboratory problems covering producer and consumer 

products. 

IE 517 AUTOMATIC PROCESSES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 401, IE 443 

Principles and methods for automatic processing. The design of product, process, and 
controls. Economic, physical, and sociological effects of automation. 

IE 521 CONTROL SYSTEMS AND DATA PROCESSING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 401 

This course is designed to train the student in the problem and techniques required for 
systematic control of the production process and the business enterprise. This includes 
training in the determination of control factors, the collection and recording of data, and 
the processing, evaluation, and use of data. The course will illustrate the applications 
and use of data processing equipment and information machines in industrial processes. 
Case problems will be used extensively. 

IE 531 QUANTITATIVE JOB EVALUATION METHODS 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

A study of statistical and mathematical methods of testing and designing job evaluation 
plans. Ranking, contingency, and analysis of variance methods of testing plans and rating 
performance. Multiple regression and linear programming methods of designing plans. 

IE 543 STANDARD DATA 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 361 or ST 515, one course in motion and time study 
Theory and practice in developing standard data from stopwatch observations and pre- 
determined time data; methods of calculating standards from data; application of stan- 
dard data in cost control, production planning and scheduling, and wage incentives. 

IE 551 STANDARD COSTS FOR MANUFACTURING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: One course in accounting and one course in motion and time study 
The development, application and use of standard costs as a management tool; use of 
industrial engineering techniques in establishing standard costs for labor, material, and 
overhead. Analysis of variances and setting of budgets. Measures of management per- 
formance. 

IE 581 PROJECT WORK 2 to 6 f s 

Investigation and report on an assigned problem for students enrolled in the fifth-year 
curriculum in Industrial Engineering. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IE 621 INVENTORY CONTROL METHODS 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisites: IE 402, IE 521, MA 511 

A study of inventory policy with respect to reorder sizes, minimum points, and production 
schedules. Simple inventory models with restrictions, price breaks, price changes, analysis 
of slow-moving inventories. Introduction to the smoothing problem in continuous manu- 
facturing. Applications of linear and dynamic programming and zero-sum game theory. 

IE 651 SPECIAL STUDIES INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups of students to 
take on studies of special areas in Industrial Engineering which fit into their particular 
program and which may not be covered by existing industrial engineering graduate level 
courses. The work would be directed by a qualified staff member who has particular 
interest in the area covered by the problem. Such problems may require individual re- 
search and initiative in the application of industrial engineering training to new areas or 
fields. 



Mathematics 267 

ie 671 seminar 1-1 

Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for graduote students. Case analyses 
and reports. 

IE 691 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Graduate research in Industrial Engineering for thesis credit. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

LA 301, 302 LANDSCAPE DESIGN I, II 5 (3-9) f s 

Prerequisite: ARC 202 

Required of third year students in Landscape Architecture 

The landscape survey, investigation, and analysis. Use of first and second year design 

principles in specific landscape architecture problems. Covers the small scale design section 

in the complete third, fourth, and fifth year landscape cycle. 

Mr. Thurlow 

LA 311, 312 LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION I, II 4 (2-6) f s 

Required of third year students in Landscape Architecture 

The physical elements of landscape design, particularly earthwork, grading, quantities, 
construction, horizontal and vertical alignment of roads, and principles of statics. Lecture 
and laboratory work dealing with landscape structural analysis and materials, surface drain- 
age and run-off, under-drainage; external lighting, water supply, woste, sanitation treat- 
ment, and fire protection. 

Mr. Clarke 

LA 401, 402 LANDSCAPE DESIGN III, IV 6 (3-9) f s 

Prerequisite: LA 302 

Required of students in Landscape Architecture. 

Regional survey investigation and analysis. Site planning and environmental dseign. Covers 

the medium scale design section in the complete third, fourth, and fifth year design cycle. 

(Correlation with LA Construction and LA Planting Design courses.) 

Mr. Thurlow 

LA 421, 422 PLANTING DESIGN 4 (2-6) f s 

Prerequisites: HRT 202, LA 302, LA 312 

Required of students in Landscape Architecture 

The appraisal of plants as objects of design and their orderly arrangement for landscape 

effect. Techniques for recording design, specifications, and cost estimates. (Correlation with 

Landscape Design and Landscape Construction courses.) 

Mr. Thurlow 

LA 501, 502 LANDSCAPE DESIGN V, VI 6,8 (4-8) f s 

Prerequisite: LA 402 

Required of 5th year students in Landscape Architecture 

Large scale landscape design and ecological planning, analysis, and investigation. At least 

one research or thesis project. 

Mr. Thurlow 

LA 511 LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION III 4 (2-6) f 

Prerequisite: LA 312 

Required of fifth year students in Landscape Architecture 

Landscape structures, materials, and construction continued from LA 312. Office practice, 

procedure, ethics, and law; contracts, specifications, and bidding. 

Mr. Clarke 



MATHEMATICS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 101 ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY 5 (4-2) f s 

Topics include: systems of equations involving quadratics, inequalities, variation, binomial 
theorem, progressions; logarithms, linear equations and determinants, theory of equations; 
trigonometric functions of general angle, identities and multiple angle relations, radian 
measure, inverse trigonometric functions, solution of triangles with emphasis on laws of 
sines and cosines. 



268 Mathematics 

ma 102 analytic geometry and calculus i 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 

Required of freshman in the Schools of Engineering and Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics. The first of three semesters of a united course in analytic geometry and 
calculus. Topics studied include rectangular coordinates in the plane with graphs and 
equations of lines, algebraic curves, including the conic sections and others examined by 
general discussion methods. Also introduced are functions, limits, continuity, differentiation 
of algebraic functions, with applications of derivatives and differentials. 

MA 111 ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY 4 (3-2) f s 

Exponents and radicals, fractions, quadratic equations in one and two unknowns, radical 
equations, logarithms, progressions, binomial theorem, solution of higher degree equations 
by linear interpolation, the trigonometric functions, the solution of right triangle by tables 
and slide rule, simple identities and equations, the oblique triangle. 

MA 112 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS A 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 101 

A unified course, beginning with elementary ideas in analytic geometry and calculus, 
with the introduction of additional work in trigonometry where needed; rectangular and 
polar coordinate systems, fundamental locus problems, lines and conic sections, curve 
tracing, the derivative, with applications to geometry and simple practical problems. 

MA 122 MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE AND ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 or MA 111 

Simple and compound interest, annuities and their applications to amortization and sinking 
fund problems, installment buying, calculation of premiums of life annuities and life 
insurance, elementary statistics. 

MA 201 ANALTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS II 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 102 (with a minimum grade of C) 

Required of sophomores in the Schools of Engineering and Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics. The second of three semesters of a united course in analytic geometry and 
calculus. Topics studied include indefinite and definite integrals of algebraic functions and 
their applications; differentiation of transcendental functions; polar coordinates, para- 
metric equations, curvilinear motion and curvature; formal integration; integration by 
parts, substitution, and partial fractions. 

MA 202 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS III 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

Required of sophomores in the Schools of Engineering and Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics. The third of three semesters of unified course in anlaytic geometry and 
calculus. Topics studied include areas, volumes, lengths of curves, centroids, moments of 
inertia in rectangular and polar coordinates; approximate integration, improper integrals, 
indeterminate forms; infinite series and expansion of functions; solid analytic geometry 
and partial differentiation, multiple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical 
coordinates. 

MA 211, 212 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS B, C 3 (2-2) f « 

Prerequisite: MA 112 

An integrated course in the fundamentals of calculus, including formal differentiation and 
integration. Basic applications to geometry, rates, maxima and minima, areas, volumes, 
first and second moments and centroids are included. Additional topics from analytic 
geometry, not covered in MA 112, are introduced as needed as a basis for calculus. 

MA 215 INTRODUCTION TO FINITE MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 21 1 or equivalent 

This course includes the following related topics: Elementary symbolic logic and truth 
tables, introduction to sets and subsets, other number systems, the partitioning of sets, 
introduction to probability theory and finite Stochastic processes, elementary linear pro- 
gramming and game theory. 

MA 301 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 

First order equations with variables separable; Euler's method of approximate solution; 
physical and geometrical applications. Linear equations of first order; applications. Linear 
equations of higher order with constant coefficients, solution by repeated linear first order 
equations, variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients, operators. Systems of 
equations; scaling variables, applications to networks and dynamical systems. Introduction 
to series-solutions; solutions by use of analog computer. 

MA 302 THEORY OF EQUATIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 

Algebraic equations; isolation of roots, numerical approximations to roots, the Graeffe 
method; application of approximation procedures to transcendental equations; systems of 
linear equations, determinants and introduction to matrix theory. 



Mathematics 269 

ma 303 differential equations and infinite series 4 (4-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (Superior Student Program) 

Infinite series and Taylor expansions. First order equations with variables separable; 
Euler's method of approximate solution; physical and geometrical applications. Linear 
equations of first order; applications. Linear equations of higher order with constant co- 
efficients, solution by repeated linear first order equations, variation of parameters, 
undertermined coefficients, operators. Systems of equations; scaling variables, applica- 
tions to networks and dynamical systems. Introduction to series-solutions; solutions by 
use of analog computer; non-linear differential equations; demensional analysis. (Students 
are to take either MA 301 or 303, but not both.) 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE 

MA 403 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ALGEBRA 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212 

Integers; integral domains; rational numbers; fields, rings, groups. Boolean algebra. 

MA 404 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF GEOMETRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Foundations of geometry; laws of logic; affine geometry; geometric transformations; 

homogeneous coordinates; comparison of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. 

MA 405 INTRODUCTION TO DETERMINANTS AND MATRICES 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Properties of determinants, theorems of Laplace and Jacobi; systems of linear equations. 
Elementary operations with matrices; inverse, rank, characteristic roots and eigenvectors. 
Introduction to algebraic forms. 

MA 411 INTRODUCTIONS TO APPLIED MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Infinite series, introduction to Fourier series, special functions defined by integrals, line 

and multiple integrals, partial differentiation, and a brief treatment of vector analysis. 

MA 433 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Evolution of the number system; trends in the development of modern mathematics; 
lives and contributions of outstanding mathematicians. 

Mr. Nolstad 

MA 491 READING IN HONORS MATHEMATICS 2 to 6 

Prerequisite: Membership in Honors Program and permission of Department Chairman. 
This is a reading course for exceptionally able students at the junior and senior levels. 
It will follow the English precedent in university education so that the student will read 
in some area of advanced mathematics, will present a written report of his reading, and 
will stand an examination on it. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 501 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Numerical solution of equations, introduction to theory of random errors, least squares 
and curve fitting, finite-difference tables and the theory of interpolation, numerical 
integration, numerical differentiation, and elements of difference calculus. Some methods 
will be presented for use in hand caculations and others for digital computer solution. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 502 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: MA 501, MA 511 

Summation of series, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, solution of 
systems of linear equations, and numerical solution of partial differential equations. Pre- 
sentation of sources of error in numerical computation and brief analyses will be included 
in the various numerical procedures. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 511 ADVANCED CALCULUS I 3 (3-0) f i 

Prerequisite: MA 301, B-average in Mathematics 

This two-semester sequence, MA 511 and MA 512, is intended as foundation mathematics 
for graduate study in Engineering, Physics, or Applied Mathematics. Number system, 
sequences, limits, continuity; derivatives, differentials. Functions of several variables, 
limits and continuity, partial differentiation, Jacobians; directional derivatives. Riemann 
integral, multiple integrals, Green's theorem. 

Graduate Staff 



270 Mathematics 

MA 512 ADVANCED CALCULUS II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 51 1 

Line integrals and applications. Infinite series, review of convergence tests, uniform 
convergence, powers series and applications. Fourier series. Improper integrals. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 514 BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) f 

Corequisite: MA 512 . . 

Ordinary homogeneous and non-homogeneous differential equations with boundary values; 
elements of partial differential equations; applications of Fourier series and other methods 
to the solutions of certain boundary value problems in partial differential equations; 
harmonic functions. _ _. „ 

Graduate Staff 

MA 517 INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: B+ average in MA 511 and MA 512 

A study of basic set-theoretic and general topological notions of modern mathematics. 
Topics include set theory and cardinal numbers, topological spaces, metric spaces, and 
elementary discussion of function spaces. 

MA 521 ADVANCED GEOMETRY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 202, MA 405 

Coorainates in space; direction angles and cosines; planes, lines, points; matrices, sur- 
faces and curves; quadric surfaces; transformation; analysis of general equation of degree 
2- matrix algebra and its applications; introduction to algebraic geometry. 

Messrs. Clarkson, Nahikian 

MA 522 THEORY OF PROBABILITY I 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Definitions, discrete and continuous sample spaces, combinatorial analysis, Stirling s 
formula, simple occupancy and ordering problems, conditional probability, repeated trials, 
compound experiments, Bayes' theorem, binomial, Poisson and normal distributions, the 
probability integral, random variables, expectation. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 523 THEORY OF PROBABILITY II 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 522 

Binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions; law of large numbers; recurrent events; re- 
newal theory; Markov chains. Characteristic function and distribution functions; simple 
stochastic processes. Introduction to game theory and linear programming. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 532 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 301, "B" average in mathematics 

Solution of second order linear equations with variable coefficients; exact equations; 
Green's functions; singular points and series solutions; Bessel functions, Legendre poly- 
nomials, and other special functions defined by ordinary differential equations; approxi- 
mate methods; introduction to partial differential equations. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 535 AN INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and either 405 or one 500-level course 

The elements of number systems and commonly used machine codes; fundamental coding 
and programming techniques for the IBM 650. Selected problems are subjected to numeri- 
cal and error analysis and solved on the IBM 650. The elements of the theory and 
applications of the analog computer, solutions of certain differential systems on the 
Donner analog computer. 

Messrs. Caldwell, Wilson 

MA 541 VECTOR ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and either 405 or one 500-level course 

The algebra of vectors and dyadics; elementary space geometry in vector form; scalar 
and vector differentiation of scalar, vector and dyadic functions; curvilinear coordinates; 
line surface, and volume integrals; integral transformations; applications. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 543 ELEMENTARY COMPLEX VARIABLE THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 511 or MA 532 . 

Operations with complex numbers; derivatives, analytic functions, integrals, definitions 
and properties of elementary functions, multiple-value functions, power series, residue 
theory and applications, conformal mapping. 

Messrs. Bullock, Mumford, Winton 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 602 PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Partial differentiation, functional dependence, envelopes, eliminants, Lagrange s equation, 
general and complete integrals, non-linear equations of first and higher orders; Fourier 
series with applications to problems in vibrations, heat and fluid flow, electricity; boundary 
value problems. _ 

Mr. Struble 



Mathematics 271 

ma 605 non-linear differential equations 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532 

Non-linear differential equations associated with important physical systems; contrasts 
with linear system; use of phase plane diagrams and other geometrical methods of analy- 
sis, approximate solutions by perturbation, Fourier series, slow variations of amplitude 
and phase, linearized equations, and computer methods; study of limit cycles and stability. 

Mr. Strubfe 

MA 608 INTEGRAL EQUATIONS Alternate Summers 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532 

Linear Volterra integral equations of the first and second kinds. Relationship to linear 
differential initial value problems. Special Volterra equations of the convolution type. 
Singular Volterra equations. Linear Fredholm integral equations of the first and second 
kind. Basic theory. Symmetric kernels. Hilbert-Schmidt theory (generalizations). 

MA 611 COMPLEX VARIABLE THEORY AND APPLICATIONS I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Elementary functions; analytic functions and Cauchy-Riemann equations; conformal map- 
ping and applications; Taylor and Laurent series; contour integration and residue theory; 
the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. 

Mr. Bullock 

MA 612 COMPLEX VARIABLE THEORY AND APPLICATIONS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prereqjisite: MA 61 1 

Conformal mapping and applications to flow phenomena; multiple-valued functions and 
Riemann surfaces; further applications of residue theory; analytic continuation; infinite 
series and asymptotic expansions; elliptic functions and other special functions in the 
complex domain; structure of functions. 

Mr. Bullock 

MA 615 THEORY OF FUNCTIONS OF A REAL VARIABLE I Alternate Years 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Sets and spaces; continuity and differentiability of real functions. 

Messrs. Harrington, Kassimatis 

MA 616 THEORY OF FUNCTIONS OF A REAL VARIABLE II Alternate Years 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 615 

Measure, measurable sets and functions, theory of Lebesque integration. 

Messrs. Harrington, Kassimatis 

MA 621 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

A study of the abstract structure and properties of groups, rings and ideals, and fields. 

Messrs. Nahikian, Park 

MA 622 VECTOR SPACES AND MATRICES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 511 

Introduction to matrices; vector spaces; equivalence, rank, inverse of matrices; determinants; 
congruence; gradratic forms; polynomials over a field; similarity; characteristic roots. 

Messrs. Nahikian, Park 

MA 625 INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY Aleternate Summers 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Theory of curves and surfaces in 3-dimensional euciidean space with special reference 
to those properties invariant under the rigid body motions. 

Messrs. Levine, Winton 

MA 632 OPERATIONAL MATHEMATICS I 3 (3-0) t 

Corequisite: MA 543 or MA 61 1 

Laplace transform with theory and application to problems in ordinary and partial differ- 
ential equations arising from engineering and physics problems; Fourier integral and 
Fourier transforms and applications. 

Mr. Cell 

MA 633 OPERATIONAL MATHEMATICS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 632 

Extended development of the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their uses in the solu- 
tion of problems in ordinary and partial differential equations and in difference equations; 
Sturm-Liouville systems; advanced theory in ordinary and partial differential equations; 
other infinite and finite transforms and their applications. 

Mr. Cell 

MA 635 MATHEMATICS OF COMPUTERS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: MA 502, MA 512, MA 535; Corequisite: MA 405 or MA 622 
The development of methods for the solution of selected problems involving matrices; 
integral rational equations; ordinary and partial differential equations. Particular attention 
is paid to the question of convergence and stability; examples solved on the IBM 650. 

Mr. Caldwell 



272 Mechanical Engineering 

MA 641 CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS Alternate Summers 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The simplest problem of the calculus of variations in detail; variable endpoints; iso-peri- 
metric problems; Hamilton's principle; least action principle; introduction to the theory 
of linear integral equations of the Volterra and Fredholm types. 

Mr. Winton 

MA 651 EXPANSION OF FUNCTIONS Alternate Summers 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MA 611, 633 or equivalent 

Expansion of functions of one or more variables in Taylor series; asymptotic series, infinite 
products, partial fractions, continued fractions, series of orthogonal functions; applications 
in ordinary partial differential equations, difference equations and integral equations. 

Messrs. Cell, Harrington 

MA 661 TENSOR ANALYSIS I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 541 

Recommended (but not required) MA 521, 602, 622. The basic theory; tensor algebra, 
tensor calculus; invariant theory; quadratic differential forms; covariant differentiation, 
curvature tensor; geometric applications, Riemannian spaces, parallelism, geodesies, normal 
coordinates; generalized vector analysis; physical applications; dynamics, Lagrange's 
equations, generalized coordinates; the geometry of dynamics; kinematic and action line 
elements, holonomic and non-holonomic systems; configuration space, dynamics in n-di- 
mensions. 

Mr. Levine 

MA 662 TENSOR ANALYSIS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 661 

Continuation of physical applications. Elasticity; finite strains, equations of compatibility, 
strain invariants, stress tensor, equations of motion, generalized Hooke's law, isotropic 
stress-strain relations; hydrodynamics, perfect fluids, viscous fluid, viscosity tensor, equa- 
tions of motion; electromagnetic theory. Maxwell's equations, plane waves, stress-energy 
tensor. 

Mr. Levine 

MA 681 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANALYSIS up to 6 hours credit 

MA 683 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALGEBRA up to 6 hours credit 

MA 685 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUMERICAL ANALYSIS up to 6 hours credit 

MA 687 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOMETRY up to 6 hours credit 

MA 689 SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS up to 6 hours credit 

The above courses, MA 681 -MA 689, afford opportunities for graduate students to study 
advanced topics in mathematics under the direction of members of the graduate staff. 
These will on occasion consist of one of several areas such as, for example, advanced 
theory of partial differential equations, topology, mathematics of plasticity or of viscoelas- 
ticity, mathematics of orbital mechanics. 

MA 691 RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of adviser 
Individual research in the field of mathematics. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ME 101, ME 102 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I, II 2 (1-3) f s 

Corequisite: MA 101, or MA 111 

The objective of these courses is to teach the student the proper methods, techniques, 
and procedures of expression and interpreting data in this medium of communication. 
Theories and common practices are used to emphasize instrument practice, geometrical 
construction, freehand technical sketching, completion of prepared worksheets, sections, 
projections, auxiliary views, pictorial views, diagramatic sketches and drawings using 
standard symbols, charts and graphs, and blueprint reading. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon visualization in the analysis and solution of geometrical magnitudes repre- 
sented by points, lines, planes, and solids; intersection and development of flat and 
curved surfaces. 

ME 301 ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 201 

A study of energy and energy transformations; the First and Second Laws applied to 
systems and to control volumes; thermodynamic properties of systems; property changes 
occurring resulting from charges in state; availability of energy. 



Mechanical Engineering 273 

me 302 engineering thermodynamics ii 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

A continuation of engineering thermodynamics I for Mechanical Engineering juniors. 
Thermodynamics of mixtures; chemical thermodynamics; thermodynamics of fluid flow; 
vapor and gas cycles; applications to compressors, internal combustion engines, steam 
and gas turbines, refrigeration. 

ME 303 ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS III 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

A continuation of engineering thermodynamics I for Non-Mechanical Engineering juniors. 
Thermodynamics of mixtures; thermodynamics of fluid flow; heat transfer; vapor and 
gas cycles and applications. 

ME 304 FUNDAMENTALS OF HEAT POWER 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 211 

Energy and energy transformations, including a brief discussion of measurements of quanti- 
ties involved. Properties of working substances, particularly steam. Elementary combustion 
of fuels. Steam power cycles and applications to steam turbines. Elements of Heat Transfer. 

ME 305 EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I 1 (0-3) f 

Corequisite: ME 301 

Theory and principles involved in instrumentation and measurements. Limitation and 
sources of error of each technique studied. Utilization of instrumentation in predetermined 
situations that exhibit the essential characteristics of the instrumentation. Consideration 
of transient and steady state techniques. Areas of study; pyrometric measurements, piezo 
measurements and measurements of flow properties. 

ME 306 EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING II 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: ME 305; Corequisites: EM 321, ME 312 

A continuation of ME 305 with emphasis on measurements of kinematic quantities, measure- 
ments of thermophysical properties and energy measurements. Treatment of experimental 
data. 

ME 311 KINEMATICS 3 (3-0) f 

Corequisite: EM 312 

Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering 

The application of the principles of kinematics to the field of Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 312 DYNAMIC ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 311, MA 301 

Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering 

The application of rational dynamics to the field of Mechanical Engineering; the science 

of motions resulting from any force, and of the forces required to produce motions. 

ME 351 ELEMENTS OF AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 202 
Corerequisite: EM 312 

The airplane and its component parts, terminology, basic fluid mechanics and the prin- 
ciples of flight, airfoil characteristics, and an introduction to performance and stability 
analysis. 

ME 352 AERODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 351, MA 301 

Fundamental concepts underlying experimental aerodynamics, the aerodynamicist's data, 
elementary flow theory, Reynolds number and the effect of viscosity, Mach number and 
compressibility, finite wing theory. 

ME 381, 382 AIR CONDITIONING I, II 3 (3-0) $ f 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

Principles of heating and air conditioning and their applications to the design and opera- 
tion of heating and air conditioning systems; methods of controls of various component 
parts of such systems. 

ME 401 POWER PLANTS 3(3-0) f < 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

A study of the basic technical principles of the transformation of energy into useful forms 

and the study of the fundamental sciences leading to engineering decisions of selection 

and arrongement of energy transforming equipment. Various types and kinds of plants. 

Energy balance and significance upon the proper selection of elements in the power 

plant. Economic selection of components. Factors affecting the cost of power and the 

elements which enter into the problems arriving at monetary electric rates. 

ME 405 EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING III 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: ME 306 ' 

Experimental analysis of engineering systems. Selection of appropriate instrumentation 
and analysis of predetermined small scale engineering systems designed for flexibility 
and wide variation of parameters. Experiments cover the gamut of mechanical engineering 
activity. 



274 Mechanical Engineering 

me 406 experimental mechanical engineering iv 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: ME 405 

Individual or small group investigation of an original problem. A project type of program. 

ME 410 JET PROPULSION 3 '3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 352 or EM 430 

Application of fundamental principles of thermodynamics and the mechanics of a com- 
pressible fluid to the processes of jet-propulsion and turbo-propeller aircraft; the effect 
of performance of components on performance of engine; analysis of engine performance 
parameters. 

ME 411 MACHINE DESIGN I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 312, EM 321 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

Basic principles of the mechanical sciences applied to the analysis of machines, devices, 

and mechanical systems. State of stress, state of strain, elasticity, working stresses, stress 

concentration, fatigue, impact and shock, plasticity, thermal stress, wear, lubrication and 

contact stress. 

ME 412 MACHINE DESIGN II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 41 1 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

Synthesis of machines, devices, and machanical systems. The specification of systems, 

formulation of region of design, synthesis of elements, complete analysis of the ensemble, 

evaluation and closure of the design. Project activity with research emphasis. 

ME 435 INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATIC CONTROLS 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301 

Introduction to concept of automatic controls; fundamentals of two-position, proportional, 
floating and rate modes of control with a graphical and analytical presentation of each. 
Theoretical considerations of the process and an introduction to system analysis. 

ME 441 TECHNICAL SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: Graduating Senior standing 

Meetings once a week for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics of cur- 
rent interest in Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 453 APPLIED AERODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Determination of design data, tunnel wall and ground effect interference corrections, 
spanwise and chordwise load distributions, performance estimation, and stabilty and 
control analysis. Attention is given to transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. 

ME 455, 456 AERONAUTICAL LABORATORY I, II 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 351 

Demonstration of wind tunnel testing methods and principles of fluid motion. Aerodynamic 
tests of airplane components and complete models. Calbiration of instruments and other 
laboratory exercise related to aeronautical engineering. 

ME 459 AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 351, EM 321 

Theory of aircraft structures, design principles and methods of stress analysis, emphasis 
on thin-walled structures. 

ME 461, 462 AIRPLANE DESIGN I, II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisites: For ME 461, ME 351; for ME 462, ME 461, 459 

Design procedure, preliminary layout from design specifications, weight and balance per- 
formance estimation, control and stability analysis, principles of stress analysis. 

ME 473 REFRIGERATION 2 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

The fundamental principles of refrigeration, the performance of various types of refrigerat- 
ing machines and their applications to air conditioning; controls of such systems. 

ME 481, 482 AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN I, II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 381 

The design, layout and cost estimates of various types of heating and air conditioning 

systems. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ME 501 STEAM AND GAS TURBINES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and EM 430 or ME 352 

Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbomachinery flow passages: control 
and performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine processes. 

ME 502 HEAT TRANSFER 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301 

A study of the fundamental laws of heat transfer by conducting convection and radiation; 
steady and unsteady states heat transfer. 



Mechanical Engineering 275 

me 507, 508 internal combustion engine fundamentals 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

The fundamentals common to internal combustion engine cycles of operation. The Otto 
engine: carburetion, fuel distribution, flame propagation, normal and knocking combustion, 
throttling, pumping, valve and spark timing, and altitude effects; the Diesel engine: 
injection and spray formation fuel rating, atomization, penetration, diesel knock, combus- 
tion, precombustion, and scavenging as applied to reciprocating and rotary engines. 

ME 515 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: ME 312 

Theoretical and experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis, with experimental 
emphasis on electrical strain gages and instrumentation, brittle coatings, grid methods, 
and photoelasticity. Laboratory includes a full experimental investigation and report of 
a problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

ME 516 PHOTOELASTICITY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ME 515 

Two and three-dimensional photoelasticity; the stress-optic law, isochromatics, isoclinics, 
stress trajectories, fractional orders of interference; three dimensional techniques, oblique 
incidence, rotational and thickness effects; determination of principal stresses at interior 
points; laboratory investigations. 

ME 517 LUBRICATION 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 430 

The theory of hydrodynamic lubrication; Reynolds' equation, the Sommerfeld integration, 
effect of variable lubricant properties and energy equation for temperature rise. Properties 
of lubricants. Application to design of bearings. Boundary lubrication. 

ME 521 AEROTHERMODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301, EM 430 

An examination of the basic concepts of gas dynamics such as the continuum, domain 
of applicability of continuum, acoustic velocity, compressibility effects, and the conser- 
vation laws. Analysis of one dimensional flows such as isentropic flow, diabatic flow, 
flow with friction, the normal shock. An introduction to the vector formulation of multi- 
dimensional problems. 

ME 545, 546 PROJECT WORK IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I, II 2 (0-4) f or s 

Individual or small group investigation of a problem stemming from a mutual student- 
faculty interest. Emphasis is placed on providing a situation for exploiting student curiosity. 

ME 551 FLYING QUALITIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Evaluation of flying qualities of airplanes, important factors and criteria for design, 
analysis of stick-fixed and stick-free control and stability, maneuvering stability, lateral 
controllability, and stick force determination. 

ME 552 AIRCRAFT APPLIED LOADS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 453 

Determination of aerodynamics loads, maneuvering and gust loads, V-g diagram, spanwise 
distributions on unswept and swept wings, dynamic flight loads. Consideration of the 
load modifications in the transonic flight range. 

ME 553 PROPELLER AND ROTARY WING DESIGN 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

A study of the design of aircraft propellers and rotary wing theory and design. Discussion 

of problems of performance evaluation, control and stability, as applied to rotating wing 

aircraft. 

ME 554 ADVANCED AERODYNAMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 453 

Development of fundamental aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analysis 
and derivation of equations of motion, airfoil theory and comparison with experimental 
results. Introduction to supersonic flow theory. 

ME 562 ADVANCED AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES 3 (3-0) s 

Development of methods of stress analysis for aircraft structures, special problems in 
structural design, stiffened panels, rigid frames, indeterminate structures, general relaxa- 
tion theory. 

ME 571 AIR CONDITIONING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A fundamental study of summer and winter air conditioning including temperature, 
humidity, air velocity and distribution. 

ME 572 REFRIGERATION 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A thermodynamic analysis of the simple, compound, centrifugal and multiple effect com- 
pression systems, the steam jet system and the absorption system of refrigeration. 



276 Mechanical Engineering 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ME 601 ADVANCED ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 302 or ME 303 

First and Second Laws; theory of variable specific heats; general equations of thermody- 
namics; characteristic equations of state; reduced coordinates; prediction of properties of 
gases and vapors; chemical equilibrium; metastable states; thermodynamics of fluid flow. 

ME 602 STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 601, MA 511 

Fundamental principles of kinetic theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and 
irreversibly phenomena with particular reference to thermodynamic systems and processes. 
The conclusions of the classical thermodynamics are analyzed and established from the 
macroscopic viewpoint. 

ME 603 ADVANCED POWER PLANTS 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: ME 401 

A critical analysis of the energy balance of thermal power plants; thermodynamics and 
economic evaluation of alternate schemes of development; study of recent developments 
in the production of power. 

ME 604 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 302, 502, EM 430, PY 419 

Resources of fuels, power reactors, reactor materials and properties, coolants, pumps, 
heat exchangers, nuclear gas turbine power plants, nuclear steam power plants, special 
purpose plants, the economics of nuclear power and selected topics on shielding, waste 
disposal and health precautions. 

ME 605 AEROTHERMOCHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 601, MA 511 or equivalent 

A generalized treatment of combustion thermodynamics including derivation of thermo- 
dynamics quantities by the method of Jacobians, criteria for thermodynamic equilibrium, 
computation of equilibrium composition and ediabatic flame temperature. Introduction 
to classical chemical kinetics. Conservation equations for a reacting system, detonation 
and deflagration. Theories of flame propagation, flame stabilization, and turbulent com- 
bustion. 

ME 606 ADVANCED GAS DYNAMICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 521, ME 601, MA 511 

The general conservation equations of gas dynamics from a differential and integral 
point of view. Hyperbolic compressible flow equations, unsteady one-dimensional flows, the 
non-linear problem of shock wave formation, isentrophic plane flow, flow in nozzles and 
jets, turbulent flow. 

W. T. Snyder 

ME 608 ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 502 or equivalent 

Fundamental aspects, from an advanced viewpoint, will be considered in the conduction 
of heat through solids, convective phenomena, and the measurement and prediction of 
appropriate physical properties. Boundary value problems arising in heat conduction will 
be examined and both numerical and function solution techniques developed. Internal 
and external boundary layer analyses will be made on a variety of representative convec- 
tion situations. 

ME 609 ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER II 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisite: ME 608 

Advanced topics in the nonisothermal flow of fluids through channels will be investigated 

for slug, laminar, transitional and turbulent conditions. The influence of mass transfer 

on flow and heat transfer processes will be considered. Radiation exchange processes 

between solid surfaces and solid surfaces and gasses both stationary and moving will be 

discussed. 

ME 611, 612 ADVANCED MACHINE DESIGN I, II 3 (3-0) f « 

Prerequisite: ME 412 

Kinematics of mechanical media, the stress tensor, the tensor of strains, elasticity, plasti- 
city, time-dependent behavior; theories of failure, working stresses; shock and steady 
dynamic loading, creep, stress concentration, thermal stress, contact stresses; energy 
theories, finite difference and relaxation methods, hydrodynamic lubrication. Application 
to the design of machine frames, shafts, bearings, gears, springs, cams, etc. 

ME 613 MECHANICS OF MACHINERY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 312, MA 512 

Vector dynamics, d'Alembert's principle, Lagrange's equations; rigid kinematics, Euler's 
angles, rigid rotation, Coriolis accelerations; the inertia tensor. Application to mechanisms, 
gyroscopes, guidance and control systems, rotating and reciprocating devices. 



Metallurgical Engineering 277 

me 614 mechanical transients and machine vibrations 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 312 or EM 545, MA 512 

Dynamic loads in mechanical media are considered in two categories — steady vibrations 
and transient shock and impact. The Lagrange equations and the wave equation are em- 
ployed to study internal stresses and displacements in mechanical devices which result 
from such loading. 

ME 617 PLATES AND SHELLS IN MECHANICAL DESIGN 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: MA 511, ME 611 

The concept of members which are thin in one dimension, that is, plates and shells, is 
applied to mechanical design with particular emphasis on type of loading, conditions of 
service, and compliance of the members to its environment. 

ME 641, 642 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR I, II 1 to 3 credits f or s 

Faculty and graduate student discussions centered around current research problems and 
advanced engineering theories. 

ME 645 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 3 to 6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in ME and approval of advisor 
Individual research in the field of Mechanical Engineering 

ME 651 PRINCIPLES OF FLUID MOTION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 453 or equivalent; Corequisite: MA 51 1 

Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of analysis are em- 
phasized. Potential flow theory development with introduction to the effects of viscosity 
and compressibility. Two dimensional and three dimensional pheonomena are considered. 

ME 652 DYNAMICS OF COMPRESSIBLE FLOW 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 651 

Properties of compressible fluids, equation of motion of one-dimensional motion, channel 
flows, shock wave theory, methods of observation, and flows of transonic speeds. 

ME 653 SUPERSONIC AERODYNAMICS 5 (5-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 652 

Equations of motion in supersonic flow, Prandtl-Meyer turns, method characteristics, hodo- 

graph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory, and boundary layer shock 

interaction. 

ME 654 DYNAMICS OF VISCOUS FLUIDS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 651 

Development of the Navier-Stokes equations and the boundary layer theory. Laminar and 

turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment, flow separation, and transition. 

ME 660 AERO-MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 502, MA 514, 543 or equivalent 

Derivation of governing equations and set-up of representative problems in heat transfer, 
gas dynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics; review of techniques for solving these problems. 
Introduction of other techniques such as method of steepest descent, method of Weiner- 
Hopf. variational methods and others. Phase-space and function space concepts will be 
introduced also. Purpose of the course in the graduate program to strengthen the analytical 
techniques of the students in dealing with aero-mechanical engineering problems so that in 
their later studies more emphasis may be put on formulation of new problems and physical 
interpretation of new results. 

J. T. Yen 

ME 671, 672 ADVANCED AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ME 571, ME 572 

The design of heating and air conditioning systems; the preparation of specifications and 
performance tests on heating and air conditioning equipment. 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MIM 201, 202 STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS I, II 

3 (2-3) f s 
Prerequisite: CH 103 

I An introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and con- 
stitution of metallic and non-metallic materials of construction, and the relation of these 
principles to the control of properties. 

II Important applications of engineering materials and criteria for selection of materials. 

MIM 321 METALLURGY 3 (2-3) i 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

A general course in physical metallurgy including laboratory work. 

The constitution, structure, and properties of metals and alloys. 



278 Metallurgical Engineering 

mim 331, 332 physical metallurgy i, ii 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 103, MIM 201 
Required of juniors in MTE 

The fundamental principles of physical metallurgy with emphasis on correlation between 
structure, constitution, and properties of metals and alloys. A systematic development of 
the metallurgical aspects of atomic and crystalline structure, solid solution, diffusion, preci- 
pitation hardening, elastic and plastic behavior, and recrystallization. 

MIM 401, 402 METALLURGICAL OPERATIONS I, II 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 332 

A systematized treatment of the fundamental operations involved in the production and 
fabrication of metals and alloys. Part I deals primarily with procedures and operations em- 
ployed in chemical or extractive metallurgy. Part II covers the operations of physical and 
mechanical metallurgy. 

MIM 421, 422 METALLURGY I, II 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Required of seniors in ME and MEA 

The constitution, structure and properties of engineering ferrous and non-ferrous metals and 

alloys; influences of mechanical working and heat treatment; physical testing, corrosion and 

its prevention. Laboratory work included in second semester. 

MIM 423 METALLURGICAL LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: MIM 421 or MIM 422 

Laboratory work to accompany Metallurgy I, II 

MIM 431, 432 METALLOGRAPHY I, III 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 332 

An intensive study of the principles and techniques for examination and correlation of the 

structure, constitution, and properties of metals and alloys. 

MIM 445, 446 EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING I, II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or approval of instructor 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific project dealing with metallurgy, 
metallography, or general experimental work. A seminar period provided and a written re- 
port required. 

MIM 451, 452 METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in MTE 

Reports and discussion of special topics in metallurgical engineering and related subjects. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MIM 521, 522 ADVANCED PHYSICAL METTALLURGY I, II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or MIM 432 

Theories concerning behavior and control of engineering alloys, reaction rates in the solid 
state and alloy influences; current heat treating practices, surface treatments; behavior of 

ink metals at high and low temperatures; special purpose alloys; powder metallurgy; review 
of modern equipment and methods for the study of metals. 

MIM 523, 524 METALLURGICAL FACTORS IN DESIGN 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

A study of the metallurgical factors that must be considered in using metals in design. 

MIM 541, 542 PRINCIPLES OF CORROSION I, II 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

The fundamentals of metalic corrosion and passivity. The electrochemical nature of cor- 
rosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, methods of corrosion protec- 
tion. Laboratory work included. 

MIM 545, 546 ADVANCED METALLURGICAL EXPERIMENTS I, II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or approval of instructor 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental metallurgical project. 

A seminar period is provided and a written report is required. 

MIM 561 ADVANCED STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

materials of construction for nuclear reactors. Lecture and laboratory. 

MIM 562 MATERIALS PROBLEMS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: MIM 561 

A systematic treatment of the fundamental physico-chemical principles governing the con- 
stitution of both metallic and ceramic materials. Correlation of these principles with physical 
mechanical and chemical properties of materials. Particular emphasis is placed upon 
Engineering aspects of problems involved in the selection and application of reactor materials. 
Specific attention is given to elevated temperature behavior, fatigue, corrosion, irradiation 
damage, and the fabrication and processing of these materials. Lecture and laboratory. 



Military Science 279 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MIM 651, 652 THEORY AND STRUCTURE OF METALS 3 (3-0) f » 

Prerequisite: MIM 522 

An advanced interpretation of the development of theories of the metallic state with em- 
phasis on modern physical concepts. Topics include theory of crystallinity, bonding forces, 
stability of metallic structures, diffusion, and dislocation theory. 

MIM 695 METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Independent investigation of an appropriate problem in Metallurgical Engineering. A report 
on this investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



THE BASIC COURSE 

MS 101 MILITARY SCIENCE I 1 (1-1) f 

Classroom instruction is given in organization of the Army, and in individual weapons and 
marksmanship. On the drill field, emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de 
corps, and essential characteristics of leadership. 

MS 102 MILITARY SCIENCE I 1 (1-1) f 

Prerequisites: MS 101 or equivalent credit. 

Classroom instruction is given in the role of United States Army and National Security. On 
the drill field, emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de corps, essential 
characteristics of leadership. 

MS 201 MILITARY SCIENCE II 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisites: MS 101, MS 102 or equivalent credit. 

Classroom instruction in map and aerial photograph reading, and the role of the U. S. 
Army in national security. On the drill field emphasis is placed on development of team- 
work, esprit de corps, essential characteristics of leadership, and acceptance of respon- 
sibility. 

MS 202 MILITARY SCIENCE II 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisites: MS 101, MS 102 or equivalent credit. 
Classroom instruction in basic tactics employed by small units. 

On the drill field emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de corps, essen- 
tial characteristics of leadership, and acceptance of responsibiltiy. 



THE ADVANCED COURSE 

MS 301 MILITARY SCIENCE III 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisites: MS I and II or equivalent credit. 

Classroom instruction is given in the principles of military planning and conduct of 
offensive and defensive tactics. This study includes communications in support of military 
operations. Practical leadership instruction is provided on the drill field where emphasis 
is placed on acceptance of responsibility, exercise of command, and development of telf- 
confidence, initiative and dignity in appearance and demeanor. 

MS 302 MILITARY SCIENCE III 2 (2-1) s 

Prerequisite: MS 301. 

Classroom instruction is given in missions and functions of the combat arms and technical 
services; military leadership, emphasizing the factors controlling the soldier's behavior and 
the problems of command; methods in militory teaching with special reference to the 
leader's responsibility for soldier's learning. Practical leadership instruction is provided 
on the drill field where emphasis is placed on acceptance of responsibility, exercise of 
command and development of self-confidence. 

MS 401 MILITARY SCIENCE IV 1 (2-1) f 

Prerequisites: MS III, satisfactory completion of six weeks, summer camp training. 
Classroom instruction is given in military justice, troop movement, logistics, and operations. 
On the drill field, emphasis is placed on the exercise of command, planning and executing 
all phases of training (instruction in basic fundamentals, inspections, ceremonies, and 
competitions) and maximum development of teamwork, esprit de corps, and leadership 
characteristics. 



280 Modern Languages 

ms 402 military science iv 2 (2-1) s 

Prerequisites: MS III, satisfactory completion of six weeks' summer camp training. 
Classroom instruction is given in supply and evacuation, Army administration, role of the 
United States in world affairs, and service orientation. On the drill field, emphasis is 
placed on the exercise of command, planning and executing all phases of training (instruc- 
tion in basic fundamentals, inspections, ceremonies, and competitions) and maximum 
development of teamwork, esprit de corps, and leadership characteristics. 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

SEE CERAMIC ENGINEERING 
SEE GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 
SEE METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Courses numbered 200 and above need not be followed as a sequence in their respective 
gamut. Two years of high school language will normally be considered the equivalent of 
one year of college instruction in that language. All students registering for a language 
course will be examined on proficiency and scheduled for the course for which they are 
fitted. 

FRENCH 

ML 101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 3 (3-0) f s 

Structure, diction, pronunciation, and other matters of technique of the language, supple- 
mented by readings and translations. No previous training in the language necessary. 

ML 102 FRENCH GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisite: ML 101 or equivalent 

A survey of the basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate 

readings progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

ML 201 FRENCH PROSE: SELECTIONS FROM MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102 or equivalent 

Selected readings from literary French. Attention given to the attainment of skill in 

reading and comprehension. 

ML 202 FRENCH CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102 or equivalent 

Special emphasis given to translating from French. After a preliminary survey of the land 
and people of France, such topics as language, arts, science, literature, philosophy, etc., 
are given consideration. Parallel readings and reports. 

ML 301 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Lectures illustrated by selected readings in translation covering the development of the 
novel, the drama, the short story and the poetry of France from the 12th century to the 
present. Parallel readings and reports. No language prerequisites. 

ML 401, 402 INTRODUCTORY SCIENTIFIC FRENCH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 201, ML 202 or equivalent 

A study of scientific French of intermediate difficulty, supplemented with lectures on 
terminology and other linguistic techniques. The needs of students whose interest is that 
of the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language are constantly kept in view. 
Basic technique of translation explained and demonstrated by means of personal con- 
ferences. 

ML 501, 502 ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC FRENCH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Knowledge of basic French grammar 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines and technical 
journals. Designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the language is pri- 
marily that of reading ability. Choice of reading material adjusted to individual needs: 
may be taken by students of varying degrees of previous linguistic training. 



Modern Languages 281 

GERMAN 

ML 103 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 3 (3-0) f s 

Study of the structure and technique of the language, supplemented by easy reading and 
translations. No previous training in the language necessary. 

ML 104 GERMAN GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 103 or equivalent 

A course designed primarily for students who wish to attain proficiency in reading German. 
Attention given to basic grammar and vocabulary with practice in the translation and 
interpretation of German prose. 

ML 203 GERMAN PROSE: SELECTIONS FROM MODERN GERMAN LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f t 
Prerequisites: ML 103, ML 104 or equivalent 

Readings in German literature, a study of representative authors and their contribution 
to the development of the German language and culture. Parallel readings and reports. 

ML 204 GERMAN CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 103, ML 104 or equivalent 

Attention given to translation from German. Readings in the history and customs of Ger- 
many, supplemented by lectures on such topics as language, arts, science, philosophy, etc. 
Parallel readings and reports. 

ML 303 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

The study of various types of German Literature. A brief outline of German literary develop- 
ment. Parallel readings in translation. No previous training in the language necessary. 

ML 503 GERMAN GRAMMAR FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is open to Graduate Students and Senior Honor Students and is designed to present 
the grammar of scientific German as rapidly as possible in preparation for the reading 
course which follows. 

ML 504 SCIENTIFIC GERMAN 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 503 or equivalent 

Reading and translation of technical German, supplemented by discussions on terminology, 
word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic techniques. Subject material adjusted 
to individual needs; conferences. 



SPANISH 

ML 105 ELEMENTARY SPANISH 3 (3-0) f s 

Structure, diction, pronunciation and other matters of technique of the language, supple- 
mented by easy readings. No previous training in the language necessary. 

ML 106 SPANISH GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 105 or equivalent 

A survey of the basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate 
readings progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

ML 205 SPANISH CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 105, ML 106 or equivalent 

Emphasis is placed upon translating Spanish prose and developing vocobulary. The readings 
give the student a comprehensive picture of the culture, geogrophy, history, and economy 
of Spain. 

ML 206 HISPANO-AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 105, ML 106, or equivalent 

Emphasis is placed upon translating Spanish prose and developing vocabulary. The read- 
ings give the student a comprehensive picture of the culture, geography, history, and 
economy of the Spanish American countries. 

ML 305 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Lecture illustrated by selected reading in translation covering the development of the 
novel drama, short story and poetry of Spain from 1300 to the present. Parallel reading 
and reports by students. 

ML 307, 308 TECHNICAL SPANISH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 205 or equivalent 

A study of technical and industrial literature. Particular attention given to the special 
terminology characteristic of such literature with a view to the acquisition of a practical 
vocabulary. Individual conferences and reports. 



282 Modern Languages 

ML 405, 406 SCIENTIFIC SPANISH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 205, ML 206 or equivalent 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines and technical 
journals. Students given the opportunity of working a translation project in connection 
with their subject of major interest. Special attention given to the comprehension of the 
thought of the article under consideration and to its accurate rendition into English. 
Parallel readings, reports and conferences. 



ENGLISH (FOREIGN STUDENTS) 

ML 107 ELEMENTARY ENGLISH: PRONUNCIATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the pronunciation and comprehension of American 
English. Through oral reports students are encouraged to improve their diction and pro- 
nunciation. Comprehension is approached through dictation and lectures. Attention to 
grammar and spelling is given as individual problems arise. 

ML 108 ELEMENTARY ENGLISH: READING 3 (3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the rapid comprehension of written English without 
the necessity of the student's first translating the material into his own language. Exercises 
are given in paraphrasing the material read. Continued practice on pronunciation, spelling 
and grammar. Special attention is paid to idiomatic expressions and Americanisms. 

ML 109 ELEMENTARY ENGLISH: COMPOSITION 3 (3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the writing of English, special attention being given 
to compositions, grammatical exercises, sentence structure, spelling and diction. 



RUSSIAN 

ML 110 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN 3 (3-0) f s 

Basic structure of the language, supplemented by easy readings. 

ML 111 RUSSIAN GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f 9 

Prerequisite: ML 110 

A course for students who wish to attain proficiency in reading Russian. Attention given 
to basic grammar and the use of the written language. 

ML 211 RUSSIAN PROSE: SELECTIONS FROM RUSSIAN LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f a 

Prerequisite: ML 110, ML 111, or equivalent 

Selceted readings from Russian literature. Grammar review and emphasis on vocabulary 

building and improvement in reading and speaking ability. 

ML 212 RUSSIAN CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f • 

Prerequisites: ML 110, ML 111 

Reading in Russian covering the history, politics, customs, and culture of Russia. Emphasis 

given to accurate translation from Russian to English. Parallel readings and reports. 



ITALIAN 

ML 112 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN 3 (3-0) f s 

Structure, diction, pronunciation, and other matters of technique of the language, supple- 
mented by easy readings, individual reports and conferences. No previous training in the 
language required. 

ML 113 ITALIAN GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 112 or equivalent 

A survey of basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate read- 
ings, progressing to the reading of standard texts. 



GENERAL COURSES 

ML 321, 322 ROMANCE LITERATURE 2 (2-0)s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

A course cutting across language barriers to illustrate the most outstanding literary pro- 
ductions of France, Spain, Italy, and Portugal and showing the cultural and social pattern 
of these nationalities having a common language inheritance. Selected readings and reports. 



Philosophy and Religion 283 

ml 323, 324 germanic literature 2 (2-0) t 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

A study of the literary productions in each of the various types of Germanic literature, 
and lectures on their, cultural background. Designed primarily to meet the needs of 
students who wish to supplement their knowledge of their own literature with that of the 
literature of other civilizations. Attention is given to the literary monuments of Germany, 
Holland, Denmark, Iceland, and the Scandinavian countries. No foreign language pre- 
requisites. 



NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

NE 530 (PY 530) ELEMENTARY NUCLEAR REACTOR THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

NE 531 (PY 531) NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

NE 619 (PY 619) HETEROGENEOUS REACTOR DESIGN 3 (3-0) ff 

NE 620 (PY 620) NUCLEAR RADIATION ATTENUATION 3 (3-0) s 

NE 630 (PY 630) HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR DESIGN 3 (3-0) s 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PHI 201 LOGIC 3 (3-0) ff ■ 

Language as symbol system, the formal structure of reasoning, and characteristics of 
empirical knowledge; emphasis on the establishment of reflective habits. 

PHI 205 PROBLEMS AND TYPES OF PHILOSOPHY 3 (3-0) ff • 

The great philosophers of the western world, the socio-cultural heritage in which they 
worked, their major concerns and conclusions; the relation of philosophy to vital questions 
of human life. 

REL 301 RELIGIOUS GROUPS AND TRENDS IN THE UNITED STATES 2 (2-0) f s 

Background and characteristic beliefs of the major religious groups in the United States; 
survey of the dominant trends and movements in contemporary American religion. 

REL 302 THE BIBLE AND ITS BACKGROUND 3 (3-0) f t 

Background of the Bible: origin, growth, and development of central concepts, leading 
personalities, and the process by which it has come to us as viewed in the light of modern 
scholarship. 

REL 303 CHRISTIAN ETHICS 2 (2-0) f ■ 

An analysis of the major areas of modern life in the light of the ethical teachings of 
Christianity, with an examination of the religious faith upon which these teachings rest. 

PHI 305 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3 (3-0) ff • 

Psychological and historical roots of religious belief; science, philosophy, and religion; the 
rational foundations of theism; the concept of God in Western thought. 

PHI 306 PHILOSOPHY OF ART 3 (3-0) f i 

Study of historical and contemporary theories of art; development of coherent set of 
concepts for analysis and discussion of esthetic experience, critical judgments, works of 
art and their relations to other aspects of culture. 

PHI 307 ETHICS 3 (3-0) f I 

Study of major ethical theories; attempts systematic analysis of the nature of value judg- 
ments, the concepts of moral obligation, right and good. 

PHI 309 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIVING 3 (3-0) f s 

Secular and religious concepts of marriage; physical, socio-phychological, and ethical 
aspects of premarital and marital relationships; parenthood; systematic analysis of value 
judgments relative to marriage and family living; formulation of philosophy of marriage. 

PHI 311 PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS 2 (2-0) ff • 

Principles of inter-personal relationships; the enhancement of democratic values and the 
attainment of growth on the part of parent and child through the exercise of freedom, 
responsibility, and creative activity; evaluation of prevalent theories of husband-wife, and 
parent-child relationships. 



284 Physical Education 

phi 395 philosophical analysis 3 (3-0) f $ 

Semantical, logical, and experiential methods of investigation; intensive application of 
critical inquiry to a few fundamental problems including the nature of knowledge and its 
validation, and value judgement; major objective to afford the student personal participa- 
tion in the acquaintance with philosophical analysis as intellectual tool with wide appli- 
cability. 

PHI 401 SYMBOLIC LOGIC 3 (3-0) f s 

Modern methods in logic involving formalized expression that avoids the inherent difficul- 
ties and ambiguities of ordinary language and makes possible greater exactness and effec- 
tiveness in handling complex material. 

REL 403 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD 3 (3-0) f s 

Background, general characteristics, and basic teachings of the major living religions of 
the world; consideration of contemporary secular movements that are in a sense religions. 

PHI 405 FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f s 

Nature and validity of knowledge, basic concepts of modern science, scientific method, 
and the implications of the philosophy of modern science for ethics, social philosophy, and 
the nature of reality. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

REL 502 PROBLEMS OF RELIGION 3 (3-0) f j 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion or related fields. 

Major trends in contemporary theology; significance of the resurgent interest in religion 
and the growth of the church in recent times; problem of communication between 
theology and science; the ecumenical movement. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The college requires all freshmen and sophomores to take physical education unless they 
are excused by the Health Service physician for physical reasons. As explained in the 
paragraph below, veterans are given special considerations. Normally, credit in four physical 
education courses is required for graduation. All physical education students must pass a 
swimming test. Activities in the physical education program are divided into two program 
areas: prescribed sports and controlled elective sports. Insofar as facilities and staff permit, 
every effort is made to direct students into activities which will meet their individual needs. 
The basis for determining individual needs are as follows: 

A MEDICAL EXAMINATION. In case a student has some unusual physical impairment, the 
college physician will either excuse him from physical education or recommend a special 
type of activity suitable to the particular need. 

A SWIMMING TEST. All freshmen and transfer students who fail to pass the swimming 
test are immediately assigned to beginning swimming. Students who pass the test are 
classified primarily on the basis of their scores in the athletic ability test. 

AN ATHLETIC ABILITY TEST. Students who score below the 15th percentile are enrolled 
in fundamental sports for two semesters, or until their improvement indicates that they are 
ready for Basic Sports. 

STUDENTS WHO SCORE BETWEEN the 15th and 75th percentiles are placed in basic sports 
for two semesters, or until their improvement indicates that they are ready for the con- 
trolled elective sports area. 

STUDENTS WHO SCORE ABOVE the 75th percentile are immediately directed to the con- 
trolled elective sports area. 

Normally, all second year students participate in the controlled elective sports area. This 
part of the program is controlled to the extent that a student may not receive credit in 
more than two team sports. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR VETERANS 

1 — All servicemen who have taken as much as six-months military service will receive one 
year of credit, PE 101, PE 102. 

2 — All servicemen will be required to take one year of Physical Education. (PE 201, PE 202.) 

3 — A former student or transfer student with one earned semester credit in physical educa- 
tion plus military service must earn one more semester credit. (PE 202.) 



Physical Education 285 

A — A student who has earned one year (2 semester credits) here or elsewhere, plus his 
credit of one year for military service will have completed his requirements. 

5 — Servicemen who have received credit for two full years of physical education may 
elect to take additional courses which would be in the 300 series. PE 301, PE 302, PE 303, 
PE 304. 

6 — All students who have received one year of credit in physical education, from military 
service or as a transfer student, will be exempt from the hygiene requirement. 

7 — All students who take even one semester of physical education as a required course at 
North Carolina State College must pass the swimming requirement. 

Hygiene: All freshmen must complete satisfactorily a half semester of hygiene or show 
adequate proficiency as measured by a Health Knowledge Test given during Orientation 
Week. Students who are exempted from hygiene must substitute a sports activity. 



COURSES 

PE 101, 102 1 (0-2) ff ■ 

PE 201, 202 1 (0-2) f t 

PE 301, 302, 303, 304 Junior and Senior electives 1 (0-2) f a 

Note: Juniors and seniors may elect any activity from the controlled elective sports 
area in which they have not previously received credit. Transfer students and veterans 
who cannot swim will be urged to elect beginning swimming. 

ACTIVITIES IN PRESCRIBED SPORTS AREA 
COURSES 

BEGINNING SWIMMING: Offered in the fall semester. A course designed for meeting the 
college requirement and for preparing the student for intermediate swimming. 

FUNDAMENTAL SPORTS: Offered in the fall and spring. A course designed for the low 
skilled student where a particular type of activity can be given to meet his special needs. 

BASIC SPORTS: Offered in the fall and spring semesters. A course designed to acquaint 
the medium skilled student with appropriate activities in both team and individual self- 
testing items. 

HYGIENE: Offered in the second half of the fall semester, and in the first half of the 
spring semester. A course designed to guide the student to a more healthful way of life. 



ACTIVITIES IN ELECTIVE SPORTS AREA 
COURSES: TEAM SPORTS 

BASKETBALL: Offered in the second half of the fall semester and in the first half of 
the spring semester. A course designed to cover the fundamentals of shooting, offensive 
and defensive strategy, history and rules. 

FOOTBALL (touch): Offered in the first half of the fall semester. A course designed to 
cover the fundamentals of offensive and defensive play. 

SOCCER: Offered in the first half of the fall semester. A course designed to acquaint 
the student with the fundamental skills and to provide out-of-door activity in a team 
sport. 

SOFTBALL: Offered in the second half of the spring semester. A course designed to 
include the fundamentals, history, and rules of the game. 

SPEEDBALL: Offered in the fall and spring semesters. A course designed to teach the 
fundamental skills, history, and rules of the game. 



286 Physical Education 

VOLLEYBALL: Offered in the first half of the fall semester, and in the entire spring 
semester. A course designed to include the fundamentals, history, and rules of the game. 



COURSES: INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 

ANGLING: Offered in the first half of the fall semester, and the second half of the 
spring semester. A course designed to teach the fundamentals of spin, fly and bait 
casting, and an understanding of the game of skish. 

BADMINTON: Offered in the second half of the spring semester. A course designed to 
give the beginner a thorough knowledge of the basic strokes and a general knowledge 
of the history, rules and strategy of the game. 

BOWLING (TEN PINS): Offered in the first and second half of the fall semester, and 
in the first half of the spring semester. Fundamentals of ball selection, grip, stance, and 
delivery are taught, together with rules, history, scoring and general theory of spare 
coverage. Students take turns setting pins. (Fee $2.50). 

BOXING: Offered in the second half of the fall semester. A course designed to acquaint 
the student with the fundamentals, history and rules, with special emphasis on defensive 
techniques. 

CROSS COUNTRY: Offered both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to develop 
knowledge, skill, and interest in cross-country. 

GOLF: Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the second half of the 
spring semester. A course designed for the beginner; grip, stance, swing, and use of the 
various clubs, together with the history and etiquette of play. 

GYMNASTICS: Offered in the second half of the fall semester and first half of the 
spring semester. A course designed to include the fundamentals of gymnastics on the 
parallel bars, side horse, trampoline, and mats. 

HANDBALL: Offered in both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to include 
the fundamentals, together with history and rules of handball. 

RIFLERY: Offered in the last half of the fall semester and the first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to teach safety and skill with firearms during the three basic 
positions of shooting. 

ROLLER SKATING: Offered during the second half of the fall semester and the first 
half of the spring semester. A course designed to teach the fundamentals of roller 
skating. Emphasis will be on body balance and control. 

SQUASH: Offered in both fall and spring semesters. A course designed to include the 
fundamentals, together with history and rules of squash. 

SWIMMING (INTERMEDIATE): Offered in both fall and spring semesters. A course de- 
signed to give the student competence in four basic strokes and two dives, preparatory 
to the Life Saving Program. 

SWIMMING (SENIOR RED CROSS LIFE SAVING): Offered in the fall and spring semesters. 
Prerequisite: Intermediate Swimming or the equivalent. A course designed to qualify 
students for a Senior Red Cross Life Saving certificate and the possibility of a Water 
Safety Instructor's rating. 

SWIMMING (RED CROSS INSTRUCTORS): Offered in the fall and spring semesters. Pre- 
requisite: A certificate for Senior Red Cross Life Saving. A course designed to qualify 
students for a Water Safety Instructor's rating. 

TENNIS (BEGINNING): Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the second 
half of the spring semester. A course designed to give the beginner a thorough knowl- 
edge of the history, rules and basic strategy of the game. 

TENNIS (ADVANCED): Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the second 
half of the spring semester. Prerequisite: Beginning Tennis or its equivalent. Basic 
strokes are reviewed and the more difficult strokes taught. Emphasis is placed upon 
strategy during play and upon a more factual knowledge of the game and court etiquete. 

TRACK AND FIELD: Offered during the first half of the fall semester and second half 
of the spring semester. A course designed to develop knowledge, skill and interest in 
track and field events. 

WRESTLING: Offered in the first half of the fall semester and the first half of the 
spring semester. A course designed to give the fundamentals, history and rules of 
wrestling. 



Physics 287 

VARSITY SPORTS 

Note: students may elect, with the approval of the coach, the following varsity sports: 
baseball, basketball, cross-country track, football, golf, soccer, swimming, track, and 
wrestling. 

PHYSICS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 201, 202 GENERAL PHYSICS S (3-4) f s; f ■ 

Corequisite: MA 201 

Required of sophomores in Sciences, Mathematics, and Engineering. A study of classical 
and modern physics in which the analytical approach is employed. Emphasis is placed 
on the understanding of fundamental facts and principles, and on the solution of prob- 
lems. The MKS system of units is used, and calculus is applied as needed. Demonstration 
lectures, recitations, problem drill and laboratory work are coordinated to give a working 
knowledge of basic principles. PY 201, mechanics, sound, and heat; PY 202, electricity, 
light, and modern physics. 

PY 211, 212 GENERAL PHYSICS 4 (3-3) f s; s 

Prerequisite: MA 1 1 1 

A survey of general physics designed to provide a practical understanding of the funda- 
mentals on which technology is based. Recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory work. 
PY 211, mechanics and heat; PY 212, sound, light, and electricity. 

PY 221 COLLEGE PHYSICS 5 (5-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 1 1 1 

Required in certain curricula of the School of Agriculture. An introduction to the origins 
of physical science, the fundamental principles of physics, and the many applications to 
modern technology. The important concepts in the classical areas of mechanics, heat, 
sound, electricity and magnetism, and light are presented, along with discussion of modern 
atomic physics. Lectures and demonstrations with class participation. 

PY 223 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS 3 (3-0) % 

Prerequisite: PY 212 or PY 202 

An introduction to descriptive and physical astronomy, with attention to the solar system, 
constellations, and star groups. The physical aspects of stars, such as brightness, temper- 
atures, energy and composition, are reviewed, along with the development of theories of 
galaxies and the universe. The nature of fusion sources of energies in stars is discussed. 
Observations are made with the 5-inch refracting telescope as part of the course. 

PY 311 LIGHT AND COLOR IN INDUSTRY 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Survey of the fundamental principles of light and radiation; photometry, illumination and 
distribution of light; lighting calculations; fluorescent lighting; the physiological and 
psychological aspects of light and color; color theories, standardization of color; color 
contrast, and color harmony. Special emphasis placed on development of color harmony. 

PY 322 DESCRIPTIVE METEOROLOGY 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Explanation of the weather and associated phenomena at an introductory level. Structure 
of the atmosphere; instrumentation; heat balance and primary circulation of the atmos- 
phere; air masses, fronts, and waves, tertiary circulations; atmosphere of the lowest 10 
meters. 

PY 323 APPLIED METEOROLOGY 2 (2-0) ■ 

Prerequisite: PY 322 

Technique of application of meteorological data to problems in Engineering, Agriculture, 
Forestry, etc., where weather is a factor, using principle of expectations as the basis for 
analysis. Examples from several fields as illustrations of various analysis techniques. 

PY 327 LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN PHOTOGRAPHY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

A treatment of the general principles of photography with special applications in the fields 
of spectrography, micrography, Roentgenology, and nuclear physics. 

PY 401 MECHANICS 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in theoretical mechanics. Statics and dynamics of particles and 

rigid bodies. Lectures, problems, recitations with one laboratory per week. 



288 Physics 

PY 402 HEAT AND SOUND 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in the principles of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, heat transfer 
and vibration. Lectures, problems, recitations, with one laboratory per week. 

PY 403 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in the fundamentals of static and dynamic electricity and electro- 
magnetic theory. Lectures, problems, recitation with one laboratory per week. 

PY 404 OPTICS 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 202; Corequisite: MA 301 

An intermediate course in physical and geometric optics. Lectures, problems, recitations, 
with one laboratory per week. 

PY 407 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 202; MA 202 

A survey of the important developments in atomic and nuclear physics of this century. 
Among topics covered are: atomic and molecular structure, determination of properties of 
ions and fundamental particles, the origin of spectra, cosmic rays, ion accelerators and 
nuclear reactions. 

PY 410 NUCLEAR PHYSICS I 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 407 

An introduction to the properties of the nucleus, the interaction of radiation with matter. 
A quantitative description is given of natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
fission, fusion, and the structure of simple nuclei. Lectures and laboratory. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 501 WAVE MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 407, MA 301 

An introduction to the foundations of quantum and wave mechanics, with solutions of the 
problem of the free particle, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotating molecule, and the hydrogen 
atom. Approximation methods are developed for more complex atomic systems. 

PY 503 INTRODUCTION TO THEORETICAL PHYSICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 401 or PY 403, MA 541 

An introductory course which offers preparation necessary for advanced graduate study. 
This course presented from the viewpoint of vector and tensor calculus, includes: particle 
dynamics, La grange's equations of motion, Hamilton's principle, mechanics of rigid bodies, 
topics in electromagnetic theory and relativity, with an elementary treatment of the motion 
of charged particles. 

PY 507 ADVANCED ATOMIC PHYSICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 401, PY 403, PY 407, MA 401 

Statistical theory of matter; derivations of Maxwell, Fermi, and Bose distributions; dis- 
tributions in potential fields; distinction between metals, insulators, semi-metals, and semi- 
conductors; thermionic, field, photo, and secondary emissions from metals; effects of 
absorbed films on surfaces; electronic and ionic collisions in un-ionized and in ionized 
gasses; ionization and recombination in gases and at surfaces; optical excitation, absorption, 
and spontaneous and induced emission; bremsstrahlung; Cerenkov radiation; mass spectrome- 
try; space change in vacuum and dimensional similitude; space charge in low density 
ionized gases, and some examples; magnetic self-focusing in streams; relativistic streams. 

PY 510 NUCLEAR PHYSICS II 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The description and analysis of nuclear energy levels, meson theory, nuclear resonance, 
atomic and molecular magnetism and cosmic radiation. Principles and experiments in 
neutron physics are discussed. Emphasis is placed on experience in independent research 
in the laboratory work. 

PY 518 RADIATION HAZARD AND PROTECTION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The hazards from external exposure to ionizing radiation are evaluated, and the factors 
influencing dosage due to internal exposure are investigated. Methods of providing pro- 
tection in research or large-scale use of radioactive elements are analyzed. 

PY 520 PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS IN RADIOACTIVITY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The principles of experimental measurements on radioactive materials are presented and 
demonstrated through laboratory work. Emphasis is placed on preparation of samples for 
precise quantitative study, detection of radiations, and analytical interpretation of experi- 
mental data. 



Physics 289 

py 526 ionization phenomena and electron optics 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 404, PY 410 

Investigation of plasma phenomena, including ion production, recombination, radiation, 
instabilities, and confinement by electromagnetic fields. A review of the problems, progress, 
and status of thermonuclear research. 

PY 530 INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 410; MA 511 or MA 532 

The principles of neutron motion in matter, with emphasis on the analysis of the nuclear 
chain reactor. Slowing of neutrons, diffusion, space distributions of flux, conditions for 
criticality, group theories, and the time dependent behavior of fissionable assemblies. 

PY 531 NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: PY 530, PY 518 except by permission. 

Observation and measurements of static and dynamic nuclear reactor behavior, the effec- 
tiveness of control and temperature, and correlation with theory. Experiments on the 
motion and detection of neutrons and gamma rays, with emphasis on the research uses 
of nuclear reactor radiations. 

PY 541 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTS IN PHYSICS 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202 

Covers the technique and theory of selected experiments in mechanics, heat, sound, light, 
or electricity. The treatment and interpretation of data are stressed. 

PY 544 VIBRATION AND WAVE MOTION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 301 

The dynamics of vibratory and oscillatory motion. Analogies in mechanical, electrical and 
acoustical virbrating systems. Analysis of wave motion and propagation in different media. 

PY 545 APPLIED ACOUSTICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 544 

The dynamical theory of sound. Sources of sound, measurement of sound intensity, meas- 
urement of frequency, acoustical impedance and transmission of sound, transducers, filters 
and resonators, acoustics of speech and hearing, reception and reproduction of sound, 
acoustics of buildings. 

PY 551 INTRODUCTION TO X-RAYS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202 

The origin, production and absorption of x-rays are studied, the single-crystal and powder 
diffraction methods are presented and applied in the laboratory to the study of crystal 
structure, metallurgical defects and fiber and particle size. 

PY 522 INTRODUCTION TO THE STRUCTURE OF SOLIDS, CRYSTALLOGRAPHY 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202, PY 551 recommended 

Basic considerations of amorphous and crystalline solids, metals, conductors and semi- 
conductors. Introduction to optical crystallography. 

PY 601, 602 ADVANCED GENERAL PHYSICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 503, Corequisite: MA 661 

Mathematical and theoretical approach to relationships between the various branches of 
physics, with applications to mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal, and vibratory prob- 
lems. The restricted theory of relativity, electrodynamics, the theory of electrons, classical 
field theory, and the general theory of relativity. 

PY 610 ADVANCED NUCLEAR PHYSICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 410, PY 611 except by permission 

Current hypotheses of nuclear structure and reactions including deuteron binding, neutron- 
proton scattering, the compound nucleus, stripping reactions, shell structure, beta decay, 
neutron resonances and mesons. The use of neutrons in present-day nuclear research is 
emphasized. 

PY 611 QUANTUM MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 501, MA 512 

Theory of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic and molecular structure, scatter- 
ing phenomena, and a semi-classical treatment of the interaction of radiation with matter. 

PY 612 ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 601, PY 611 

Dirac's relativistic electron theory, elementary scalar and vector meson field theory. 
Introduction to quantum electrodynamics and the general theory of quantized fields. 

PY 619 REACTOR THEORY AND ANALYSIS I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

The theory of neutron slowing, resonance capture, Doppler effect, and thermal flux dis- 
tributions in heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Analysis of reactor control by temperature, 
effects of localized and distributed absorbers, fission products, fuel consumption and pro- 
duction. One-velocity neutron transport theory. 



290 Plant Pathology 

py 620 nuclear radiation attenuation 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: PY 503, MA 532 

Physical theory of neutron and gamma-ray behavior in matter. Calculations of source 
terms, attenuation factors, heating rates, geometrical transformations and radioactive decay 
effects required in the design of nuclear radiation shields. Transport theory of gamma-ray 
and neutron transmission through matter. Analysis of experimental techniques for obtain- 
ing shielding data. 

PY 621 KINETIC THEORY OF GASES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 503, MA 511 

The theory fo molecular motion, including the velocity and density distribution functions, 
the phenomena of viscosity, heat conduction and diffusion; equations of state; fluctuations. 

PY 622 STATISTICAL MECHANICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 501, MA 511, PY 621 except by permission. 

A treatment of statistical mechanics from both the classical and quantum point of view. 

Development of thermodynamic theories and application to atomic systems. 

PY 626 PLASMA PHYSICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 503, PY 507, PY 526 

Particle motion in electric and magnetic fields; guiding center; drift motions; effect of 
collisions upon charged particles moving through ionized gases; electrical conductivities in 
ionized gases in electric and magnetic fields; run-away electrons; diffusion; relaxation; 
thermal conductivity; electric and magnetic susceptibilities; Van Leeuwen's theorem; mag- 
netic pressure; waves in plasmas; astrophysical approximations and concepts; confinement 
of thermonuclear plasmas; propulsion of plasmas; instabilities in plasmas; streaming in- 
stabilities; plasma thermocouple, shock formation and properties. 

PY 630 REACTORS THEORY AND ANALYSIS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

The theory of neutron multiplication in uniform media, with several dimensions, regions 
and neutron energy groups. Reactor control by absorbers, time dependent reactor be- 
havior, matrix treatment of perturbation theory, neutron thermalization by interaction with 
moving nuclei, energy dependent neutron transport theory and multigroup machine methods. 

PY 631, 632 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SPECTRA 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: PY 501 Corequisites: PY 611, MA 532 

Atomic models and coupling schemes. Multiplet series, Zeeman, Paschen-Back, and Stark 
effects. Hyperfine structure and complex spectra. Spectra of polyatomic molecules. Infrared 
and Raman Spectra. Applications adapted to the interests of the students in the course. 

PY 661, 662 THE SOLID STATE 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisite: PY 501 or PY 611 

The electron theory of conduction, electrical and thermal conduction in solids, and surface 
phenomena, with applications to physical behavior and usage of solids. 

PY 670 SEMINAR 1 (0-3) f s 

Literature surveys, written and oral presentation of papers on special topics: (a) general 
physics and nuclear science, (b) nuclear physics, (c) ionic phenomena of space physics, 
(d) developments in plasma physics, (e) non-inertial space mechanics, and (f) developments 
in field theory. 

PY 690 RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake research in some selected field of 
Physics. 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 315 PLANT DISEASES 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

The nature and symptoms of disease in plants and the characteristics of important plant 
pathogenic nematodes, viruses bacteria, and fungi are studied. An understanding of the 
important concepts and methods of disease control is developed, based on a knowledge of 
major types of plant diseases. 

Mr. Kelman 

PP 318 DISEASES OF FOREST TREES 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: BO 103 

The nature and symptoms of major types of tree diseases and the important characteristics 
of their casual agents are studied. Emphasis is placed on the influence of environmental 
factors on disease development as well as the basic principles and methods of control. 

Mr. Kelman 



Plant Pathology 291 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 500 ADVANCED PLANT PATHOLOGY 2 (2-0) t 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or equivalent 

An advanced study of the economic importance, symptoms, disease cycles, epiphytology, 
and control of major groups of plant diseases. Students who register for this course are 
also required to register for either PP 501 or PP 502, or they may register for both. 

Mr. Winstead 

PP 501 ADVANCED PLANT PATHOLOGY LABORATORY-FIELD CROPS DISEASES 

1 (0-3) i 
Prerequisite: PP 315 or equivalent 

Laboratory course for students whose mojor interest is diseases of field crops to accompany 
lecture course in advanced plant pathology (PP 500). Diseases will be selected for study 
which are important on field crops. Either this course or PP 502 must be taken concur- 
rently with PP 500. 

Mr. Kline 

PP 502 ADVANCED PLANT PATHOLOGY LABORATORY-HORTICULTURE 

CROPS DISEASES 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or equivalent 

Laboratory course for students whose major interest is diseases of horticulture crops to 
accompany lecture course in advanced plant pathology (PP 500). Diseases will be selected 
for study which are important on fruit, ornamental and vegetable crops. Either this course 
or PP 501 must be taken concurrently with PP 500. 

Mr. Winstead 

PP 503 DIAGNOSIS OF PLANT DISEASES Summer session 3 (1-4) 

Prerequisites: One advanced course in Plant Pathology, permission of instructor 
A study of techniques used in plant disease diagnosis with emphasis on diagnostic value 
of signs and symptoms for certain types of diseases. Consideration will be given to major 
sources of descriptive information on plant pathogens and the use of keys for the identi- 
fication of fungi. 

(Offered in 1960 and alternate years) 

Mr. Hebert 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PP 601 PHYTOPATHOLOGY I 4 (1-6) f 

Prerequisite: PP 315, permission of the instructor 

A study of the principles of phytopathological research. The course is designed to apply 
the classical scientific method to disease investigation. Exercises will include appraising 
disease problems, reviewing literature, laboratory and greenhouse experiments and the 
evaluation and presentation of data. 

Mr. Apple 

PP 602 PHYTOPATHOLOGY II 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisite: PP 315, permission of the instructor 

The basic concepts of the etiology, pathology, epiphytology, and control of plant diseases. 
(Offered in 1959-60 and alternate years) 

Mr. Nusbaum 

PP 604 PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODES 2 (1-3) f 

Prerequisite: PP 315 

A study of morphology, anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy of plant parasitic nematodes. 
Methods of isolating nematodes from soil and plant parts and other laboratory techniques 
used in the study and identification of nematodes will be considered. 

Mrs. Triantaphyllou 

PP 605 PLANT VIROLOGY 3 (1-6) * 

Prerequisites: PP 315, GN 411, and a course in organic chemistry 

A study of plant viruses including effects on host plants, transmission, classification, methods 
of purification, determination of properties, chemical nature, structure, and multiplication. 
(Offered in 1960-61 and alternate years) 

Mr. Hebert 

PP 607 (GN 607) GENETICS OF FUNGI 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or equivalent, permission of instructor 

Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on principles and theories 

that have evolved in recent developments. 

(Offered in 1960-61 and alternate years) 

Mr. Nelson 



292 Poultry 

pp 608 history of phytopathology 1 (1-0) 

Prerequisite: PP 315, permission of instructor 

Development of the science of phytopathology from its early beginning to the early part 

of the 20th century. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and alternate years) 

Mr. Ellis 

PP 611 NEMATODE DISEASES OF PLANTS 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: PP 504 

A study of plant diseases caused by nematodes. Special consideration will be given to 
host-parasite relationships, host ranges, and life cycles of the more important economic 
species. Principles and methods of control will be considered. 

Mr. Sasser 

PP 615 RESEARCH IN PLANT PATHOLOGY Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Original research in connection with a thesis problem in plant pathology. 

Graduate Staff 

PP 625 SEMINAR IN PLANT PATHOLOGY 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Consent of Seminar Chairman 

Discussion of phytopathological topics related and assigned by seminar chairman. 

Graduate Staff 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

SEE HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POULTRY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 201 POULTRY PRODUCTION 4 (3-3) f s 

Principles of broiler, market eggs, hatching egg and turkey productions. Classes, breeds 
and varieties identification of chickens and turkeys. Breeding, incubation, raising, housing, 
feeding, disease and parasite control, marketing of chickens, eggs and turkeys. 

Messrs. Brown, Martin 

PO 301 POULTRY QUALITY EVALUATIONS 2 (1-3) f 

Prerequisite: PO 201 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 

Evaluation of poultry for production and standard qualities; determining market, poultry 

and eggs. 

Mr. Brown 

PO 351 POULTRY GRADING 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: PO 301 

Laboratory experience in determining federal grades of poultry and eggs. 

Mr. Brown 

PO 401 POULTRY DISEASES 4 (3-3) s 

The major infectious, non-infectious and parasitic diseases of poultry are studied with respect 
to economic importance, etiology, susceptibility, dissemination, symptoms and lesions. Em- 
phasis is placed upon practices necessary for the prevention, control and treatment of each 
disease. 

Mr. Craig 

PO 402 COMMERCIAL POULTRY ENTERPRISES 4 (3-2) s 

Prerequisites: Required of majors in Poultry Science 
Elective for others with permission of instructor 

Principles of incubation of chicken and turkey eggs; hatchery management; organization 
and development of plans for the operation and maintenance of a commercial poultry 
farm for meat and egg production; study of the types of buildings, equipment and methods 
of management currently employed by successful poultrymen in North Carolina. Problem. 

Mr. Brown 



Poultry 293 

PO 403 POULTRY SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Current topics and problems relating to Poultry Science and to the poultry industry are 
assigned tor oral report and discussion. Two semesters. 

Staff 

PO 404 POULTRY PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, CH 101 

Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 

Selection, processing, grading, and packaging poultry meat and eggs. Factors involved in 

preservation of poultry meat and eggs. 

Mr. Fromm 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 520 POULTRY BREEDING 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

Application of genetic principles to poultry breeding, considering physical traits and physio- 
logical characteristics — feather patterns, egg production, hatchability, growth, body con- 
formation and utility. 

Mr. Martin 

PO 521 POULTRY NUTRITION 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: CH 203, CH 451 

Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 

A study of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals and vitamins required for growth, egg 

production and reproduction in the chicken and turkey. Symptoms and lesions induced by 

nutritional deficiencies. Compounding different types of poultry mashes and methods of 

feeding these mashes. The production of certain vitamin and mineral dificiencies in chicks 

for observation and examination. 

Mr. Kelly 

PO 522 ENDOCRINOLOGY OF THE FOWL 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 or equivalent 

The endocrine system is studied with respect to its physiological importance in such 

intricate processes as metabolism, growth and reproduction. Emphasis is placed upon this 

system for the fowl, but mammalian examples are also used to illustrate basic concepts of 

the science. The interests of the students will be considered in the selection of illustrative 

material. 

Mr. Garren 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

Graduate courses may not be offered if registration for the course is too low or if the 
faculty or facilities become unavailable. 

PO 601 ADVANCED POULTRY BREEDING 3 (3-0) arrange 

Prerequisites: ST 511, ST 512; PO 520 

Study of lethal, skeletal, and feather variations. Linkage and chromosome mapping of 
the fowl. Theory and contemporary ideas concerning breeding for meat and egg production 
in the fowl. 

Mr. Blow 

PO 602 ADVANCED POULTRY NUTRITION 3 (0-6) arrange 

Prerequisites: PO 521, CH 511 or equivalent 

Students taking this course will conduct a research problem in poultry nutrition. This prob- 
lem will involve the designing and carrying out of microbiological and chick experiments. 
The students will obtain practice in correlating results obtained in microbiological and chick 
assays. 

Mr. Hill 

PO 611 POULTRY RESEARCH 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Appraisal of present research, critical study of some particular problem involving original 
investigation. Problems in poultry breeding, nutrition, disease, endocrinology, hematology 
or microbiology. Credits: A maximum of six is allowed toward a Master's degree. 

Graduate Staff 

PO 613 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN POULTRY SCIENCE 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Specific problems of study are assigned in various phases of poultry science. 

Graduate Staff 



294 Psychology 

PRODUCT DESIGN 

PD 201, 202 PRODUCT DESIGN AND ORIENTATION 4 (3-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 102 

Required of second year students in Product Design 

Elementary problems in form and function. Transitional implications of handcrafted and 

mass-produced objects, in various materials. Demonstrations by specialists in graphics, 

photography, rendering, modeling, typography, and technical illustration. Visits to design 

departments of local industries. 

Mr. Baron 

PD 301, 302 PRODUCT DESIGN 6 (3-12) t s 

Prerequisites: PD 202, PY 212 

Required of third year students in Product Design 

Manufacturing and structural considerations in the design of a wide range of products. 

Mr. Baer 

PD 331, 332 MATERIALS AND PROCESSES 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of third year students in Product Design 

Study of the basic materials of industry, from raw materials and their properties to fabrica- 
tion techniques, design criteria and potential. 

PD 401, 402 ADVANCED PRODUCT DESIGN 6 (3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: PD 302, PD 332 

Continuation of Product Design into more complex systems. Emphasis is placed on functional 
innovation and integration of form and structure. Thorough analysis of fabrication by 
models and sketches. 

Mr. Macomber 

PD 422 OFFICE AND INDUSTRIAL PRACTICE 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PD 302 

Required for graduation in Product Design 

Study of the ethics, organization, and procedures of professional product design practice; 

patent law. 

PD 441, 442 DESIGN ANALYSIS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Required of fourth year students in Product Design 

Seminar on imaginative problem solving. Individual and group operational techniques in 

the spectrum of creative thought. 

PD 501 ADVANCED PRODUCT DESIGN 8 (3-12) f 

Prerequisite: PD 402 

Required of fifth year students in Product Design 

Continuation of emphasis on new product design and development, with reference to cur- 
rent developments in automatic fabrication and assembly. 

PD 502 PRODUCT DESIGN THESIS 9 (3-18) s 

Prerequisites: PD 501, PD 442, IE series 

A one semester project chosen by the student in his area of major interest, with faculty 
guidance. Independent research and developmnt of functional contribution, including com- 
plete programming of manufacture and distribution systems appropriate to the design. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 200 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the general characteristics and development of human behavior, emphasizing 
the problems of motivation, emotion, learning and thinking. 

Staff 

PSY 201 ELEMENTARY EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Introduction to experimental psychology. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman 

PSY 302 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY AND ADJUSTMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

A study of the factors involved in the development of the normal personality, emphasizing 

the principal factors controlling human behavior and their relationship to adjustment 

mechanisms. 

Mr. Corter 



Psychology 295 

psy 304 educational psychology 3 (3-0) f s 

PSY 200 recommended as an introductory course 

Applications of psychology to education; problems of learning, motivation, individual dif- 
ferences; the measurement of educational efficiency; mental hygiene. 

Messrs. Johnson, Barkley, Newman 

PSY 307 GENERAL APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

A study of the application of principles of psychology in medicine, law, advertising, sail- 
ing, vocational guidance, the arts and athletics- 
Mr. Barkley 

PSY 337 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern industry; methods of 
work, monotony, fatigue, accidents, motivation, and morale of workers. 

Messrs. Barkley, Drewes, Gray, Miller 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 438 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY II 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 337 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern industry; with par- 
ticular emphasis on human relations and supervision. 

Mr. Miller 

PSY 441 HUMAN FACTORS IN EQUIPMENT DESIGN 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Human factors in the design of machines and other equipment. Items of equipment are 
understood as extensions of man's capacity to sense, comprehend, and control his environ- 
ment. Includes problems in the psychology of information, communication, control, and 
invention. 

Messrs. Cook, Gray 

PSY 464 VISUAL PERCEPTION FOR DESIGNERS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The nature of the seeing process and its relation to architecture, industrial arts, and to 
the industrial engineering, and textile design fields. Topics include the basis of sight, 
perception of color and form, vision and illumination, psychological factors in visual design, 
and a unit of training planned to improve the student's ability to preceive visual form. 

Mr. Cook 

PSY 475 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 Summer session only 

The development of the individual child of the elementary school age will be the inclusive 
object of study in this course. Emphasis will be placed upon the intellectual, social, emo- 
tional, and personality development of the child. Physical growth will be emphasized as 
necessary to an understanding of the psychological development of the pupil. 

Mr. Barkley 

PSY 476 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

Mental growth, social development, and interests of adolescent boys and girls. 

Messrs. Johnson, Barkley 

PSY 490 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Social applications of psychology: social stimulation, response, and attitudes. 

Messrs. Barkley, Miller 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

PSY 501 INTERMEDIATE EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and six additional hours in Psychology 

Experimental study of problems in the major areas of general and theoretical psychology 
which have special significance in educational, industrial, and applied social psychology. 
Emphasis will be placed upon description of problems, study of methods, design of ex- 
periments, and procedures for the analysis and presentation of data. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman 

PSY 502 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of Psychology, including PSY 200, PSY 201 

A survey of the physiological bases of behavior including the study of coordination, sensory 
processes, brain functions, emotiona, and motivation. 

Mr. Corter 



296 Psychology 

psy 504 advanced educational psychology 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

An advanced course giving a critical appraisal and a consideration of the practical appli- 
cations for education of modern psychological findings. 

Messrs. Johnson, Newman 

PSY 511 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

A study of social relationships and their psychological bases; emphasis on those aspects of 
behavior determined by personal interactions; work will involve analysis of representative 
research studies, and individual projects. 

Mr. Miller 

PSY 514 CURRENT PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1 (1-0) f 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology 

A study of current developments in theory and research in several areas of psychological 

interests. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 530 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 302 

A study of the causes, symptomatic behavior, and treatment of the major personality dis- 
turbances, emphasis also placed on preventive mental hygiene methods. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 535 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

A study of psychological tests, with emphasis on proper selection and use of testing instru- 
ments; also a study of statistical procedures needed in the proper use of tests, including 
measures of central tendency, variability and correlation. 

Mr. Johnson 

PSY 550 MENTAL HYGIENE IN TEACHING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

A survey of mental hygiene principles applicable to teachers and pupils; practical problems 
in prevention and treatment of psychological problems in schools; case studies and research. 

Messrs. Barkley, Corter 

PSY 565 INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology. 

This course is designed for management personnel in industry and graduate students in 
psychology who wish to familiarize themselves with psychological approaches to industrial 
problems in industrial management. 

Mr. Miller 

PSY 570 INTELLIGENCE AND PERSONALITY: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT I 3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisites PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

An introduction to individual personality and intelligence testing, theoretical background 
of intelligence and personality. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 571 INTELLIGENCE AND PERSONALITY: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT II 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: PSY 570 

A practicum in individual intelligence testing with emphasis on the Wechsler-Bellevue, 
Stanford-Binet, report writing, and case studies. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 576 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Nine hours in Psychology, including PSY 476 or PSY 475 

A survey of the role of growth and development in human behavior; particularly at the 
child and adolescent periods. This course will pay particular attention to basic principles 
and theories in the area of developmental psychology. 

Mr. Johnson 

PSY 578 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology 

Nature, extent, and practical implications of individual differences and individual variation. 

Mr. Barkley 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PSY 604 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f or s 

Prerequisite: PSY 501 

Experimental analysis of problems of sensation, perception, learning, thinking, emotions, 
fatigue, and neuro-muscular reactions. Emphasis upon methods of experimental control, 
design of experimental apparatus, and accuracy of reports as these are related to labora- 
tory investigations in the field of applied psychology. 

Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman 



Recreation and Park Administration 297 

psy 606 behavior theory 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, a course in learning, Experimental Psychology and Statistics. 
A study ot the most fundamental considerations in behavior theory. Such topics as criteria 
of scientific meaningfulness, the nature of scientific explanation, the application of 
formal, logical techniques to theory analysis, the nature of probability, operationism, inter- 
vening variables, etc., will be covered. The aim of the course is to develop skill in 
handling theoretical concepts, the ability to analyze and evaluate theories, to deduce 
hypotheses from them, and to devise means of testing them. 

Mr. Cook 

PSY 607 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: One undergraduate course beyond General Psychology in Applied or Experi- 
mental Psychology. 
Application of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding of industrial be- 
havior. 

Messrs. Drewes, Gray, Miller 

PSY 608 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY II 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisites: One undergraduate course beyond General Psychology in Applied or Experi- 
mental Psychology. 
Practical applications of the methods of industrial psychology. 

Messrs. Drewes, Gray, Miller 

PSY 609 PSYCHOLOGICAL CLINIC PRACTICUM Maximum 3 hours f s 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology 

Clinical participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy and administraton of psy- 
chological tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults and children. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 610 THEORIES OF LEARNING 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology 

A study of theories of learning with emphasis upon applications of the principles of learning. 

Messrs. Barkley, Johnson, Newman 

PSY 612 SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

Scientific articles, analysis of experimental designs in industrial psychology, and study of 
special problems of interest to graduate students in Industrial Psychology. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 613 RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY Credits by arrangement 

Individual or group research problems; a maximum of six credits is allowed toward the 
Master's degree. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 635 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Stat 511 or equivalent 

Theory of psychological measurement. Statistical problems and techniques in test con- 
struction. 

Mr. Gray 

PSY 672 INTELLIGENCE AND PERSONALITY: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT III 3 (2-3) 
Prerequisites: PSY 570, PSY 571 Summer session only. 

Theory and practicum in individual personality testing of children and adults with em- 
phasis on projective techniques, other personality measures, report writing and case studies. 

Mr. Corter 



RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

REC 152 INTRODUCTION TO RECREATION 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is designed to provide instruction in the following areas: History and founda- 
tions of recreation including objectives, economic and social aspects, definition and im- 
portance; status of organized recreation in our modern society; certain applied principles 
of recreation; recreation leadership; activities and program planning; and tournament 
planning and administration. The course is of lecture-laboratory technique. 

Mr. Hines 

REC 153 AQUATIC SPORTS 2 (0-4) f ■ 

A laboratory course includes: the history of the techniques and methods of teaching 
swimming, modern methods of teaching diving, officiating, games, pageants, the use of 
small craft, life-saving techniques, principles of water safety, the organization and admini- 
stration of water safety programs and the maintenance of the swimming pool and water 
front. 

Mr. Stott 



298 Recreation and Park Administration 

REC 201 PLAYGROUND LEADERSHIP 2 (1-3) f s 

This course is designed to present to the student play activities of an active, semi-active, 
and quiet nature so that a selection can be made to fit a playground situation. Special 
emphasis is placed on the learning of low organized games, contests, relays and water 
activities and their practical application in an actual playground program. Stress is placed 
on the principles, techniques and tools of effective playground leadership. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 203 INDIVIDUAL CORRECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f 

The problems underlying the need for an individual physical education program for handi- 
capped students are discussed. The primary emphasis will be on the organization and 
administration of the individual physical education program in schools and colleges; the 
formulation of individual programs of physical education for the most prevalent types of 
disabilities found in the school population and the techniques necessary for effective 
accomplishment of the objectives of the program. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 204 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN HEALTH EDUCATION 2 (2-0) s 

A consideration of the most appropriate content and methods which should be in high 
school health education programs. Sources of materials are stressed. Public relations are 
studied. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 205 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f 

Presents critical studies of methods of instruction and procedures in supervision applicable 
to physical education. Provides observation in the required physical activity-service courses. 

Mr. Hines 
REC 207 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PARK ADMINISTRATION 2 (2-0) f s 

This course includes the study of the history, present status and the basic principles of 
operation of parks and park systems in America. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 251 SOCIAL RECREATION I 3 (0-6) f s 

This course presents material and information needed for conducting social play in the 
home, church, club, camp, on the playground and in the recreation center. It emphasizes 
the place of the leader in recreation music and drama. Stress is placed on the acquiring 
of technical knowledge of social activities, including rhythmics and square dancing, and 
the conducting of specific types of activities. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 252 SOCIAL RECREATION II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: REC 251 

A laboratory course is designed to develop leadership skills in recreation dramatics and 
music. Dramatic areas to be considered are: acting, children theatres, choral speaking, 
creative drama, play production, puppetry, story telling and stage design and equipment. 
Activities in recreation music will include: singing, playing, rhythmic movement, song 
creative and combined activites. Outside studies and assigned readings with reports are 
required. 

Mr. Crawford, Visiting Instructors 

REC 253 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 (3-0) f s 

This course is designed to give the student a professional orientation in physical education 
and the place of physical education activities in allied and related fields. It introduces 
the student to the program of physical education — its interpretation in the light of 
present day needs, its sociological basis, aims and objectives and a sampling of program 
activities. In the laboratory period stress is placed on the learning of skills and coaching 
techniques involved in executing and directing the simplest to the most complex type of 
activities performed on mats and gymnasium apparatus. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 301 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f s 

This course is designed to prepare students to meet the problems of organization and 
administration of physical education with the view in mind of making suitable adaptation 
to various related fields. It presents the solution to many of the problems facing the 
administrator and teacher in organizing and administering a physical education program 
with analogous comparisons of these problems to other areas in the field of recreation. 
The course is intended as a practical approach and a background for the student going 
into the physical activity field where problems of organization and administration assume 
major proportions in this area of work. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 315 PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ZO 213 or equivalent 

This course is designed for students in residence and for individuals in-service. Directors 
of community centers, boys clubs, coaches of athletic teams, athletic directors and others 
are confronted constantly with: the prevention and the care of athletic injuries. The 
course is of lecture-laboratory technique. 

Mr. Crawford 



Recreation and Park Administration 299 

rec 325 activities for the handicapped individual 2 (2-0) f s 

This course provides the students with methods that will motivate the atypical individual to 
improve not only his physical condition but also his outlook on life. To utilize modern 
educational principles and sport activities which will satisfy the handicapped individual's 
needs, interest and capacity To provide sources of information applicable to the problem. 
Outside studies and assigned readings with reports are required. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 331 SCHOOL CAMPING 2 (1-2) f s 

This course covers the history of school camping and outdoor education. The purpose 
of this course is to provide the student with the methods and techniques in planning the 
school camp program so as to furnish a laboratory experience in those areas of study 
that can best be learned in the out-of-doors. Practicol consideration will be given to the 
preplanning of school camping experiences. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 333 FIRST AID AND SAFETY 2 (1-2) f s 

This course stresses first aid and safety education in relation to the home, school and 
community. It strongly emphasizes safety principles as applied to activities of the gym- 
nasium, playgrounds and athletic fields. Laboratory will provide practice in first aid skill. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 351 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS IN RECREATION 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Completion of Physical Education requirement or equivalent 
The course provides for group instruction and laboratory experiences in the following 
sports: archery, bowling, golf, handball, tennis, table tennis, bait and fly casting, badminton 
and squash. Problems involved in starting and conducting a program of individual sports 
organized on a mass basis and designed to serve the interest of all people are studied. 
Officiating techniques applicable to individual sports are utilized. The course is of labora- 
tory character, and study of the professional problems involved with assigned readings 
and reports is required. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 352 TEAM SPORTS IN RECREATION 3 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: Completion of Physical Education requirement or equivalent 
The course provides for group instruction and laboratory experiences in the following 
games: football, basketball, baseball, volleyball and speedball. Problems involved in 
starting and conducting a program of group games organized on a mass basis designed 
to serve the interests of all people are studied. Officiating techniques applicable to the 
various games are utilized. The course is of laboratory character, and study of the pro- 
fessional problems involved with assigned readings and reports is required. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 353 CAMP ORGANIZATION AND LEADERSHIP 3 (2-2) f s 

This course surveys the development of organized camping and the educational, health, 
and recreational objectives of camping. Program planning and leadership training in 
community, private, agency and school camping is emphasized. Laboratory will provide 
practice in campcraft skills. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 354 PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HYGIENE 3 (3-0) f s 

This course presents the essential present-day knowledge of personal and community health. 
Emphasis is placed upon health problems, disease prevention, communicable diseases and 
their control, public health administration, school and industrial hygiene and various other 
health problems confronting the individual and the community. The course presents val- 
uable and interesting health information to college men and women in order that they 
might live more intelligently in terms of newer health concepts and also be better prepared 
to assume their responsibilities as citizens of their respective communities. 

Mr. Miller 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

REC 401 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF INDUSTRIAL RECREATION 2(2-0) s 

A study of existing programs of industrial recreation, their recreation, methods of finance, 
scope and problems is emphasized. Relationship of industrial recreaton to other programs 
of recreation is studied. 

Mr. Hines 

REC 404 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF RURAL RECREATION 2 (2-0) s 

A study of the organization and administration of rural recreation programs and facilities. 
Emphasis on planning programs of recreational activities for the rural community, the 
county-wide program, clubs and organizations. Study of existing programs of rural recre- 
ation, their operation and their problems will receive major attention. 

Mr. Hines 



300 Recreation and Park Administration 

rec 411 park maintenance and operation i 2 (1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course deals with: methods of operation of various park facilities for public use; 
interpretative and public use programs; information and education; park personnel admini- 
stration; and protection and law enforcement. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 412 PARK MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION II 2 (1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: REC 41 1 

This course will begin with a one-week tour of various types of parks and park systems. 
The following subjects would then be studied in detail: preventive maintenance, job 
planning and scheduling, modern maintenance techniques and maintenance materials. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 431 CAMPCRAFT 2 (0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: REC 353 or equivalent 

This course is entirely of a laboratory nature. It is designed to provide the student with 

skills, and methods of teaching campcraft and woodcraft. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 451 FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 3 (0-6) f s 

This course includes the history of park and recreation facility development and trends 
in recreation facility planning. Emphasis is placed upon the planning principles involved 
in the design and layout of recreation areas and recreation buildings. Field trips will 
enable the student to see the various types of recreation facilities. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 452 RECREATION ADMINISTRATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course deals with: the internal organization of a recreation department; financing; 

accounting and financial procedure; budget making and control; records, reports and 

filing; program planning and control; personnel policies and organization; and public 

relations. 

Mr. Hines 

REC 470 SUPERVISED PRACTICE 6 (0-18) f s 

This course is intended to provide the prospective recreation director with an opportunity 
to acquire experience in the skills and techniques involved in the organization and 
administration of recreation activities in an established program. Each student during his 
senior year will spend 10 weeks off-campus in a selected location. (A minimum of 225 
contact hours are required.) The student will have the opportunity to observe the activities 
and practices of trie recreation executive, to organize and conduct activities under 
supervision, to observe activities and practices of experienced recreation activity leaders 
and to observe the maintenance and operation of facilities. Prior to enrollment in this 
course, the student is expected to have completed the senior field trip consisting of visits 
to recognized programs of recreation throughout North Carolina. The student will have 
the opportunity to become familiar with the total recreation program. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 471 ORGANIZING THE RECREATION PROGRAM 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course includes the types of recreation opportunities to be made available to individuals, 
groups or communities to be served and the methods of providing these opportunities. 
Activities to be considered are classified as: arts and crafts; dance; drama; games, sports 
and athletics; hobbies; music; outdoor recreation; reading, writing and speaking; social 
recreation; special events and voluntary service. The lecture-discussion technique is used. 
Outside studies and assigned readings with reports are required. 

Mr. Hines 

REC 472 OBSERVATION AND FIELD EXPERIENCE 2 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to observe, appraise 
and evaluate: the opreation of program activities; teaching methods; administrative, 
supervisory and organizational techniques; procedures and conduct of advisory and com- 
mission meetings; professional conferences and society meetings. Students will be expected 
to complete this entire gamut. By use of field experience, the student will be expected 
to prepare written reports of observations. Only those experiences approved by the recre- 
ation faculty shall be accepted. 

Mr. Miller 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

REC 501 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN RECREATION 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: Completion of 20 hours credit in recreation courses or equivalent and a "B" 

average in recreation courses or equivalent 
A survey of specific problems in recreation. Aims to develop critical analysis. Forms a 
basis for the organization of research projects, for the compilation and organization of 
material in a functional relationship and for the foundation of policies. Follows the seminar 
procedure. 

Mr. Hines 



Rural Sociology 301 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES* 

RS 204 NORTH CAROLINA RURAL LIFE 2 (2-0) f s 

Introduction to the specific patterns of rural living in North Carolina; structure and function 
of the groups in which North Carolina rural people participate; major social institutions 
and their related problems; and organized efforts to improve community life in the state. 

Staff 

RS 301 SOCIOLOGY OF RURAL LIFE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman year 

A systematic sociological analysis of the characteristics, institutions and problems of rural 
life. Part I is a brief description of the basic concepts, the theoretical framework and the 
method of analysis of institutions and problems. Part II consists of systematic analyses of 
the major social institutions and their respective problems. Part III portrays the role of 
the community as an area of institutional functioning and societal integration. 

Staff 

RS 321 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL RESEARCH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Designed to give the student a basic understanding of the methods of sociological research. 
Reviews the scientific method and its application to the design of social research including 
the collection, analysis, and interpretation of social data. Appropriate ways of presenting 
the findings and of making the greatest use of the data are presented. Critical and objective 
thinking are stressed throughout the course. 

Messrs. Young and Mayo 

RS 322 INTRODUCTION TO RURAL SOCIAL WORK 3 (3-0) t 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Constructed to acquaint the preprofessional student with the subject matter of social work 
as well as its related professional fields. Attention is given to three major areas: (1) case 
work in various settings; (2) group work, and (3) community organization. Public and 
private agencies which employ persons trained in social work are studied. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 441 RURAL SOCIAL PATHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

A study of major social problems in modern society: physical and mental health, family 
instability, crime and penology, and minority group problems. A framework for analysis and 
understanding is presented and stressed throughout including a positive approach for pre- 
vention. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 442 RURAL SOCIAL STRUCTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of instructor 

Social structure is viewed in its two major dimensions: (1) vertically through the con- 
cepts of social stratification; and (2) horizontally as a set of basic social institutions 
interacting by means of a system of concrete social organizations. Particular attention is 
given to the place of the rural segment in the total social system. The bases of social 
cohesion which permit diversity within a functioning whole are examined. 

Mr. McCann 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES* 

RS 511 RURAL POPULATION PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

A study of population growth, rates of change and distribution. Considerable attention 
is given to the functional roles of population, i. e., age, sex, race, residence, occupation, 
marital status and education. The dynamic aspects of population are stressed: fertility, 
mortality and migration. Population policy is analyzed in relation to national and inter- 
national goals. A world view is stressed throughout. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 512 RURAL FAMILY LIVING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Values, patterns and levels of rural family living. Differentials and factors related thereto 
in the world, the nation and North Carolina. Analysis of selection problems, programs, 
policies and methods of study. 

Mr. Hamilton 

* Additional courses, suitable for rural sociology majors and graduates students, are 
listed in the offerings of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Other sociology 
courses especially suitable for advanced students and graduates are offered by the Depart- 
ment of Sociology and Anthropology of the University at Chapel Hill. 



302 Rural Sociology 

rs 513 community organization 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about desirable changes in 
community life. Community needs and resources available to meet these needs are studied. 
Democratic processes in community action and principles of community organization are 
stressed along with techniques and procedures. The roles of leaders, both lay and pro- 
fessional, in community development are analyzed. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 523 SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF AGRICULTURAL LAND TENURE SYSTEMS 

3 (3-0) f 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

A systematic sociological analysis of the major agricutural land tenure systems of the 
world with major emphasis on the problems of family farm ownership and tenancy in the 
United States. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 534 (Same as HI 534) FARMERS' MOVEMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of Sociology 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States and Canada 
principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist Revolt, 
the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Non-partisan League, co- 
operative marketing, government programs and present problems. 

Mr. Noblin 

RS 541 SOCIAL AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of Sociology 

Study of social agencies and programs and their implementation through specific organiza- 
tions in dynamic relation with the people whom they serve. Consideration is given to the 
relation of these agencies and programs to community structure and forces in rural society; 
coordination of the several types of agencies and programs; professional leadership in the 
local community; and problems of stimulating local leadership and participation. 

Mr. Mayo 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

RS 611 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature of scientific research in 
sociology. Assesses the nature and purpose of research designs, the interrelationship of 
theory and research, the use of selected techniques and their relation to research designs, 
and the use of modern tabulation equipment in research. 

Mr. McCann 

RS 621 RURAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Treats the genetic development of the rural personality and the interrelationship of the 
individual and the rural society. Studies the social psychological factors related to rural 
leadership, morale, social organization and social change, and examines the attitudes and 
opinions of rural people on current local and national issues. 

Mr. McCann 

RS 631 POPULATION ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Methods of describing, analyzing and presenting data on human populations: distribution, 
characteristics, natural increase, migration and trends in relation to resources. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 632 RURAL FAMILY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Emphasis is placed on the development of an adequate sociological frame of reference 
for family analysis; on discovering both the uniquely-cultural and common-human aspects 
of the family by means of cross-cultural comparisons; on historical explanations for 
variability in American families with especial concern for the rural family; and on analyzing 
patterns of family stability and effectiveness. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 633 THE RURAL COMMUNITY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

The rural community is viewed in sociological perspective as a functional entity. A 
method of analysis is presented and applied to eight "dimensions," with emphasis on 
the unique types of understanding to be derived from measuring each dimension. Finally, 
the effect of change on community integration and development is analyzed. 

Mr. Mayo 



Sociology 303 

rs 641 statistics in sociology 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 513 

The application of statistical methods in sociological research. Emphasis on selecting 
appropriate models, instruments ond techniques for the more frequently encountered prob- 
lems and forms of data. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 642 RESEARCH IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of chairman of graduate study committee. (Maximum of six credits) 
Planning and execution of research, and preparation of manuscript under supervision of 
graduate committee. 

Graduate Staff 

RS 652 COMPARATIVE RURAL SOCIETIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Sociological analysis of rural societies around the world with particular reference to North 
and South America. Special emphasis is given to cultural and physical setting, population 
comparison, levels of living, relationship of the people to the land, structure and function 
of the major institutions and forces making for change. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 653 THEORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 3 (3-0) % 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Required of all masters and doctoral candidates in Rural Sociology and recommended for 
all graduate minors. Designed to meet two objectives: (1) to introduce the student to the 
study of current sociological theory and (2) to survey events and trends in the historical 
development of rural sociology. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 671 SEMINAR Credits by arrangement 

Appraisal of current literature; presentation of research papers by students; progress reports 
on departmental research; review of developing research methods and plans; reports from 
scientific meetings and conferences; other professional matters. (A maximum of three credits 
is allowed toward the master's degree, and six credits toward the doctorate.) 

Graduate Staff 



SOCIAL STUDIES 



SS 301, 302 CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: For engineering students ENG 205, HI 205, EC 205; for others, permission 

of the Department 
An examination of the major concepts, methods and values that characterize modern 
thought in the fields of physical science, the humanities and the social sciences. The course 
utilizes the student's previous training, plus materials from the history and philosophy of 
science and the history of technology to demonstrate the essential inrerrelatedness of 
scientific, social, and aesthetic activity. 

SS 491, 492 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: For engineering students, SS 301, 302; for others, permission of the Department 
This course deals with concrete problems as they arise from day to day in the world 
of public affairs. These problems are studied and discussed in the context of a search for 
a more realistic definition of the limits of freedom and authority. Text materials are books, 
magazines and newspapers. 



SOCIOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

SOC 202 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

Introduction to the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to other men, the general 
laws affecting the organization of such relationships and the effects of social life on 
human personality and behavior. 

SOC 301 HUMAN BEHAVIOR 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the effects of social interaction upon individual behavior and personality; col- 
lective attitudes and behaviur as products of group experience; analysis of fashions ond 
fads, crowds, mobs, publics, social movements. 



304 Sociology 

soc 302 public relations and modern society 3 (3-0) f s 

The development and composition of social groups and the processes involved in group 
organization. These are analyzed in terms of the expanding functions of mass communi- 
cation in contemporary society. 

SOC 303 CURRENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) f s 

Study of the social and cultural aspects of specific problems such as crime, divorce, race 
conflict, illness, poverty, housing, recreation and personality adjustment to demonstrate the 
basic integration of society and community life. 

SOC 304 CONTEMPORARY FAMILY LIFE 3 (3-0) f s 

The social organization of the family with special attention to socialization, marital choice, 
kinship relations, and the social changes affecting family structure and functions. 

SOC 305 RACE RELATIONS 3 (3-0) f s 

Analysis of race relationships both in the United States and throughout the world with 
particular emphasis on factors producing the changes taking place at the present time. 

SOC 306 CRIMINOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

The study of causation, treatment, prevention, and control of criminality and juvenile 
delinquency. Special emphasis is placed on socio-cultural theories of causation and on the 
examination of court and correctional systems for adults and juveniles. Arranged field trips. 

SOC 401 HUMAN RELATIONS IN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 3 (3-0) f s 

Studies in the sociology of occupations, professions, and work with special attention to 
human relations in industrial plants and other work situations. 

SOC 402 URBAN SOCIOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the factors in the growth of cities; the relationship bewteen the design of 

cities and their social organization; detailed analysis of new developments in the serving 
of human needs. City and regional planning. 

SOC 411 COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS 3 (3-0) f s 

A survey of the institutions, organizations, and agencies found in modern communities; 
social problems and conditions with which they deal; their interrelationship and the trend 
toward over-all planning. 

SOC 412 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK 3 (3-0) f s 

A course designed to acquaint students with the various types of public and private social 

work and with remedial and preventive programs in applied sociology, social psychiatry, 
health, public welfare, and recreation. 

SOC 414 SOCIAL STRUCTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Studies of the major social institutions and systems of stratification; the organization of 
social systems as, for example, religion, education, and government; the functions of such 
structural components as age and sex groups, vocational and professional groups, and 
social classes. 

SOC 416 RESEARCH METHODS 3 (3-0) f s 

An analysis of the principle methods of social research; the development of experiments; 
schedules and questionnaires; the measurement of behavior. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SOC 501 LEADERSHIP 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

A study of leadership in various fields of American life; analysis of the various factors 
associated with leadership, with particular attention given to recreational, scientfic and 
executive leadership problems. 

SOC 502 SOCIETY, CULTURE, AND PERSONALITY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

Human personality from its origins in primary groups through its development in secondary 
contacts and its ultimate integration with social norms. Emphasis is placed upon the 
normal personality and the adjustment of the individual to our society and our culture. 
Dynamics of personality and character structure are analyzed in terms of the general 
culture patterns and social institutions of society. 

SOC 505 THE SOCIOLOGY OF REHABILITATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

The course stresses the social and cultural implications of the rehabilitation approach. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the social and personal problems of physically and mentally handi- 
capped persons. The interrelationships of the major social environments are considered at 
length in this regard. Objectives of the rehabilitation processes are analyzed in terms of 
the sociology of work. A major portion of the course is devoted to rehabilitation as a 
profession, particular attention being given to the diverse roles of specialists in this field. 



Soils 305 

SOC 510 INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY 3 (3-0) f t 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

Industrial relations analyzed as group behavior with a complex and dynamic network of 
rights, obligations and rules; the social system as an interdependent part of total community 
life; background and functioning of industrialization studied as social and cultural pheno- 
mena; analysis of specific problems of industry. 

SOC 511 SOCIAL THEORY 3. (3-0) * s 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of sociology, or equivalent work in related fields, and 
permission of instructor. 

The study of social theories from the earliest recorded thinkers to those of modern times; 
the evolution of theories of the individual, groups, culture, community, and society; the 

modern development of sociology and anthropology, and interpretive systems accompanying 
these developments. 

SOC 515 RESEARCH IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301 or equivalent 

Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such as problems of the family, 
population and social work; rural-urban relations; student success; American leadership. 



SOILS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

SOI 200 SOILS 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or 203. MIG 120 is recommended but not required 
The fundamental properties of soils and their relation to proper soil management. Geological 
information important to an understanding of soils and agriculture is presented for a 
better understanding of the interrelationship which exists between soils and management. 

Mr. Younts 

SOI 302 SOILS AND PLANT GROWTH 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, BO 103, PY 211 

An examination of the fundamental chemical, physical and microbiological characteristics 
of soils as related to crop production. The chemical and mineralogical composition of soils; 
ion exchange, soil reaction and the solubilities of plant nutrients; transformations between 
organic and inorganic forms of plant nutrients; water and air relations in soils; lecture; — 
demonstrations will be used to illustrate fundamental soil properties and to acquaint 
students with methods used in the study of soils. 

Mr. Hunter 

SOI 302 L SOILS AND PLANT GROWTH 1 (0-1) 

Prerequisites: SOI 302, CH 212 or 215 

Laboratory experiments to illustrate fundamental soil chemical and physical properties and 
to acquaint the student with techniques used in soil studies. 

SOI 341 SOIL FERTILITY AND FERTILIZERS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, BO 103 

History of plant nutrition and soil fertiltiy. Plant nutrition and growth as related to crop 
fertilization. Fertilizer materials, their manufacture, properties and usage. Fertilizer practices 
as related to a sound soil management program. 

Mr. Younts 

SOI 452 SOIL CLASSIFICATION 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: SOI 200 

The processes involved in the origin of soil and its properties are explained. Logical 
schemes of soil classification and soil management are developed based upon soil profile 
properties as operational criteria. The laboratories and field trips are designed to teach 
the student how to recognize certain soil profile properties and inferences which may be 
drawn from them. 

Staff 

SOI 461 SOIL CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: SOI 302 or permission of instructor 

The history and status of erosion and fertility conditions; the economic and social aspects 
of soil conservation; the effects of climatic factors, vegetation (forest, sod crops, cover 
crops and rotations), soil properties, and other management practices on soil conservation 
and fertility maintenance. 

Mr. Lutz 

SOI 480 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 0-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the School of Agriculture 

A student participation course in which the student will prepare and present thorough and 

documented discussions of important soil topics. 

Staff 



306 Soils 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SOI 511 SOIL PHYSICS 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, PY 212 

Physical constitution and analyses; soil structure, soil water, soil air and soil temperature in 
relation to plant growth. 

Mr. Lutz 

SOI 521 SOIL CHEMISTRY 4 (3-1) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 341, CH 212, CH 532 

Chemical composition and properties of soil, particularly concerning clay mineralogy, 
chemical processes of weathering and chemical properties of clays. The laboratory is con- 
cerned with procedures for the separation and identification of soil constituents and studies 
of certain fundamental properties of clay systems. 
(Offered in 1961-62 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Weed 

SOI 522 SOIL CHEMISTRY (Biochemical) 4 (3-1) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 341, CH 212, CH 532 

The chemistry of ion exchange phenomena of clay minerals and organic colloids in soils. 
Biochemical and mathematical concepts of the dynamic equilibrium involved in ion ex- 
change and nutrient uptake by living organisms. Laboratory consists of fundamentals and 
quantitative evaluation of the chemical nature and properties of soils. 
(Offered in 1961-62 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Volk 

SOI 532 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, BO 412, BO 421 

The more important microbiological processes that occur in soils; decomposition of organic 
materials, ammonification, nitrification, and nitrogen fixation. 
(Offered in 1960-61 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Bartholomew 

SOI 551 SOIL MORPHOLOGY, GENESIS AND CLASSIFICATION 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, CH 212, MIG 120 

Morphology: Study of concepts of soil horizons and soil profiles and chemical, physical, 
and mineralogical parameters useful in characterizing them. Genesis: Critical study of 
soil forming factors and processes. Classification: Critical evaluation of historical develop- 
ment and present concepts of soil taxonomy with particular reference to great soil groups 
as well as discussion of logical basis of soil classification. Laboratory comprises field trips 
for field study of soil profiles representative of great soil groups present in North Caro- 
lina, and a number of exercises illustrating methods of study of soil morphology. 
(Offered in 1960-61 and in alternate years) 

Mr. McCracken 

SOI 570 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by arrangements 

Prerequisites: SOI 201, CH 212 

Special problems in various phases of soils. Problems may be selected or will be assigned. 

Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 



(Students are expected to consult instructor before registration) 

SOI 611 ADVANCED SOIL PHYSICS 4 (arranged) 

Prerequisites: SOI 511, MA 301, PY 202 

An introduction into the usage of theoretical methods in soil physics. Lectures, literature, 
and discussions centered around problems in the movement of soil water, soil gases, and 
heat flow through soils. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Van Bavel 

SOI 622 ADVANCED SOIL CHEMISTRY 2-4 by arrangement 

Prerequisites: SOI 521, SOI 522 

A critical examination of current ideas in Soil Chemistry and related fields. Topics will 
include ion exchange, ionic and molecular absorption, electrokinetics, relations between the 
structures of mineral and organic soil components and their chemical and physical properties. 
(Offered in 1960-61 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Coleman 



Textiles 307 

SOI 632 ADVANCED SOIL MICROBIOLOGY 2-4 as arranged 

Prerequisites: SOI 522, SOI 531, CH 421, CH 422 

A critical examination of information relating to the nature and value of microbiological 
processes in soil. Segments of the course will be devoted to: (1) Formation, chemical com- 
position, and biological stability of soil organic matter; (2) Biological transformations of 
nitrogen; (3) Function of organic matter in soil; (4) Factors influencing nitrogen fixation; 
and (5) Plant-microbial relationships. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Bartholomew 

SOI 642 ADVANCED SOIL FERTILITY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 511, SOI 521, SOI 522 

Soil conditions affecting crop growth; the chemistry of soil and plant interrelationships; 
theoretical and applied aspects of fertilizer usage in relation to plant nutrition. 
(Offered in 1961-62 and in alternate years) 

Mr. Fitts 

SOI 651 ADVANCED SOIL GENESIS AND CLASSIFICATION 2-3, by arrangement f or s 

Prerequisites: SOI 521, SOI 551 

A critical study of current theories and concepts in soil genesis and morphology; detailed 
study of soil taxonomy. Topics include weathering and clay mineral genesis as related to 
soil morphology and genesis, functional analyses of soil genesis, properties of and processes 
responsible for soil profiles formed under various sets of soil forming factors, classification 
theory and logic as applied to soil classification, structure of soil classification schemes. 
Any of these topics may be emphasized at the expense of the others according to interests 
of students. 

(Offered in 1961-62 and in alternate years) 

Mr. McCracken 

SOI 680 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to agronomists 

reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any number toward 

the Doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

SOI 690 RESEARCH Credit by arrangements 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any number toward 

the Doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 



STATISTICS 

SEE EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 

TEXTILES 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
Textile Technology 

TX 181 INTRODUCTION TO TEXTILES 1 (1-0) f s 

Required of freshmen in all Textlie curricula 

A general introduction to the scope, products, organizations, and activities of the textile 

industry. 

One 1-hour lecture period per week 

Messrs. Dunlap, Klibbe 

TX 261 FABRIC STRUCTURE 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 283 

Required of students in all Textile curricula 

A study of the fundamental principles of fabric construction and weave formation of 

selected staple fabrics. Laboratory instruction is given in physical analysis and design 

techniques essential to the development of technical specifications for the production of 

woven fabrics. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week 

Messrs. Berry, Klibbe 



308 Textiles 

tx 271 upholstery fabrics 2 (2-0) s 

Required of students in Furniture Manufacturing 

A study of the basic principles of textile manufacturing and structure of woven fabrics, 

identification of classic decorative fabrics used for upholstered furniture coverings, with 

emphasis on nomenclature and physical properties and textile trade customs. 

Two 1-hour lecture periods per week 

Mr. Whittier 

TX 281 FIBER QUALITY 3 (2-2) f t 

Prerequisite: TX 283 

Required of students in all Textile curricula 

A study of the physical, chemical and aesthetic properties of the major textile fibers. In- 
cluded are methods of measuring fiber properties and interpretation of test results, com- 
plete analysis of typical stress-strain curves, influence of moisture on physical properties, 
and fiber identification. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Wiggins 

TX 283 FUNDAMENTALS OF TEXTILES 2 (1-2) I s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 or MA 111, or equivalent 
Required of students in all Textile curricula 

Nomenclature, flow of processes through weaving, yarn numbering systems, basic calcula- 
tions of machinery constants, textile production, and yarn and fabric structures. One 
1-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Klibbe, Lassiter, Moser 

TX 303 FIBER AND YARN TECHNOLOGY 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 281 

Required of all students in the Textile Technology curriculum. 

Technological and scientific concepts of fiber and yarn structures and modifications result- 
ing from processing. For all systems, the opening, cleaning and carding actions; blending 
of fibers stressing intimacy, methods, effectiveness, and influence on product; yarn struc- 
ture as a factor of blend, fiber distribution, twist in its many ramifications, spinning limits; 
composite yarn structures; bulk and yarn coverage; drafting methods, types, and limits. 
Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Pardue, Lassiter 

TX 304 FIBER AND YARN TECHNOLOGY 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of students in Fiber and Yarn Technology and General Textiles 
Elective for others. 

Technological and economic aspects of fiber and yarn processing including: packaging, pro- 
duction and efficiency levels; specialized yarn processes such as combing with economic 
justifications; design and use of specialty novelty yarns; economical and mechanical limita- 
tions of textile equipment. 
Three 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Stuckey, Pardue, Hamby 

TX 327 TEXTILE TESTING 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365, ST 361 

Required of students in all Textile curricula 

Quality control methods for textile processing, with emphasis on the measurement by 

laboratory instruments and techniques, and including a study of the mechanical and natural 

influences involved. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey; Mrs. Guin 

TX 365 FABRIC TECHNOLOGY 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisites: TX 261; TX 281 

Required of students in the Textile Technology curriculum 

Geometry of fabrics; properties of fabrics dependent on the weave, geometrical configura- 
tions and yarn properties, such as compressional resilience, air and water permeability, water 
repellency, creasing tendencies, abrasion properties, hand, and drape. Mechanical proper- 
ties of fabrics; transmission of heat, moisture, and air. Yarn additives and treatments; 
slashing and warp preparation, materials, and techniques. Non-woven structures. 
Three 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Whittier, Porter 

TX 366 FABRIC TECHNOLOGY 4 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 365 

Required of students in Fabric Technology and General Textiles 
Elective for others. 

Technology and economic aspects of fabric construction, design, and production. The 
classical weaves, their design, inherent uses, production techniques, and types of looms 
required. Marketing methods, with Worth Street and other trade rules and regulations. The 
loom as a production unit: types, nomenclature, basic and special mechanisms. Mill bal- 
ance. Fabric defects. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Moser, Berry 



Textiles 309 

tx 430 continuous filament yarns 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of Students in Fiber and Yarn Technology and Knitting Technology. 

Elective for others. 

A study of properties and processes applicable only to filament yarns such as texturizing 

and bulking. Detailed studies of throwing systems, engineering requirements of equipment, 

and yarn property changes resulting from processing. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour 

laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Wiggins 

TX 436 STAPLE FIBER PROCESSING 3 (2-2) f $ 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of students in Fiber and Yarn Technology 
Elective for others. 

A study of special systems of processing long staple, natural and man-made fibers, includ- 
ing woolen, worsted, direct spinning, Turbo Stapler, or Pacific Converter, and sliver to yarn 
methods. New concepts and research findings as applied to all yarn processes. Two 1-hour 
lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Pardue 

TX 478 DESIGN AND WEAVING 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 366 

Required of students in Fabric Technology 

Elective for others 

Advanced study of special weave formations and the techniques and equipment necessary 

to form these fabrics. Studies in depth of new developments and research findings in the 

areas of warp preparation, design, weaving, and fabric formation. Two 1-hour lectures and 

one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Porter, Berry 

TX 485 MILL DESIGN AND ORGANIZATION 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: TX 303; TX 365 

Required of students in the Textile Technology curriculum 

Application of economic principles of textile factoring, hedging, and other buying and 
selling problems. Inventory control, organization, and departmental functions of textile 
companies. Technical problems of plant site selection, plant design and layout, and selec- 
tion of equipment. Layout of a mill by each student. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour 
laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Pardue 

TX 490 DEVELOPMENT PROJECT I 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor 

Elective 

A problem of independent study assigned to seniors in the major field of study serving also 

as the laboratory period for senior level courses. One 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Staff 



Knitting Technology 

TX 342 KNITTING PRINCIPLES 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 281 and TX 283 

Required of juniors in Textile Technology and Knitting Technology. A basic course in 
knitted fabric construction with emphasis on the many types of stitch structures found in 
knitted textiles. Attention is also devoted to the equipment and mechanisms necessary to 
produce these structures. Two 1-hour lecture periods per week. 

Messrs. Lewis, Middleton, Shinn 

TX 441 FLAT KNITTING 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology 

Elective for others 

A study of the leading types of flat knitting machines including warp knitting machines, 

design possibilities and fabric adaptability. Two 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 

period per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 442 KNITTED FABRICS 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Textile Technology and Knitting Technology 

Design, analysis, and production of knitted fabrics, including flat, circular, and warp types. 
The economic aspects of the knitting process as a method of clothing production. Intro- 
duction to garment design, production and marketing. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour 
laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Shinn, Middleton 



310 Textiles 

tx 444 garment manufacture 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology 

Elective for others 

A study of circular latch needle and spring needle machines for knitted fabric production. 

Styling, cutting and seaming of the basic garment types for underwear and outerwear; 

standard seam types; high-speed sewing machines. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour 

laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 445 FULL-FASHIONED HOSIERY MANUFACTURE 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 
Offered by election 

Mechanics of the full-fashioned hosiery machine including practical training in its adjust- 
ment and operation. Attention is given to yarn preparation, knitting, inspection, finishing 
and packaging hosiery. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Lewis 

TX 447, 448 ADVANCED KNITTING LABORATORY 2 (0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology 

Elective for others 

Systematic study of circular hosiery mechanisms; hosiery types and constructions. Seamless 

hosiery production methods utilizing the newer synthetic yarns, toe closing methods, finishing 

processes, and marketing are emphasized. 

Mr. Lewis 

TX 449 TRICOT KNITTING 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 342 
Elective for juniors and seniors 

A study of basic types of tricot knitting machines with emphasis on mechanisms and 
fabrics. Attention is given to warp preparation methods applicable to the tricot machine, 
the characteristics of yarn made from natural and synthetic fibers as they affect pro- 
cessing into warp knitted fabrics, machine settings for proper qualities and ratios; economics 
of warp knitting, and end uses. Attention is given to fabric design and analysis. Two 1-hour 
lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 483 TEXTILE COST METHODS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365 

Required of seniors in Textile Technology except those in Management 
A study of cost methods applicable to textile mills with emphasis on calculations, the 
preparation of cost reports, and their use in cost control. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Messrs. Middleton, Shinn 



Textile Chemistry 

TC 201 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY I 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Required of Sophomores in Textile Technology 

A comprehensive course designed to familiarize the student with the chemical properties 
of all natural and synthetic fibers, and within their expected behavior under the various con- 
ditions to which they may be exposed. A brief survey of those parts of organic chemistry 
applicable to textile materials is included. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Rutherford 

TC 303, 304 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY III 3 (2-3) f s 

Corequisites: CH 421; CH 422 
Required of juniors in Textile Chemistry 

A study of the action of chemicals on fibers; methods and chemistry of scouring, bleach- 
ing and mercerization; preparation of typical dyestuffs and their application to fibers. Two 
1-hour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Hayes 

TC 307 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY II « (3-2) f 

Prerequisites: TC 201; TX 281 

Required of seniors in Textile Technology 

A comprehensive course covering scouring, bleaching, and dyeing of textile materials. Also 

fabric finishing, effects of heat and chemicals on fibers, and the economic aspects of 

different dyes and chemical treatments on fibers and fabrics. Three 1 -hour lectures and one 

2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Hayes 



Textiles 311 

tc 403, 404 textile chemical technology 5 (3-6) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 304; CH 422 
Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

Basic principles are applied to the study of three important areas of textile processing: 
dyeing, printing, and finishing. These areas are concerned with the chemical nature of 
dyes and other chemical agents applied to fibrous systems; with the chemical and physical 
properties of the various fibers; and with the mechanical aspects of the application of 
chemical materials to fibers and fabrics. The course includes: an extensive review of the 
various classes of dyes and their application to all important textile fibers and blends of 
fibers; a comparative analysis of dyeing machinery and processes involving special machin- 
ery and equipment; a survey of modern preparatory and bleaching for all important fibers; 
a study of the roller printing machine, and the principles involved in print formulations for 
the major classes of dyes and their application to the various fibers; a study of important 
mechanical, additive, and chemical modification type finishes for fabric. Three 1-hour 
lectures and two 3-hour laboratories per week. 

Mr. Campbell 

TC 411 TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS I 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 21 1 

Elective for students in Textile Chemistry 

Analysis and evaluation of textile chemicals and related materials such as water, soap, 
wetting agents, synthetic detergents, bleaching and stripping agents and finishing com- 
pounds. Identification and quantitative determination of materials employed in several 
categories of textile wet processing such as sizes, surface-active agents, dyestuffs and 
finishes. One 1-hour lecture and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Messrs. Campbell, Rutherford 

TC 412 TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS II 3 (1-6) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 211, TC 304 

Elective for students in Textile Chemistry 

Analysis of textile materials involving specialized instruments and techniques such as 

spectrophotometry, pH measurements, electrometric titration, viscometry, etc. One 1-hour 

lecture ond two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Messrs. Campbell, Rutherford 

TC 421 FABRIC FINISHING I 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 201 

Elective for students in Textile Technology 

Students in Textile Chemistry may not take this course for degree credit 
A general course in fabric finishing designed for students not majoring in Textile Chemistry. 
Emphasis placed on finishes used on garment-type fabrics, includng stabilization finishes, 
water repellency, crease resistance, moth and mildew proofing, fire-proofing, etc. Emphasis 
on chemistry of finishes varied to fit requirements of students. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Hayes 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 



Textile Technology 



TX 501 YARN TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR 2 (2-0) « 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor 

Elective 

Lecture and discussion periods are designed for students who are particularly interested 

in yarn manufacturing aspects of the textile industry. Subject matter will include such 

aspects as training methods, safety programs, modern mill design, specialized techniques 

in setting rates, employee relations and developments that arise from technical meetings. 

Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 521 TEXTILE TESTING II 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: TX 327 

Elective 

Advanced techniques for measuring properties of natural and man-made fibers, yarns, and 

fabrics. Interrelations of raw material, quality, processing characteristics, and end product 

properties. The application of the laws of physical sciences to evaluation of textile materials. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey 



312 Textiles 

tx 522 textile quality control 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: TX 521 
Elective 

Quality control systems for textile operations. Defect prevention methods, isolation of pro- 
cesses contributing to substandard quality, relationship between quality control department 
and operating divisions. Laboratory design, equipment and personnel selection, installation 
of quality control systems. Two 1-nour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey 

TX 524 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN TEXTILES 1 to 3 f s 

Prerequisite: TX 327; Senior standing, permission of instructors 
Elective 

Special studies in either the major or minor field of the advanced undergraduate or gradu- 
ate student. These special studies will take the form of current problems of the industry, 
independent investigations in the areas of textile testing and quality control, seminars and 
technical presentations, both oral and written. 

Staff 

TX 525 ADVANCED TEXTILE MICROSCOPY 2 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 327 
Elective 

Experiments, lectures and demonstrations in more advanced techniques of textile microscopy. 
Detailed studies of structures of fibers covered in lecture series, supplemented by experi- 
ments on lecture topics. Detailed study of all types of microscopes and their uses in textiles. 
Preparation of slides for photography. Uses of photomicro-graphic equipment. Lectures and 
laboratory arranged. 

Mr. Stuckey 

TX 551 COMPLEX WOVEN TEXTILE STRUCTURES 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 366 
Elective 

Consideration of machine-design factors and operational problems and factors peculiar to 
the manufacture of selected complex fabrics. Unique economic problems of fabric produc- 
tion. Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Berry 

TX 561 SPECIAL WEAVE FORMATIONS 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 366 

Elective 

A detailed study of the creation of weave formations which require specially designed let-off 

motions, take-up motions, doup heddles, swinging reeds, indicator chains, etc. Such fabrics 

as terry cloth, marquisette, leno stripes, seersuckers and mission net are included. Two 

1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Berry 

TX 562 JACQUARD DESIGN AND WEAVING 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 366 

Elective 

The application of punched card techniques to the design and manufacture of certain 

fabrics having intricate decorative patterns and special surface characteristics. Two 1-hour 

lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Berry 

TX 575 FABRIC ANALYTICS AND CHARACTERISTICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of students in Fabric Technology 

Prerequisite: TX 365 or TX 366 or TC 51 1 

Elective for others 

Correlation of fiber and yarn properties with those of the fabric. Fabric design features 

related to utilitarian as well as aesthetic values, with case studies of successful fabrics. 

Inspection and classification of defects with economic aspects. Engineering design of 

fabrics utilizing blends of fibers and yarns. Three 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Whittier 



General Textile Course 

TX 581 INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Required of all seniors in all Textile Curricula 

A lecture series with coordinated laboratory exercises designed to familiarize the student 

with the theory and application of instruments and control apparatus found in the modern 

textile plant. 

The studies cover the measurement and control of temperature, humidity, regain, chemical 

processes, physical finishing processes, time and temperature cycles, yarn and cloth tension, 

speed and fluid pressure. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Asbill 



Textiles 313 

Textile Chemistry 

TC 501 SEMINAR IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 2 (arranged) s 

Prerequisite: TC 403 

Elective for Textile Chemistry students 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal sources of textile 

chemical literature and to emphasize the importance of keeping abreast of developments 

in the field of textile chemistry. Particular attention is paid to the fundamentals of technical 

writing. Reports. Lectures arranged. 

Mr. Campbell, Staff 

TC 511 CHEMISTRY OF FIBERS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 422 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

A lecture course emphasizing: the theory of fiber structure; the relationship between the 

chemical structure and physical properties of natural and synthetic fibers; the nature of 

the chemical reactions which produce degradation of fibers; the production of synthetic 

fibers. Three 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Rutherford 

TC 512 (CH 512) CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 341 or CH 531 

Elective for Textitle Chemistry students 

Mechanisms and Kinetics of polymerization; molecular weight Description; theory of polymer 

solutions. Three 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Cotes 

TC 521 TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS III 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 421 or permission of instructor 

Elective for all Textile Technology students except those majoring in Textile Chemistry 
The work includes the chemical identification of fibers, the qualitative and quantitative 
analysis of fiber blends by chemical means and the evaluation techniques for dyed and 
finished materials. 

Graduate Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TX 601, 602 YARN TECHNOLOGY 3 (arranged) f s 

This course provides the student with an opportunity for intensive study of advanced topics 
in the field of yarn technology. 

Messrs. Grover, Hornby 

TX 621 TEXTILE TESTING III 2 (1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 522 

Design of textile laboratories, including conditioning equipment and instruments required 
for specific needs; performance of tests and analysis of data on industrial problems; 
specialized physical tests; inter-laborotory tests and analysis; study of A.S.T.M. specifications 
and work on task groups for the A.S.T.M. Society. One 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour 
laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Hamby 

TX 631 SYNTHETIC FIBERS 2 (arranged) s 

Prerequisite: TX 430 or TX 436 or equivalent 

Lectures and projects on advanced problems relative to the properties and processing of 
man-made continuous filament and staple fiber yarns. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 641, 642 ADVANCED KNITTING SYSTEMS AND MECHANISMS 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 441 or equivalent 

A critical study of inventions which have contributed to the development of the modern 
knitting industry; knitting needles and their adaption for specific uses; means for mounting 
them for individual and en masse operation; construction and functioning of cooperating 
elements including sliders, jacks, sinkers, dividers, pressing elements, narrowing and ten- 
sioning and draw-off motions, regulating mechanisms, timing and control chains and 
cams. Use will be made of patent literature which covers important developments in the 
hosiery industry. Three 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 643, 644 KNITTING TECHNOLOGY 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 8 credits in Knitting Technology 

Problems of specific interest to the knitting industry will be assigned for study and investi- 
gation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. Attention will be given to 
the preparation of reports for publication. 

Graduate Staff 



314 Zoology 

TX 651, 652 FABRIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION 3 (arranged) f s 

Application of advanced technology to the development and construction of woven fabrics. 

Mr. Whittier 

TX 681, 682 TEXTILE RESEARCH Credits by arrangement f s 

Problems of specific interest to the textile industry will be assigned for study and investi- 
gation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. Attention will be given 
to the preparation of reports for publication. The master's thesis may be based upon the 
data obtained. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 683 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Discussion of current scientific publications of interest to the textile industry; review and 
discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TC 605 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF DYEING 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 342 

Development of principles of thermodynamics, emphasizing applications in dye and fiber 

chemistry. 

Mr. Cafes 

TC 606 CHEMISTRY OF FIBER-FORMING HIGH POLYMERS 3 (arranged) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 341 or CH 531 

Composition and structure of high polymers; properties of linear polymers with particular 
emphasis on mechanical behavior; chemistry of high polymer degradation. Three 1-hour 
lectures per week. 

Mr. Cafes 



ZOOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ZO 103 GENERAL ZOOLOGY 4 (3-2) f s 

The study of animals with special reference to the morphology, physiology, and ecology of 
those forms that illustrate zoological principles. 

Staff 

ZO 205 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The biology and classification of the invertebrate animals with special reference to the 
forms commonly encountered and those which illustrate zoological principles. 

Mr. Miller 

ZO 206 VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 or equivalent 

A study of the fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, chiefly of North Carolina, 
their identification, systematics, life histories, observational methods used in the study 
of their behavior, and habitat relations. 

Mr. Hester 

ZO 212 HUMAN ANATOMY 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

A study of human anatomy with major emphasis on the structure and function of the 

musclar, skeletal, circulatory and nervous systems. Required of majors in recreation. 

Mr. Miller 

ZO 213 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

An elementary survey of human physiology. The central theme is the changes in the human 

body accompanying increased physical activity. The nature and mechanisms of these 

changes. 

Mr. Miller 

ZO 223 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY 4 (2-4) f s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

A comparative morphology of vertebrates demonstrating the interrelationships of the organ 
systems of the various groups. 

Mr. Harkema 

ZO 301 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, PY 211, CH 101, or CH 201, and CH 203 

Physiology of vertebrates with particular reference to man and the lower animals. 

Mr. Santolucito 



Zoology 315 

zo 312 principles of game management 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103, Elective for juniors and seniors not mojoring in Wildlife 
This course is intended to provide the student with a basic understanding of the major 
principles of wildlife management. It is designed especially for those individuals who antici- 
pate entering the fields of agriculture, forestry, agricultural extension or rural and in- 
dustrial recreation. 

Mr. Barkalow 

ZO 315 ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

This course is designed to give students a knowledge and appreciation of the parasitic 
habit. The biology, life history, pathology and control of the common parasites of domestic 
animals and poultry are covered. 

Mr. Harkema 

ZO 321 WILDLIFE AND NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in any school 

The importance of natural resources to man and the part they play in national and inter- 
national affairs; the principles which under-lie their conservation and the impact of over- 
exploitation on primitive and civilized societies. Emphasis is placed on the renewable 
resources, particularly wildlife. 

Mr. Barkalow 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ZO 452 ANIMAL MICROTECHNIQUE 3 (1-5) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, CH 203 

The theory and practice of preparing temporary and permanent histological mounts for 
microscopic study. 

Mr. Harkema 

ZO 501 ORNITHOLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The biology and classifications of birds. Field trips for the study and identification of local 
forms, including trips to Lake Mattamuskeet in February and the coast in May. Individual 
research projects on nesting populations. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 513 ADVANCED ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

The comparative physiology of selected systems. Topics will be chosen for detailed considera- 
tion in lectures, collateral reading, and class discussion. Each student will, in addition, 
prepare a term report. A few topics for study may be determined by the interests of the 
students and by their needs as may be expressed by the supervisor of their major work. 

Mr. Santolucito 

ZO 520 FISHERY SCIENCE 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103, approval of the instructor 

This course is intended as an introduction to the principles and methods of fishery science. 
Current theories and practices of fish management will be studied. Life history and biology 
of important game and commercial species. Survey of fishery resources. 

Mr. Hassler 

ZO 521 FISHERY SCIENCE 3 (1-6) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 520, ST 311, approval of the instructor 

An analysis of fishery research methods and objectives. Detailed studies of the procedures 
for estimating fish populations, annual reproduction, mortality rates, growth rates, and 
exploitation rates. The relationship between natural fluctuations in fisheries and environ- 
mental factors. 

Mr. Hassler 

ZO 522 ANIMAL ECOLOGY 3 (3-0) • 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, BO 103 

The interrelations of animals and their environments — land, fresh water, marine. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 532 (GN 532) BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103, approval of the instructor 
Recommended Correlatives: GN 411, ZO 301, BO 421 

Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible spectrum) on 
biological systems, to include both morphological and physiological aspects in a considera- 
tion of genetics, cytology, histology, and morphogenesis. 

Mr. Grosch 



316 Zoology 

zo 541 cold-blooded vertebrates (ichthyology) 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of fishes. Lectures, laboratories, and field 
trips dealing with the systematic positions, life histories, interrelationships, and distribution 
of the particular groups of fishes selected in accordance with the needs and interests of 
the class. 

Mr. Hassler 

ZO 542 COLD-BLOODED VERTEBRATES (HERPETOLOGY) 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of amphibians and reptiles. Lectures, 
laboratories, and field trips dealing with the systematic positions, life histories, inter- 
relationships, and distribution of the particular groups of amphibians and reptiles selected 
in accordance with the needs and interests of the class. 

Mr. Hassler 

ZO 544 MAMMALOGY 3 (1-4) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, ZO 223, approval of the instructor 

The classification, identification, and ecology of the major groups of mammals. 

Mr. Barkalow 

ZO 545 HISTOLOGY 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The microscopic anatomy of animal tissues. 

Mr. Roberts 

ZO 551, 552 WILDLIFE SCIENCE 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: ZO 206 

The principles of wildlife management and their application are studied in the field and 
laboratory. Designed primarily for seniors majoring in Wildlife Biology. 

Mr. Barkalow 

ZO 561 ANIMAL EMBRYOLOGY 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 

The study of fundamental principles which apply in the achievement of complex animal 
structure, including both invertebrate and vertebrate materials. Correlative laboratory study 
to provide training in the basic disciplines and techniques. This course is intended for 
advanced students in entomology, animal industry, poultry science and zoology. 

Mr. Alliston 

ZO 571 SPECIAL STUDIES Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: ZO 1 03, approval of the instructor 

A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in Zoology, accompanied by a 
review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three credits allowed toward the bachelor's 
degree, six toward the master's degree, and nine toward the doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

ZO 591 PARASITOLOGY I 4 (2-4) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 103, 223 

The study of the morphology and control of the parasitic protozoa and helminths of man, 
domestic and wild animals. 
(Offered in Fall 1961) 

Mr. Harkema 

ZO 592 (ENT 582) PARASITOLOGY II (MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY) 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or 312 

A study of the morphology, biology, and control of the parasitic arthropods of man, 
domestic and wild animals. 

Mr. Harkema 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ZO 603 ADVANCED PARASITOLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 591, 592 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism; taxonomy, physiology and 
immunology of animal parasites. 

Mr. Harkema 

ZO 614 ADVANCED ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 301, approval of the instructor 

Selected fundamental principles in physiology will be studied and interpreted for their 
relation to the vertebrates. Lectures and critical reports to promote acquaintance with 
general literature and recent advances. Lectures, discussions, written and oral reports. 

Mr. Santolurito 

ZO 622 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

The presentation and defense of current literature papers dealing either with the findings 
of original research or with fundamental biological concepts. 

Graduate Staff 



Zoology 317 

ZO 627 ZOOGEOGRAPHY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 522, approval of the instructor 

The geographic distribution of animals — land, fresh-water, marine. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 641 RESEARCH IN ZOOLOGY . Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology, approval of the instructor 
Problems in development, life history, morphology, physiology, ecology, game management, 
taxonomy or parasitology. A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the master's degree 
but any number toward the doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 



Engineering 

and 

Textile 

Buildings 




RIDDICK Engineering Laboratories 
Building is the home of the administrative 
offices of the School of Engineering and 
the Departments of Chemical Engineer- 
ing, Industrial Engineering, Engineering 
Mechanics, and Engineering Research, and 
Riddick Auditorium. The building is named 
for the late Dr. W. C. Riddick, a former 
president of State College. 




NELSON Textile Building 
houses the School of Tex- 
tiles and is located on the 
campus facing Hillsboro 
Street. The building is 
named for the late Dr. 
Thomas E. Nelson, the first 
dean of the School of Tex- 
tiles. 



Administration and Faculty 



New Look On Campus 





ULTRA-MODERN Bragaw Dormitory opened its doors to students in September 
1958. Featuring the latest in architectural design, the dormitory houses more 
than 800 students and was built at a cost of $2,000,000. 




HARRELSON HALL (model above), now under construction, offers a new ap- 
proach to classroom design. The building will be outstandingly different because 
it is round. The classroom will accommodate up to 4,500 students at one time 
and its cost will be 2Va million dollars. 



College Foundations 321 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

H. W. Taylor, Director of Alumni Affairs 

Objectives — The purposes of the Alumni Association are to promote the 
growth, progress, and general welfare of State College; to foster among 
its former students a sentiment of regard for one another and continuing 
attachment to their Alma Mater; and to interest prospective students in 
attending State College. 

Membership Activities — Active membership is available to all former 
students, regardless of length of stay at the college; members of the faculty, 
administrative staff, Agricultural Extension Service, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, teachers of agriculture in North Carolina high schools; and 
other persons who have successfully completed a short course at North 
Carolina State College and received a certificate therefor. 

Honorary membership consists of such distinguished persons as are 
duly elected to honorary membership in the association. The association 
meets annually during Alumni Week. Class reunions (scheduled in order 
that each class has a reunion every five years after graduation) are also 
held each year in connection with Alumni Week. Officers of the association 
are elected by the active members each year through the medium of a mail 
ballot. Local State College clubs are organized in most of the counties in 
North Carolina and in a number of cities in other states. 

Alumni Fund — This fund was established by the Alumni Association at 
State College in 1952 to replace the old dues paying program and provide 
a means through which the alumni may contribute to the advancement of 
the college. Each alumnus is invited to make an annual contribution. 

The State College News — State College News is published every month 
in the year by the Alumni Association and sent to contributors to the 
Alumni Fund. The purpose of the magazine is to keep association members 
in touch with the college and with each other. It carries news and pictures 
of former and present students and of the college. 

The Alumni Office — Records of both graduates and nongraduates are 
kept by the Alumni Office. The master file includes information on all 
former students; other files are arranged geographically and by classes. 
Biographical files are also kept. 

Serving as a medium of communication between alumni and the college, 
the Alumni Office, located in the Old Infirmary Building (now known as the 
Alumni Memorial Building) is official headquarters for alumni when they 
visit the campus. 



COLLEGE FOUNDATIONS 

L. L. Ray, Director 

There are eight foundations organized and incorporated under the laws 
of North Carolina which promote and support various programs of State 
College. 

The North Carolina State College Foundation, Inc., was organized on 
December 11, 1942, to foster and promote the general welfare of North 



322 College Publications 

Carolina State College and to receive and administer gifts and donations for 
such purposes. The Board of Directors is composed of alumni of State Col- 
lege and members of the Board of Trustees of the University of North 
Carolina. 

The North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, Inc., renders financial as- 
sistance through supplements in the development of strong teaching pro- 
grams in agriculture and assist the Extension Service and Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the School of Agriculture at North Carolina State 
College. 

The North Carolina Dairy Foundation, Inc., aims to promote and improve 
all phases of dairying in North Carolina through education, research and 
extension. A Board of Directors of sixty persons handles the affairs of the 
Foundation; these directors represent distributors, producers, and jobbers. 

The North Carolina Engineering Foundation, Inc., gives financial assist- 
ance to teaching, research, and extension in and through the School of 
Engineering. 

The North Carolina Textile Foundation, Inc., was formed to promote the 
development of the School of Textiles, and was incorporated on Decmeber 
31, 1942. Funds for this foundation have been raised largely from textile 
manufacturing plants and other corporations and industries closely allied 
to textiles. 

The North Carolina Architectural Foundation, Inc., was organized in 
January, 1949. Foundation funds are used for the promotion and advance- 
ment of architectural education at North Carolina State College. 

The North Carolina Forestry Foundation was incorporated April 15, 1929. 
The foundation has acquired a tract of land known as the Hofmann Forest, 
consisting of about 80,000 acres in Jones and Onslow counties, which is 
used as a demonstration and research laboratory for forestry students. 

Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc., was incorporated December 19, 1954, by 
the southern pulp and paper mills, for the purpose of supporting the pro- 
gram of pulp and paper technology in the School of Forestry. 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 



The State College Record, official publication of State College, is issued 
monthly and announces the results of special studies and of research by 
members of the faculty. Announcements concerning College Extension 
courses are also made through the Record Series. 

Brief notices of the short courses and special conferences which are held 
on the campus from time to time are issued by the Division of College 
Extension. The director of foundations likewise publishes brochures which 
are of special interest to North Carolinians. 

The Statelog is published monthly except for July and August by the col- 
lege to relate to the people of the state news of what is going on at State 
College and to strengthen the traditional link between the services of the 
college and the progress of the state. Subscription to the Statelog is free 
for all interested persons. 

Technical and Semi-popular Bulletins are issued by the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station when research projects are completed or when they have 
progressed far enough that the results are seen to be of definite value. 
General publications interpreting the scientific findings of the Experiment 



Trustees 



323 



Station or giving the results of Extension demonstrations are compiled by 
members of the Agricultural Extension staff and printed as circulars, 
folders, and pamphlets. Designed for popular use, these are usually written 
in a brief, clear style. Copies of these publications are sent free to citizens 
of the state upon request. Publication of these bulletins is announced by 
the press and radio of the state. 

Research and Farming, a quarterly bulletin journal written in popular 
style and giving the results of research and suggesting practical applica- 
tion of the information obtained, is published by the Experiment Station. 

Extension News, published monthly, is the official house organ of the 
Extension Service. Subscription to both Research and Farming and Ex- 
tension Farm News is free to citizens of North Carolina. 

Agriculture — An annual report published by the School of Agriculture 
contains a resume of activities of the Experiment Station, Extension Serv- 
ice, and Resident Teaching. 

Engineering School Bulletins, showing results of experimental and re- 
search projects in the School of Engineering, are made available by the 
Department of Engineering Research. 

Engineering Research News, a quarterly publication of the Department 
of Engineering Research, is a review of current activities in the School of 
Engineering. Copies of these publications may be obtained from the de- 
partment. 

Textile Publications pertaining to research may be secured from the dean 
of the School of Textiles. 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 



The enrollment at North Carolina State College for the 1960 fall semester 
totaled 6,510 students, 6,324 men and 186 women. 



Enrollment By Classification 



Enrollment By Schools 



Freshmen 


1810 


Agriculture 


766 


Sophomores 


1171 


Design 


300 


Juniors 


1113 


Education 


640 


Seniors 


1318 


Engineering 


3277 


5th Year Professionals 


20 


Forestry 


417 


Graduates 


755 


Physical Sciences and 




Unclassified 


204 


Applied Mathematics 


414 


Agricultural Institute 


94 


Textiles 


429 


Special and Auditors 


25 


General Studies (Auditors 









and Unclassified) 


138 




6510 


Graduate (Unclassified) 


40 






Agricultural Institute 


94 



6510 



TRUSTEES 



THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh 

The Woman's College at Greensboro 



324 



Trustees 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Terry Sanford, Governor, chairman, ex-officio, Raleigh 

Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent of Public Instruction, member ex-officio, Raleigh 

Arch T. Allen, secretary of the Board, Raleigh 

Miss Billie Curtis, assistant secretary. Chapel Hill 



TERM EXPIRES APRIL 1, 1961 

Name 

Wade Barber 
Frank H. Brown, Jr. 
Victor S. Bryant 
John W. Clark 
W. Lunsford Crew 
R. Floyd Crouse 
Horton Doughton 
A. C. Edwards 
Henry A. Foscue 
Dr. L. J. Herring 
Mrs. J. B. Kittrell 
John D. Larkins, Jr. 
Dr. Roy B. McKnight 
Dr. Harvey B. Mann 
C. Knox Massey 
Reid A. Maynard 
Glenn C. Palmer 
Edwin S. Pou 
Mrs. S. L. Rodenbough 
A. Alex Shuford, Jr. 
R. G. Stovall 
Dr. L. H. Swindell 
Mrs. C. W. Tillett 
Carl V. Venters 
J. Shelton Wicker 



City 


County 


Pittsboro 


Chatham 


Cullowhee 


Jackson 


Durham 


Durham 


Franklinville 


Randolph 


Roanoke Rapids 


Halifax 


Sparta 


Alleghany 


Statesville 


Iredell 


Hookerton 


Greene 


High Point 


Guilford 


Wilson 


Wilson 


Greenville 


Pitt 


Trenton 


Jones 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Lake Landing 


Hyde 


Durham 


Durham 


Burlington 


Alamance 


Clyde 


Haywood 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Walnut Cove 


Stokes 


Hickory 


Catawba 


Roxboro 


Person 


Washington 


Beaufort 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Jacksonville 


Onslow 


Sanford 


Lee 



TERM EXPIRES APRIL 1, 1963 

Mrs. Oscar Barker Durham 

Irwin Belk Charlotte 

Mitchell Britt Warsaw 

Mrs. Mebane H. Burgwyn Jackson 

S. N. Clark, Jr. Tarboro 

T. J. Collier Bayboro 

A. Roy Cox Asheboro 

Eugene Cross Marion 

Ben E. Fountain Rocky Mount 

O. Max Gardner, Jr. Shelby 

George Watts Hill Durham 

John H. Kerr, Jr. Warrenton 

M. C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

J. Spencer Love Greensboro 

D. L. McMichael Madison 

Rudolph I. Mintz Wilmington 

Thomas O. Moore Winston-Salem 

Ashley M. Murphy Atkinson 

Mrs. B. C. Parker Albemarle 

Mrs. Mary Mclver Stanford Chapel Hill 

Thomas Turner Greensboro 

John W. Umstead, Jr. Chapel Hill 

Herman Weil Goldsboro 

Sam L. Whitehurst New Bern 

Macon M. Williams Lenoir 



Durham 

Mecklenburg 

Duplin 

Northampton 

Edgecombe 

Pamlico 

Randolph 

McDowell 

Edgecombe 

Cleveland 

Durham 

Warren 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rockingham 

New Hanover 

Forsyth 

Pender 

Stanly 

Orange 

Guilford 

Orange 

Wayne 

Craven 

Caldwell 



Trustees 



325 



TERM EXPIRES APRIL 1, 1965 

Dr. Francis A. Buchanan 

Dr. Jesse B. Caldwell 

Lenox G. Cooper 

Marshall Y. Cooper 

Wilbur H. Currie 

Calvin Graves 

Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop 

Dr. John Gilmer Mebane 

Larry I. Moore 

Kemp B. Nixon 

Thomas J. Pearsall 

Clarence L. Pemberton 

James L. Pittman 

Mrs. L. Richardson Preyer 

H. L. Riddle. Jr. 

Roy Rowe 

A. B. Smith, Jr. 

John P. Stedman 

C. Lacy Tate 

Dr. John C. Tayloe 

H. P. Taylor 

W. Frank Taylor 

F. E. Wallace 

Cameron S. Weeks 

Mrs. George Wilson 



Hender8<mville 

Gastonia 

Wilmington 

Henderson 

Carthage 

Winston-Salem 

Asheville 

Rutherfordton 

Wilson 

Lincolnton 

Rocky Mount 

YanceyvUle 

Scotland Neck 

Greensboro 

Morganton 

Burgaw 

Dunn 

Lumberton 

Chadbourn 

Washington 

Wadesboro 

Goldsboro 

Kinston 

Tarboro 

Fayetteville 



Henderson 

Gaston 

New Hanover 

Vance 

Moore 

Forsyth 

Buncombe 

Rutherford 

Wilson 

Lincoln 

Nash 

Caswell 

Halifax 

Guilford 

Burke 

Pender 

Harnett 

Robeson 

Columbus 

Beaufort 

Anson 

Wayne 

Lenoir 

Edgecombe 

Cumberland 



TERM EXPIRES APRIL 1, 1967 

Arch T. Allen 

Mrs. Ed M. Anderson 

Ike F. Andrews 

Wm. C. Barfield 

Mrs. J. W. Copeland 

Frank Hull Crowell 

Percy B. Ferebee 

Bowman Gray 

Herbert Hardy 

W. B. Harrison 

J. Frank Huskins 

Mack Jernigan 

G. N. Noble 

Ernest E. Parker, Jr. 

Frank Parker 

Claude W. Rankin 

T. Henry Redding 

Mrs. Dillard Reynolds 

W. P. Saunders 

Evander S. Simpson 

Walter L. Smith 

Dr. Shahane Taylor 

Thomas B. Upchurch, Jr. 

C. M. Vanstory, Jr. 

Hill Yarborough 



Raleigh 

West Jefferson 

Siler City 

Wilmington 

Murfreesboro 

Lincolnton 

Andrews 

Winston-Salem 

Maury 

Rocky Mount 

Burnsville 

Dunn 

Trenton 

Southport 

Asheville 

Fayetteville 

Asheboro 

Winston-Salem 

Southern Pines 

Smithfield 

Charlotte 

Greensboro 

Raeford 

Greensboro 

Louisburg 



Wake 

Ashe 

Chatham 

New Hanover 

Hertford 

Lincoln 

Cherokee 

Forsyth 

Greene 

Nash 

Yancey 

Harnett 

Jones 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Cumberland 

Randolph 

Forsyth 

Moore 

Johnston 

Mecklenburg 

Guilford 

Hoke 

Guilford 

Franklin 



HONORARY LIFETIME MEMBERS 

John Sprunt Hill 
John Motley Morehead 
William R. Kenan 



Durham 

New York. N. Y. 

Lockport, N. Y. 



326 



Administrative Council 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Terry Sanford, chairman, ex-officio, Raleigh 

Arch T. Allen, secretary, Raleigh 

Miss Billie Curtis, assistant secretary. Chapel Hill 



TERM EXPIRES JULY 1, 1962 

John W. Clark 

John W. Umstead, Jr. 

W. Frank Taylor 



TERM EXPIRES JULY 1, 1964 

G. N. Noble 
Wade Barber 
Reid A. Maynard 



TERM EXPIRES JULY 1, 1966 

Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop 
Mrs. Rosa B. Parker 
Victor S. Bryant 



TERM EXPIRES JULY 1, 1968 

Thomas J. Pearsall 
George Watts Hill 
Rudolph I. Mintz 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



The University of North Carolina 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., President 
Donald Benton Anderson, B.A., B. Sc. Ed., M.S. 
Fred H. Weaver, A.B., A.M., Secretary 



Ph.D., Vice-President 



North Carolina State College 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

John T. Caldwell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor, Chairman 

F. V. Cahill, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the School of General Studies 

M. E. Campbell, B.S., Dean of the School of Textiles 

H. B. James, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Agriculture 

H. L. Kamphoefner, B.S., M.S., Dean of the School of Design 

J. B. Kirkland, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education 

J. H. Lampe, B.S., M.S., Dr. Eng., Dean of the School of Engineering 

A. C. Menius, Jr., A.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Physical Sciences and 

Applied Mathematics 
W. J. Peterson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 
R. J. Preston, A.B., M.F.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Forestry 
L. L. Ray, Assistant to the Chancellor in Charge of Development and Director 

of Foundations 
J. W. Shirley, B.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 
J. J. Stewart, Jr., B.S., M.A., Dean of Student Affairs 

K. H. Toepfer, B.A., M.I.A., Assistant to the Dean of the Faculty, Secretary 
J. G. Vann, Business Manager 



COLLEGE POLICY 

By action of the Trustees, the General Faculty includes all members of the College's teaching 
force above the rank of Instructor and all general administrative officers of the institution. 
In the President of the Consolidated University, the Chancellor of the College, and the 
General Faculty is vested final authority (under the Trustees) over all matters of College 
policy and activity. Under the General Faculty and Administrative Council, the Schools have 
separate Faculties and Administrative Boards (composed of all Department Heads) which 
have final authority over matters pertaining solely to their respective Schools, when not in 
conflict with Consolidated University and College regulations. 



327 
TEACHING AND RESEARCH FACULTY 

WILLIAM ELTON ADAMS, 

Coordinator of Student Affairs, School of Engineering, and Associate Professor of 

Mechanical Engineering, B.S., Ohio University; M.S., North Carolina State College. 
LOUIS SAMUEL AGNEW, JR., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, B.C.E., M.S.C.E., North Carolina State College 
CHARLES WALTER ALLISTEN, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, B.S., M.S., Mississippi; Ph.D., North Carolina State 

College. 
FRED J. ALLRED, 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
RAUL E. ALVAREZ, 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, Dipl. in C.E., University of Buenos Aires, 

M.S., North Carolina State College. 
MICHAEL AMEIN, 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering; B.S., Stanford University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
CHARLES NOEL ANDERSON, 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.E.E., M.E. Math., North Carolina State College. 
CLIFTON A. ANDERSON, 

Head of the Department and Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S.E.E., A.B., Uni- 
versity of South Dakota; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 
RICHARD LOREE ANDERSON, 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, A.B., DePauw University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa 

State College. 
ROY NELS ANDERSON, 

Head of Department of Occupational Information and Guidance, and Professor of 

Education, B.A., University of Denver; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
JAY LAWRENCE APPLE, 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
ARTHUR ALEXANDER ARMSTRONG, JR., 

Research Associate Professor of Textiles, B.Che., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

College. 
CLARENCE MONROE ASBILL, JR., 

Professor of Textile Machine Design and Development, B.S., Clemson College. 
LEONARD WILLIAM AURAND, 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Pennsylvania State College; M.S., University of 

New Hampshire; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
WILLIAM WYATT AUSTIN, 

Head of Department and Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, B.S., Birmingham 

Southern College; M.S., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
ROBERT AYCOCK, 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Louisiana State University, M.S., Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
AUSTIN ROBERT BAER, 

Associate Professor of Product Design and Head of Department, Georgia Institute of 

Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
•ERNEST A. BALL, 

Professor of Botany, B.S., M.S., Oklahoma University; Ph.D., University of California. 
STANLEY THOMAS BALLENGER, 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
WALTER ELMER BALLINGER, 

Associate Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Rutgers University; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan 

State University. 
CLIFFORD WARREN BARBER, 

Professor of Poultry Science, D.V.M., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity. 
WILLIAM JOHN BARCLAY, 

Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Oregon State College: E.E., Ph.D., Stanford 

University. 
•ALDOS C. BAREFOOT, 

Assistant Professor of Forest Utilization, B.S., M. Wood Tech., North Carolina State 

College. 
FREDERICK SCHENCK BARKALOW. JR., 

Head of Zoology Faculty and Professor of Zoology, B.S., Georgia School of Technology: 

M.S.. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
KEY LEE BARKLEY, 

Director of Applied Experimental Psychology Laboratory and Professor of Psychology, 

B.A., Berea College: M.A., Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
CATHERINE GREGORY BARNHART. 

Instructor in English, A.B., Salem College: M.A.. University of North Carolina. 
LUTHER WESLEY BARNHARDT, 

Associate Professor of History and Political Sc'enrc. A.B., Trinity College: A.M.. Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 
WILLIAM JOSEPH BARNHART. 

Assistant Professor of English, A.B., University of Tennessee: M.A., Ph.D.. Universitv 

of North Carolina. 



• On leave of absence 



328 FACULTY 

WILLIAM JAMES BARON, . 

Instructor in Product Design, B.A. in Industrial Design, University of Illinois. 
JAMES FREDERICK BARRETT, 

/l88i'8tant Professor of Military Science, Major, U.S. Army, B.A., Wesleyan University. 
ELLIOTT RAY BARRICK, , 

Head o/ Ani'maZ Husbandry Section and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Oklahoma 

A.&M. College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 
WILLIAM VICTOR BARTHOLOMEW, 

Professor of Soils, B.S., Brigham Young University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State Univer- 
sity. 
ANDREW JACKSON BARTLEY, 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.A., B.S., M.A., University of Missouri. 
EDWARD GUY BATTE, 

Head, Veterinary Section and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., A.&M. 

College of Texas. 
ERNEST OSCAR BEAL, tt . 

Associate Professor of Botany, B.A., North Central College; M.S., Ph.D., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa. 
HOMER EDWIN BEAM. 

Visiting Lecturer in Agricultural Education, B.S., M. of Agricultural Education, North 

Carolina State College. 
HARRY GEDDIE BEARD, 

Instructor in Agricultural Education, B.S., M. of Agricultural Education, North Caro- 
lina State College. 
EUSTACE O. BEASLEY, 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
KENNETH ORION BEATTY, JR., 

Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S. Ch.E., M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 
NEIL McLAURIN BEATTY, 

Instructor in Engineering Graphics, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JAMES F. BEEMAN, 

Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
BURTON FLOYD BEERS, 

Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Hobart College, M.A., Ph.D., 

Duke University. 
NORMAN ROBERT BELL, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Cornell 

University. 
THOMAS ALEXANDER BELL, 

Associate Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Wofford College; M.S., North Carolina 

State College. 
WILLIAM CALLUM BELL, 

Research Professor of Ceramic Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
RICHARD NEIL BERRIER, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
ERNEST BEZOLD BERRY, 

Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., Clemson College. 
BIBHUTI BHUSHAN BHATTACHARYYA, 

Visiting Associate Statistician of Experimental Statistics, B. S., Presidency College; 

M.S., Calcutta University; Ph.D., London School of Economics and Political Science. 
RICHARD HUGH BIGELOW, 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S., Michigan State College; M.S.C.E., North 

Carolina State College. 
GEORGE LEE BIRELINE. JR. 

Assistant Professor of Design, B.F.A. Bradley University. 
JOHN WILLIAM BISHIR, 

Instructor in Mathematics, A.B., University of Missouri; M.S., University of Iowa. 
CHARLES EDWIN BISHOP, 

Head of Department and William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agricultural Economics, 

B.S., Berea College; M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
THOMAS JACKS BLALOCK, 

Assistant Professor in Chemistry, B.S., Presbyterian College; M.A., University of North 

Carolina. 
WILLIAM JOSEPH BLOCK, 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, B.S., Eastern Illinois State College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Hlinois. 
WILLIAM LOWRY BLOW, 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
GEORGE BENJAMIN BLUM, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 
College. 
THOMAS NELSON BLUMER, 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Pennsylvania State College; Ph.D., Michigan State 
College. 
JOHN FRANCIS BOGDAN, 

Professor of Textiles and Director of Processing Research, B.T.E., Lowell Textile In- 
stitute. 



• On leave of absence 



Faculty 329 

carey hoyt bostian. 

£ r Z fesa ?* <>f Genetics. A.B.. Catawba College; M.S.. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh- 
D.Sc (Hon.) Wake Forest College. Catawba College; D. Honoris Causa. National Uni- 
versity of Engineering, Peru. 

HENRY DITTLMUS BOWEN, 

CoUel ! e lt ' !, ProfeMOr of Agricultural Engineering, B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D., Michigan State 

THOMAS GLENN BOWERY, 

£ e ! ear £u £ r0 4 e T r of . Pl * nt Chemistry (Field Crops), B.S., Michigan State University; 
M.a., rn.D., Rutgers University. 
EDWARD HOSMER BRADFORD, 

GARNETtl.^R^FORV 6 ^'^ "*■ LOT ™ U TeXtUe l ^^ 

CHA / RtE^ t rAY n MON^R U AiE ^ R. Cm<>m, ' C8 • ^^ M " S - UniVCr8ity ° f **"**'' 

5k£*° r ° f CiVil EngineeHn9 ' B - s -E-. E.M., Michigan CoUege of Mining and Tech- 
VESTER ROBERTSON BRANTLEY, 

EDGE^PAsSirB&NTLYr 1 ^ ^ "^ W " k * F ° reSt C ° Uege ' 

uS?vOT W ity P of / IlHn^is 3/ ° W ' En ° in€erin9 ' B - c - E - North Carolina State College; M.S.C.E., 
PAUL ARNOLD BREDENBERG. 

Ya1e C Un1vSy S8<>r 0/ Philosophv and R eligion. B.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
CHARLES HENRY BRETT 

St*ate C Co e ilege 0/e880r ° f Entomolo9y ' BS - M.S.. University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Kansas 
ROBERT V. BRICKELL, 

RIC^AR^B^IGHT^ *"*•* "^ *•*" U ™ ersi * ° f Mississippi. 
FRANT ELUOTT BRILEY?** m,V<rf £nff, ' neennff ' BS - MS - Stat « University of Iowa. 

Xo 3 r^cZroLl ndU * trial ATtS ' ■*" N ° nh Carolina State Coll «e: M.Ed.. University of 
CHARLES ALOYSIUS BRIM. 

^lmrAe^brSn 0/ Fidd Crop8 ' BS - MS - PhD ' University of NebrMk »- 

R0BERT"cHAR\fs%r0OKS' VeC,M,,,, ' C8 ' BCE> North C&T ° liD * St * te C ° llege ' 
KINGr7cHARD B^Sst"^ *"" , ~ fe * BS ' M ' S - North Carolina State CoUege. 

CoUege^ AM<Mri ' a '« *■ Engineering Research, B.M.E.. B.I.E., North Carolina State 
EDMOND JOSEPH BROWN, 
HENRT^WELrBRO^N.^ 8 ' "^ M ' S - N ° rth *"*» SUte C ° Ue * e - 

vewft? "of ffiofe*"" 0/ Geolo9ical En 9ineering, A.B., Berea CoUege; M.S.. Ph.D.. Uni- 
MARVIN LUTHER BROWN, JR 

Sv'VpefnSZnta* ^'^ *"'""• AB " Ha ~ rford CoUe se; A -M-> Ph.D., Uni- 
TALMAGE THURMAN BROWN 

•THEODORE CEc7rBR°OWN^ tn/ **""' "" M " S - N ° rth CmoUm State Cdte ««- 

i^S.srg^TcS / roi£ e Vu^C^" Ctr, "" < '- B - SME - ME - UniVCrSity °< Ken " 
CHARLES DOUGLAS BRYANT. 

Kltlte CoUege"^ tttr0i £efttcaf,<w ' BS - M - of Agricultural Education. North Caro- 
RALPH C. BRYANT.' 
PAuWui SS0 N F<>re *' Ec0n0miC8 - BS ' MF - Yale University; Ph.D.. Duke University. 

PVnill'v ^ M * 1 te »L t Professor of Architecture. French Government Diploma in Arch 
RObIpS &%3£$&£®i ^ B —A r ts. Paris. France. 

of Chicago*' Afa " lCffM,tl ' C8 ' BA " M- A - University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University 
HARVEY LINDY BUMGARDNER. 

i^tort'iSZy&if™ 1 '** ^^^ M - "^ Car ° lina State CM ^ *■*" PhD - 
•ROBERT LOGAN BUNTING, 

robertpasSaTbu^~jr ,, ' ct - M - A " PhD - Universky of chicaKO - 

FRED S vTRGV'cAmLt r jR e : *•***" N ° rth Car0Hna SUtC C °» ege - 

B a" MA e \1^^L-°rl G r^K S t ,Mf, ' e i^ d ?* /e !r r 0/ H,>tor » and ^rtfcaZ Science, 
„~~~ A .^ MA., University of Nebraska; Ph.D. Yale University 
GEORGE CHARLES CALDWELL um%ersity. 

AaMeia t ' Professor of Mathematics. A.B.. M.A.. University of North Carolina. 
• On leave of absence 



330 Faculty 

john tyler caldwell. 

Chancellor of North Carolina State College and Professor of Political Science, B.S., 

Mississippi State College; M.A., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., 

Princeton University. 
HORACIO CAMINOS. 

Visiting Professor of Architecture, Dipl. in Arch., University of Buenos Aires. 
KENNETH STODDARD CAMPBELL, 

Professor of Textile Chemistry, B.S., Clemson College: B.S., Bates Collej-e. 
MALCOLM EUGENE CAMPBELL, 

Dean of the School of Textiles, Graduate of the New Bedford Textile Institute; B.S., 

Clemson College; M.S.C. (Hon.), New Bedford Institute of Technology; D.Tex., Phila- 
delphia Textile Institute; D.Tex., Clemson College; Dr. Honoris Causa, National Univer- 
sity of Engineering, Peru. 
WILLIAM VERNON CAMPBELL, 

Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., Mississippi State College; Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College. 
EMMETT JOHN CANADAY, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., William Jewell College; M.A., University of 

Missouri. 
THOMAS FRANKLIN CANNON, 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

Ohio State University. 
THELMA JOYCE CARAWAY, 

Instructor of Mathematics, A.B., Alabama College; M.A., University of Arkansas. 
IRVING THEODORE CARLSON, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., Washington State College; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 
ALEXANDER A. CARLYLE, 

Research Engineer, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
ADGER B. CARROLL, 

Instructor in Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., Clemson College. 
ROBERT GORDON CARSON, JR., 

Director of Instruction, School of Engineering, and Professor of Industrial Engineering, 

B.S., Clemson College; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of 

Michigan. 
HAROLD B. CARTER, 

Operations Engineer, Nuclear Reactor Project, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
ROY MERWIN CARTER, 

Professor of Wood Technology, B.S.F., University of Minnesota; M.S., Michigan State 

College. 
LEO THOMAS CARUTHERS, JR., 

Radiological Safety Officer of the Safety and Health Committee, B.S., University of 

Richmond. 
DAVID MARSHALL CATES, 

Assistant Director, Chemical Research, Department of Textile Research, and Associate 

Professor of Textile Chemistry, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; M.A., Ph.D., 

Princeton University. 
JOHN WESLEY CELL, 

Head of Department and Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Illinois. 
ROBERT DONALD CESS, 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., Oregon State College; 

M.S.M.E., Purdue University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
RICHARD BRUCE CHALFANT, 

Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., University of Akron; M.S., Ph.D., University 

of Wisconsin. 
DOUGLAS SCALES CHAMBLEE, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D.. Iowa State 

University. 
LARRY STEPHEN CHAMPION, 

Instructor in English, A.B., Davidson College; M.A., University of Virginia. 
JESSE CHAPPELL, JR., 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOE SENTER CHAPPELL, 

Research Assistant of Agricultural Economics, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., 

Oklahoma State University. 
MARY ANN CIPOLIONI, 

Assistant Statistician of Experimental Statistics, B.A., M.S., West Virginia University. 
JOSEPH DEADRICK CLARK, 

Professor of English, B.A., Columbia University; M.A., Harvard University. 
LEWIS JAMES CLARKE, 

Visiting Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture; Dipl. in Arch., School of Arch., 

Leicester; Dipl. in L.D., Kings College, University of Durham, England; MX. A., 

Harvard University. 
WILLIAM SPURGEON CLARKE, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, B.A., Wake Forest College. 
JOHN MONTGOMERY CLARKSON, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Wofford College; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., Cornell 

University. « 

JOSEPH RAY CLARY, 

Instructor in Agricultural Education, B.S., M. of Agricultural Education, North Caro- 
lina State College. 



Faculty 331 

albert j. clawson. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. B.S.. University of Nebraska; M.S.. Kansas 
State College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
CARLYLE NEWTON CLAYTON, 

MAURICE' HILL ClI™^ ^' BS " ^^^ C ° Uege: PhJ) " V™*™* ° f Wisconsin. 
Nor^cirolinJl^Cofeg?"^ *«*«" fe * B *- Wake Fo«.t College; M.E.Math.. 
JOHN L. CLEMENTS. 

GROVER"ctE^^ND a c6 5 BB: at, ' <W ' M " MA " UniVCr8ity ° £ N ° rth Car ° lina - 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., M.S.. University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of 
Virginia. ' 

TOMMY COBB, 

FREDT E RWrRtcOCH / RAN. SC,enCe ' "^ TaU Chrirttan Vni ^^ 

K^if-""^ and Professor of Horticulture, B.S.. Clemson College. M.S.. Louisi- 

S / ^ph 0/ D.fSS , sSS<SSSf iet and GenetiC8 ' B - s - MS - North CaroHna state 

JAMES LAWRENCE COLE. 

•NATaTm t EL , TERRY COLEMAN. 6 " ° berHn ^'^ "^ PrinCet ° D U ™ersity. 

K? w r Ne , al R *y n ° ld * Distinguished Professor of Soils, B.A.. Knox CoUege; Ph.D., 
JNortn Carolina State College 
HERBERT COLLINS, 

Un?verTity Pr0/C8SOr ° f Sociolo9y and Anthropology, B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Duke 

NORVAL WHITE CONNER, 

Director of Engineering Research and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.. M E 

«rT T y , T r fw 1 ?. m Polytechni(: In stitute; M.S., Iowa State CoUege. 

WILLIAM STOKES CONNOR, JR.. g 

Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S.. Davidson College. M.A.. Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

FREEMAN WALDO COOK, 

il^X* P ?° fe A 8 Z °l P V d \ r >l Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State CoUege. Ph.D.. 
Agricultural and Mechanical CoUege of Texas 
HILLIARD D. COOK, 

Tech S noro t gy Pr0/e88 ° r ° f PVlP "^ P ° Per Technolo9y ' B - S - Massachusetts Institute of 
JOHN OLIVER COOK, 

W* C 'p(; if r °# Mor v 0/ , P T s y c . holoa V- B.A., University of Chicago; M.A., University of 
iowa; Fh.D., New York University. 
HENRY CHARLES COOKE, 

ARTH 8 UR a WELLtcOOPER. af, ' em0tl ' C8 ' B " S - "*- Korth Car ° Hna St&te C °" eKe - 

Assistant Professor of Botany, B.A.. M.A.. Colgate University; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan. 

NELVILLE E. COOPER. 

WIL / LIA r M C EARL P COOPER <ZM< ' at^<> "• BS "' E1 ° n C ° UeSe: M ' A - Universit y ° f North Carolina. 

Associate Professor of' Plant Pathology, B.S., Arkansas State A.&M. College. M.S.. 
ALO^O^EEM^N Cofe "^ M& ™ State V**™^ 
RALPH° C LE C LA P ND /<! COPe! C,iemiatrV - B " E - Ph - D ' Vanderbilt University. 

iril^Stateu'n'vwit' Indu8trM En oineering, B.S.M.E.. B.S.Ind.E., M.Ed., Pennsyl- 
WILL ALLEN COPE.™ 1 

^r\l r tJo^i t 7L Pr &°I ° f FieM Cr ° PS ' BS - MS - Al ' burn U ->versity. Ph.D.. 
FRANKLIN E. CORRELL, 

HAROLD MAXW / ELL r C0RTER , ' C,t/ ' ,,re ' BS " MS " N ° rth C »^™ State C ° ,,e ^ 

Je^XnlS^Universfty ^ TeaChCrS C °' We (L °° k HaVe "' Pa): MEd - PhD ' 
DANIEL NARCISSE COTE 

ARTHUR JAMES COU'-TU" 1 "'' BS - "" "* ^ XJ ^^ i ^ 

ft^:'1?a^te,„?s1S^Ki FC0Wm,> '' BS - MS " UniVCrSlty ° f Connecticut '- 
STUART D. COWARD, 

BT a Tri-s1«te C Cofle < ? InduatrM E ^erimentol Program, M.S.. Syracuse University; 
JOSEPH H. COX. ° Cge " 

Associate Professor of Design. B.F.A., John Herron Art School: M.F.A., University of 



• On leave of absence 



332 Faculty 

doris lee craig. 

Research Instructor in Soils, B.A., Winthrop College; M.A., University of North Caro- 
lina. 
FRANK RANKIN CRAIG. 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; D.V.M.. 

University of Georgia. 
•HARRIS BRADFORD CRAIG, 

Instructor in Animal Industry, B.S., Clemson College; M.S., North Carolina State College. 
MAX ARNOLD CRAIG. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Captain, Ordnance Corps, U. S. Army, B.S., 

Clemson A and M. 
WINIFRED HARD1SON CRANOR, 

Research Instructor in Textile Research, B.S., Woman's College of the University of 

North Carolina. 
ALBERT CRAWFORD, 

Assistant Professor of Recreation and Park Administration, B.S., Appalachian State 

Teachers College; M. Ed., University of North Carolina. 
PAUL DAY CRIBBINS, 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S. Marine Transp., U. S. Merchant Marine 

Academy; B.S.C.E., University of Alabama; M.S.C.E., Ph.D., Purdue University 
ARTHUR JAMES CROWLEY, 

Research Instructor in Field Crops, B.S., Illinois State Normal University; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 
KELLY RAYGENE CRUMP, 

Instructor in Engineering Graphics, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
MAYNARD CLARENCE CUSWORTH, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, B.S., University of Illinois. 
PHILIP HARVEY DAVIS, 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., M.A., Miami University. 
WILLIAM ROBERT DAVIS. 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., M.S., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D.. University 

of Gottingen, Germany. 
STEPHEN WALLACE DERBYSHIRE, 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.S. in Ceramic Engineering, North Car- 
olina State College. 
PAUL HAROLD DERR. 

Head of Department and Professor of Physical Education, B.S., University of Illinois; 

M.A., New York University. 
JAMES WILLIAM DICKENS. 

Research Instructor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
EARL ROGER DICKEY, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, B.S., University of Maryland. 
CHARLES WILLIAM DILL, 

Instructor of Animal Industry, B.S., Berea College; M.S., North Carolina State College. 
EMMETT URCEY DILLARD. 

Associate Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Berea College; M.S., North Carolina State 

College; Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
DANIEL ROBERT DIXON, 

Lecturer in Economics, A.B., College of William and Mary; LL.B., Duke University; 

LL.M., New York University. 
WESLEY OSBORNE DOGGETT, 

Associate Professor of Physics, B.N.E., B.E.E., North Carolina State College; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 
JESSE SEYMOUR DOOLITTLE, 

Professor of Mechanical Enoineering, B.S., Tufts College; M.S., Pennsylvania State 

College. 
ROBERT ALDEN DOUGLAS, 

Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 
JOSEPH CLYDE DOWDLE, 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering, B.S., E.E., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 

E.E., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
MURRAY SCOTT DOWNS, 

Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Randolph-Macon College; 

M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 
DONALD WILLIAM DREWES, 

Assistant Professor of Psychology, B.S., Iowa State College; M.A., State University of 

Iowa; Ph.D., Purdue University. 
JOHN WESLEY DUDLEY, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., Purdue University; M.S., Ph.D., 

Iowa State University. 
GEORGE HEYWARD DUNLAP, 

Textile Consultant and Director of Textile Placement Bureau, B.S., Clemson College. 
FRED L. EARGLE, 

Industrial Specialist, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN BYNUM EASLEY, 

Instructor in English, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
PRESTON WILLIAM EDSALL, 

Head of Department and Professor of History and Political Science, B.S.. New York 

University; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton University. 



* On leave of absence 



Faculty 



333 



JENNINGS B. EDWARDS, JR., 

Associate Professor of Physical Education, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.A., 

University of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM F. EDWARDS, 

Assistant Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 

HERBERT GARFIELD ELDRIDGE, JR., 

Assistant Professor of English, B.A., M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 
GERALD HUGH ELKAN, 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, B.A., Brigham Young University; M.S., Pennsyl- 
vania State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
CECIL DEAN ELLIOTT, 

Associate Profesor of Architecture, B.S., B.Arch., University of Oklahoma; M. Arch., 

Harvard University. 
ROBERT NEAL ELLIOTT. 

Assistant Professor of Social Studies, A.B., Appalachian State Teachers College; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
DON EDWIN ELLIS, 

Head of Plant Pathology and Professor of Plant Pathology, B.Sc, B.A., Central Col- 
lege; M.S., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
•GEORGE LELAND ELLIS, 

Instructor in Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
DONALD ALLEN EMERY, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin. 
CHARLES BENNETT ENGLAND, 

Research Instructor in Soils, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
NORMAN GILBERT ERIKSEN, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army, B.S., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute. 
JOHN LINCOLN ETCHELLS, 

Professor of Animal Industry, Botany and Horticulture (Coop. USD A), B.S., M.S., 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
HAROLD J. EVANS. 

Professor of Botany; B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
JAMES B. EVANS, 

Professor of Bacteriology, B.S., Houghton College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
JAMES PEEK EVERETT, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 

University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
RALPH EIGIL FADUM, 

Head of Department and Professor of Civil Engineering; B.S.C.E., University of Illi- 
nois; M.S.E., S.D., Harvard University. 
EMOL ATWOOD FAILS. 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.S., Southwestern Institute of Technology. Okla- 
homa; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College. 
DAVID IRVING FAIRBANKS. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering, B.S., E.E., Syracuse University; M.S., University 

of Buffalo. 
MAURICE HUGH FARRIER, 

Research Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., Iowa State College; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
WILLIAM THOMAS FIKE, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
ALVA LEROY FINKNER, 

Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., Colorado A. & M. College; M.S., Kan- 
sas State College: Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
WALTER LEE FISHEL. 

Instructor in Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., Purdue University. 
CHARLES PAGE FISHER. JR.. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, B.C.E., University of Virginia: S.M., Harvard Uni- 
versity. 
JAMES WALTER FITTS, 

Head of Department and Professor of Soils, B.S.. Nebraska State Teachers College; 

M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
WALTER CURTIS FITZGERALD, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.S., Wake Forest College; B.D., 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 
•JACK FLEISCHER. 

Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., University of Florida; M.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
HARRON O'BERRY FLOYD. JR.. 

Instructor in Physical Education, B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., University of North 

Carolina. 
HOMER CLIFTON FOLKS, 

Assistant Director of Instruction, School of Agriculture; Director of the North Carolina 

Agricultural Institute; Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., Oklahoma A. & M.; Ph.D.. 

Iowa State College. 
JULIAN MARK FORE. 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Purdue 

University. 



• On leave of absence 



334 Faculty 

charles irving foster, 

Professor of Social Studies. B.A., Princeton University; M.A., Harvard University. 
ALVIN MARCUS FOUNTAIN, 

Professor of English, B.E., M.S., North Carolina State College; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Peabody College. 
ANNA CLYDE FRAKER, 

Research Assistant in Engineering Research, B.S., Furman University. 
RAOUL MANUEL FREYRE, 

Assistant Professor in Physics, PhJ3., University of Havana, Cuba. 
DANIEL FROMM. 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
ARCHIE WAYLAND FUTRELL, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.M.E., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
GENE JOHN GALLETTA. 

Assistant Professor in Horticulture, B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Rutger3 Uni- 
versity. 
GERALD GARB, 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B.S., University of Pennsylvania, M.A., Ph.D., 

University of California. 
BERT HOWARD GARCIA, JR., 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Pennsylvania 

State University. 
MONROE EVANS GARDNER, 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
THOMAS HAROLD GARNER, 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Engineering B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
HENRY WILBUR GARREN, 

Head of Department and Professor of Poultry Science, A.B., University of North Car- 
olina: B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
MARTHA JOHNSON GARREN, 

Instructor in Mathematics, A.B., University of North Carolina. 
JOHN BERNARD GARTNER, 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Ohio State University; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State 

College. 
ROBERT THEODORE GAST, 

Research Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., 

Cornell University. 
PAUL ESCH GATTERDAM, 

Research Assistant Professor of Plant Chemistry (Field Crops), B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin. 
FRANK GEORGE GERLOCK, 

Instructor in Zooloov, B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Columbia University. 
EDMUND JOSEPH GERNT. 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, Certificate Rhode Island School of Design; Di- 
ploma, La Salle Extension University. 
DAN ULRICH GERSTEL, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California. 
WILLIAM BEST GILBERT, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., Berea College; M.S., University of Kentucky; 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
•GEORGE WALLACE GILES, 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., University of Nebraska; M.S., University 

of Missouri. 
ROBERT C. GILMORE, 

Superintendent Wood Products Laboratory, B.S., Pennsylvania State College. 
EDWARD WALKER GLAZENER, 

Director of Instruction, School of Agriculture, and Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., 

North Carolina State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
KARL BROWNING GLENN, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.E., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
THOMAS MARION GODBOLD, 

Instructor in Chemical Engineering, B.S., University of South Carolina. 
MARVIN RALPH GODFREY, 

Research Assistant of Field Crops (NCCIA), B.S., North Carolina State College. 
ALFRED JOHN GOETZE, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., E.E., Drexel Institute of Tech- 
nology; M.Sc, North Carolina State College. 
SAMUEL TURNER GOFORTH, JR., 

Instructor in Chemical Engineering, B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
GENNARO LOUIS GOGLIA. 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., University of Illinois; 

M.S.M.E., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
•RICHARD WEINBERG GOLDSMITH, 

Assistant Professor of Enolish, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
EUGENE FRIZZELLE GOLDSTON, 

Research Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S., North Carolina State College. 



• On leave of absence 



Faculty 335 

charles francis goldthwa1t, 

Visiting Professor of Textile Chemistry, B. S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
LEMUEL GOODE, 

Associate Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., West Virginia University Ph D 
University of Florida. 
ARNOLD HERBERT EDWARD GRANDAGE, 

Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.A., Lehigh University Ph D North 
Carolina State College. 
CLIFTON WILLINGTON GRAY, 

Assistant Professor of Psychology and Experimental Statistics, B.S., U. S Military 
Academy; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
JOHN HAYES GREGORY. 

Instructor in Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
WALTON CARLYLE GREGORY. 

William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Field Crops, B.A., Lynchburg College- 
M.A., Ph.D.. University of Virginia; D.Sc, Lynchburg College. 
HAZEL CORNELIA GRIFFIN. 

Special Lecturer in English, A.B., University of North Carolina; M.S., North Carolina 
State College. 
DANIEL SWARTWOOD GROSCH, 

Professor of Genetics, B.S., Moravian College; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 
•HARRY DOUGLASS GROSS, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S.. M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D.. Iowa State 
University. 
ELLIOT BROWN GROVER, 

Head of Department of Textile Technology, and Abel C. Linberger Professor of Yarn 
Processing, B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
RUTH BORDERS GUIN, 

Instructor of Textile Technology, B.S., Furman Universuy; M.S., Woman's College of 
the University of North Carolina. 
GEORGE ALBERT GULLETTE, 

Head of Department and Professor of Social Studies, A.B., Harvard University; M.A 
Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
ROY GUSSOW, 

Professor of Design, B.S. in Product Design, Institute of Design 
FRANK EDWIN GUTHRIE. 

Associate Professor of Entomology, B.S., University of Kentucky; M.S., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 
GEORGE RICHARD GWYNN, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 
Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
FRANK ARLING HAASIS. 

n ,„??/f, 88 ^ P,llnt Pathology, B.S.. University of California; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
WILLIAM CULLEN HACKLER, 

Associate Professor of Ceramic Engineering, B. Cer. E., M.S. Cer. E„ Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
ROBERT JOHN HADER. 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., University of Chicago; Ph.D., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
FREDERICK MORGAN HAIG. 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., University of Maryland; M.S.. North Carolina State 
College. 
JOHN LOVELL HALL, 

Instructor in Plant Chemistry (Field Crops), B.S., North Carolina State College; M.A., 
University of North Carolina. 
RUTH BADGER HALL, 

Assistant Professor of Modem Languages, B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina. 
ERNEST MILTON HALLIDAY, 

Professor of Social Studies, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
MAX HALPEREN, 

Assistant Professor of English, B.S., City College of New York; M.A.. Florida State 
University; Ph.D., Florida State University. 
DAME SCOTT HAMBY. 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
CHARLES HORACE HAMILTON. 

Professor of Rural Sociology, B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.S.. A. & M. Col- 
lege of Texas: Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
ROBERT HILLERY HAMILTON, 

Wilham Neal Reynolds Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., University 
of Illinois; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
ALICE ELIZABETH HAMMOND. 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, A.B., University of Mississippi; M.A., Peabody 
College for Teachers. 
DURWIN M. HANSON. 

Professor of Industrial Education, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
KARL P. HANSON, 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S.. University 
of Michigan. 



• On leave of absence 



336 Faculty 

james walker hardin, 

Assistant Professor of Botany, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.S., University of Ten- 
nessee; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
HARRY ALLEN HARGRAVE, 

Instructor in English, B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt University. 
REINARD HARKEMA, 

Professor of Zoology, A.B., Calvin College; Ph.D., Duke University. 
SADIE JENKINS HARMON, 

Assistant Professor of English, A.B., B.M., Greensboro College; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina. 
CLEON HARRELL. 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.S., M.A., University of Virginia. 
GEORGE OLIVER HARRELL, 

Instructor in Ceramic Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
WALTER JOEL HARRINGTON, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University. 
♦EDGAR LEE HARRISBERGER, 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., University of Oklahoma; 

M.S.M.E., University of Colorado. 
CLARENCE A. HART, 

Assistant Professor of Wood Technology, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
LODWICK CHARLES HARTLEY, 

Head of Department and Professor of English, B.A., Furman University; M.A., Colum- 
bia University; Ph.D., Princeton University; Litt.D. (Hon.), Furman University. 
PAUL HENRY HARVEY, 

Head of Department and William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Field 

Crops, B.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
FRANCES JEFFERSON HASSLER, 

Head of Department and William Neal Reynolds Professor of Agricultural Engineering, 

B.S., University of Missouri; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
WILLIAM WALTON HASSLER, 

Associate Professor of Zoology, B.S., M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of 

Tennessee. 
ARTHUR COURTNEY HAYES, 

Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry, M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

Brown University. 
FRANK LLOYD HAYNES, JR., 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity. 
TEDDY THEODORE HEBERT. 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Southwestern Louisiana Institute; M.S., Louisiana 

State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
JOSEPH LEON HELGUERA, 

Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Mexico City College; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
WARREN ROBERT HENDERSON, 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture, B.S., University of New Hampshire; M.A.. Harvard 

University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
WILLIAM ROBERT HENDLEY, 

Instructor in Economics, B.A., Yale University. 
WILLIAM RAY HENRY, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
WILEY HICKS HENSON, JR., 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., 

North Carolina State College. 
JOHN HERTZMAN, 

Assistant Professor of Design; B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology. 
FRANCIS EUGENE HESTER, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Auburn 

University. 
ROY SCOTT HICKMAN, 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., Ph.D., University of California, 

Berkeley. 
WILLIAM NORWOOD HICKS, 

Head of Department and Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.E., M.S., North 

Carolina State College: B.A., Duke University; M.A., Oberlin College. 
WILLIAM LAWRENCE HIGHFILL, 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.A., Wake Forest College; B.D., South- 
ern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University. 
•CHARLES HORACE HILL, 

Professor of Poultry Science, B. S., Colorado State University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 
THOMAS IRA HINES, 

Head of Department and Professor of Recreation and Park Administration, B.S., North 

Carolina State College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 
JUAN EDWARDO HISADA, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., North Carolina State College. 



On leave of absence 



Faculty 337 

robert g. hitchings, 

Associate Professor of Pulp and Paper Technology, B.S., New York State College of 

Forestry; M.F., Duke University. 
GEORGE BURNHAM HOADLEY, 

Head of Department and Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Swarthmore College; 

M.Sc, D.Sc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
ARTHUR MABON HOCH, 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, B.S., Wake Forest College; M.Ed.. Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
CHARLES SASNETTE HODGES, 

Research Assistant Professor of Forest and Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., University of 

Idaho; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
FORNEY MOORE HOKE, JR., 

Research Engineer of Engineering Research, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
ABRAHAM HOLTZMAN, 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, B.S., M.A., University of Cali- 
fornia at Los Angeles; Ph.D., Harvard University. 
DALE MAX HOOVER, 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., Iowa State College, Ph.D., 

University of Chicago. 
MAURICE W. HOOVER, 

Associate Professor of Horticulture, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 
RUTH B. HONEYCUTT, 

Instructor in Mathematics, A.B., Wellesley College; M.A.. Duke University. 
JOHN WILLIAM HORN, 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering; B.S.C.E.. West Virginia University; M.S.C.E., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
IVAN HOSTETLER, 

Head of Department and Professor of Industrial Arts, B.A., Bluffton College; M.A., 

Ohio State University; Ed.D., University of Missouri. 
EZRA LEWIS HOWELL, 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
MORADA ALICE HUNT, 

Lecturer in Economics, A.B., University of North Carolina; LL.B., University of North 

Carolina Law School. 
CARLTON ESTILOW HUNTER. 

Instructor in Industrial Engineering, B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
GEORGE HYATT, JR., 

Head of Department and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Michigan State College; 

M.S., Rutgers University. 
LOREN ALBERT IHNEN, 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., 

Iowa State College. 
WILLIAM PRENTISS INGRAM, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
RASOUL MAHMOOD ISTRABADI, 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, B.S.C.E., Baghdad Engineering School, M.S.C.E., 

Louisiana State University. 
WILLIAM ADDISON JACKSON, 

Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
•GERALD BLAINE JAMES, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 

Ed.D., University of Illinois. 
HERMAN BROOKS JAMES, 

Dean of the School of Agriculture and Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., 

North Carolina State College: Ph.D., Duke University. 
JOHN MITCHELL JENKINS, JR., 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Clemson Agricultural College; M.S., Louisiana State 

University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
JOSEPH WILLIAM JENKINS, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Major, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, B.A., 

Mercer University. 
HARLEY YOUNG JENNINGS, 

Research Professor of Textile Chemistry, B.S., Adrian College; M.S., Ph.D., University 

of Michigan. 
CHIA REN JIN, 

Research Assistant of Textile Chemistry, B.S., National Taiwan University; B.S., Auburn 

University; M.S., North Carolina State College. 
E. SIGURD JOHNSON, 

Professor of Furniture Manufacturing and Management, B.S., Syracuse University; M.F., 

Duke University. 
ELMER HUBERT JOHNSON, 

Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin. 
JOSEPH CLYDE JOHNSON, 

Associate Professor of Psychology, B.S., State Teachers College (Troy, Ala.); M.A., 

Ed.D., Peabody College. 



* On leave of absence 



338 Faculty 

william hugh johnson, 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
WILLIAM RODGERS JOHNSTON, 

Instructor of Chemistry, B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina. 
GUY LANGSTON JONES, 

Associate Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota. 
IVAN DUNLAVY JONES, 

Professor of Horticulture, A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota. 
KENNETH ALLEN JORDAN, 

Assistant Professor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 
WILLIAM HAROLD JUSTICE, 

Instructor of Animal Industry, D.V.M., University of Georgia. 
CHARLES HOWARD KAHN, 

Associate Professor of Architecture, A.B. Math., University of North Carolina; B. Arch., 

B.C.E., North Carolina State College; M.S. Struc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
HENRY LEVEKE KAMPHOEFNER, 

Dean of the School of Design and Professor of Architecture, B.S., Architecture, Univer- 
sity of Illinois; M.S. Arch., Columbia University. 
EUGENE JOHN KAMPRATH, 

Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 
HAROLD KEATING, 

Associate Professor of Physical Education, B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College. 
THERESE MARIE KELLEHER, 

Assistant Professor of Genetics, B.S., Iowa State College; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 
KENNETH RAYMOND KELLER, 

Assistant Director of Research in Charge of Tobaceo, and Professor of Field Crops, 

B.S., South Dakota University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
JOSEPH WHEELER KELLY, 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

Iowa State College. 
ARTHUR KELMAN, 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Rhode Island State College; M.S., Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College. 
PETER JAMES KENDELL, 

Assistant Statistician of Experimental Statistics, B.Sc, The London School of Economics. 
JOHN FAWCETT KENFIELD, JR., 

Associate Professor of Physical Education, B.A., M.A. University of North Carolina. 
JOE MASON KENYON, JR., 

Research Assistant of Field Crops, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
HOWARD CARL HENRY KERNKAMP, 

Professor of Animal Industry, D.V.M., Ohio State University; M.S., Iowa State 

University. 
HENDERSON GRADY KINCHELOE, 

Professor of English, B.A., University of Richmond; M.A. Harvard University; Ph.D., 

Duke University. 
JAMES A. KING, 

Research Instructor of Textile Technology, B.S., Clemson College. 
RICHARD ADAMS KING. 

M. G. Mann Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., University of Connecticut; M.S., 

University of California; M.P.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
ROSA DEANS KIRBY, 

Research Instructor of Textile Chemistry, B.A., Meredith College. 
ELMO RONALD KIRKLAND, 

Instructor in Physics, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.S., University of Miami. 
JAMES BRYANT KIRKLAND, 

Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., Agri., 

M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
JAMES WARREN KLIBBE, 

Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
DAVID MCKENDREE KLINE, 

Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology, A.B., M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin. 
GLENN CHARLES KLINGMAN, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., University of Nebraska; M.S., Kansas State University; 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
HERBERT ALLAN KNAPPENBERGER, 

Instructor in Industrial Engineering, B.S., M.S. I.E., Pennsylvania State University. 
RICHARD BENNETT KNIGHT, 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., University 

of Illinois. 
ALBERT SIDNEY KNOWLES, JR., 

Assistant Professor of English, B.A., M.A., University of Virginia. 
KEN-ICHI KOJIMA, 

Assistant Professor of Genetics, Kyoto University, Japan; Ph.D., North Carolina Stat* 

College. 



Faculty 339 

charles frederick kolb. 

Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Drury College; M.A 

University of Kentucky. 
BENJAMIN GRANADE KOONCE, JR., 

Assistant Professor of English, A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina- Ph D 

Princeton University. 
MAX A. KOONTZ, 

Instrumentation Supervisor, Nuclear Reactor Project, B.S., North Carolina State College 

JOHN CLEMENT KOOP, " 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics, B. S., Universitv College- 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
INGEBORG KOOPMAN 

Research Assistant of Engineering Research. Newsprochliches Madchengymnasium 

Germany; Max Planck-Institut fur Metallforschung, Germany. 
THOMAS RHINEHART KONSLER. 

Research Instructor of Horticulture, B.S., University of Kentucky; M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
ROBERT RAY KORFHAGE, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S.E., M.S., University of Michigan 
WILLIAM WURTH KRIEGEL, ".uisan. 

Professor of Ceramic Engineering, B.S.C.E., B.S. Cer.E., University of Washington; 
TA-uTv 'DA^ tana School of Mines; Dr. Ing., Technische Hochschule, Hanover, Germany. 
JAMIE PARKER LAMB, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B. S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute- 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
JOHN RALPH LAMBERT, JR., 

Professor of Social Studies, A.B., Western Maryland College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

University. 
•JOE OSCAR LAMMI, 

Professor of Forest Economics, B.S., M.S., Oregon State College; Ph.D., University of 

California. 
HAROLD AUGUSTUS LAMONDS, 

Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN HAROLD LAMPE, 

Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., M.S 

Dr. Engr., Johns Hopkins University. 
FORREST WESLEY LANCASTER, 

^ Tlr ^ r °4 e 4 8< ^ ?^£tK?t ca ' BS - ChE - M - S - Purdue University; Ph.D., Duke University. 
C11.E.0 1 JiirC o. LiANDES, 

Assistant Professor of Pulp and Paper Technology, B.S., Ch.E., Ohio State University. 
CAROLE SHAPIRO LASHINSKY, 

Instructor of Chemistry, B.A., Western Reserve Universitv. 
LOUIE THOMAS LASSITER, 

Instructor in Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JAMES GIACOMO LECCE, 

Associate Professor of Animal Industry, B.A., Dartmouth College; M.S., Pennsylvania 

State College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
GUY RECTOR LEDBETTER, 

Research Assistant of Field Crops, B.S., North Carolina State College 
THOMAS BENSON LEDBETTER, 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.M.E., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
JOSHUA ALEXANDER LEE, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops, A.B., San Diego State College- Ph D 

University of California. 
RICHARD SHAO-LIN LEE, 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., National Taiwan University 

M.S.M.E., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Harvard University. 
SUNG WON LEE, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., Alabama Polvtechnic Institute- M S 

North Carolina State College. 
JAMES EDWARD LEGATES, 

Head of Animal Breeding Section and William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor 

of Animal Industry, B.S., University of Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College 
WILLIAM RUSSELL LEONHARDT, ^ 

Assistant Professor in Physical Education, B.S., Springfield College; M.S., University 

of Illinois. 
PAUL BONAR LEONARD, 

Associate Professor of Engineering Graphics, B.S., Ohio State Universitv; M.A. Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
JACK LEVINE, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., University of California; Ph.D., Princeton University. 
CHARLES FREDERICK LEWIS, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Tennessee State College; M.A., Peabody 

College. 
JOHN GARY LEWIS, 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 



* On leave of absence 



340 Faculty 

william mason lewis, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops. B.S., A. & M. College of Texas; M.S., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 
PUN-DUEN (PETER) LI, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOEL KARL LINDBERG, 

Visiting Professor of Textile Research, B.S., Licentiate, Ph.D., Chalmers University of 

Technology. 
QUENTIN W. LINDSEY, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.A., University of Nebraska; 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
CHARLES HOWIE LITTLE, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Davidson College; M.A., University of North 

Carolina. 
JAMES HENRY LITTLE, IV, 

Assistant Professor in Physical Education, B.E., Central Michigan College; M.A., 

University of Michigan. 
CHARLES DWAINE LIVENGOOD, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
ROBERT WARREN LLEWELLYN, 

Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S.E.E., Union College; M.S.I.E., Purdue Univer- 
sity. 
RICHARD HENRY LOEPPERT, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota. 
CHARLES KLEM LOMBARD, 

Instructor in Physics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
GEORGE GILBERT LONG, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B. A., Indiana University; M.S., North Carolina State 

College; Ph.D., University of Florida. 
KENDALL GRAHAM LORCH, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, B.S., Florida State University. 
ROY LEE LOVVORN, 

Director of Research for the School of Agriculture and Professor of Field Crops, B.S., 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute: M.S., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin. 
GEORGE BLANCHARD LUCAS, 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Pennsylvania State College; M.S., Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University. 
HENRY LAWRENCE LUCAS, JR., 

William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., Uni- 
versity of California; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
ARTHUR EDWARD LUCIER, 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.Cer.E., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
JAMES FULTON LUTZ, 

Professor of Soils, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Mis- 
souri. 
JOSEPH THOMAS LYNN, 

Graduate Administrator and Associate Professor of Physics, B.A., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity; M.S., Ohio State University. 
CLARK CHARLES MACOMBER, 

Assistant Professor of Product Design, B.S., in Product Design, Illinois Institute of 

Technology. 
JOHN A. MACON, 

Chemical Engineer, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JAMES GRAY MADDOX, 

Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., University of Arkansas; M.S., University of 

Wisconsin; M.P.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
PRANAB K. MAITRA, 

Research Assistant in Engineering Research, B.S., University of Calcutta; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Utah. 
T. EWALD MAKI, 

Carl Alwin Schenck Distinguished Professor of Forest Management, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota. 
ARMSTRONG MALTBIE, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., University of Vermont. 
CARROLL LAMB MANN, JR., 

Professor of Civil Engineering; B.S.C.E., North Carolina State College; C. E., Princeton 

University. 
THURSTON JEFFERSON MANN, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
EDWARD GEORGE MANNING, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S.E.E., Lehigh University; M.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
ELIZABETH HINES MANNING, 

Instructor of Chemistry, A. B., Woman's College, University of North Carolina. 
HENRY VANCE MARSHALL, JR., 

Research Assistant of Botany and Bacteriology, B.S., North Carolina State College. 



Faculty 341 

roger powell marshall. 

Professor of English, B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Columbia University; M.S., 

North Carolina State College. 
CARTER WILLIAMS MARTIN, 

Instructor in English, A.B., Presbyterian College; M.A., Vanderbilt University. 
DAVID HAMILTON MARTIN. 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S., Presbyterian College, South Carolina; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 
DONALD CROWELL MARTIN, 

Instructor in Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina. 
GRADY ALLEN MARTIN. 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., 

Purdue University. 
WILLIAM ROYAL MARTIN, JR., 

Research Associate of Textile Research, A.B., University of North Carolina; B.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
DAVID DICKENSON MASON, 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.A., King College; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
GENNARD MATRONE. 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 
GEORGE MATSUMOTO, 

Professor of Architecture, B.A., Washington University; M.A., Cranbrook Academy of 

Art. 
DALE FREDERICK MATZINGER, 

Associate Professor of Genetics, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
ROBERT EDWARD MAY, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JACKSON RAMSAUR MAUNEY, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin. 
SELZ CABOT MAYO, 

Head of Department and Professor of Rural Sociology, A.B., Atlantic Christian College; 

M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
GLENN CROCKER McCANN, 

Associate Professor of Rural Sociology, B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., 

Washington State College. 
CHARLES BERNARD McCANTS, 

Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Iowa 

State College. 
WILLIAM FRED McCLURE, 

Research Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., Clemson Agricultural College. 
ROBERT EDMUND McCOLLUM, 

Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University 

of Illinois. 
RALPH JOSEPH McCRACKEN, 

Associate Professor of Soils, A.B. Earlham College; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., 

Iowa State College. 
CHARLES RUSSELL McCULLOUGH, 

Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., Purdue University. 
W. T. McDANIEL, 

Chief Engineer, B.S., University of North Carolina. 
PATRICK HILL McDONALD, JR., 

Head of Department and Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S. Engr., North Caro- 
lina State College, M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
ROBERT LEE McELWEE, 

Liaison Geneticist, B.S.F., West Virginia University. 
LAWRENCE B. McGEE, 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.Chem.E., North Carolina State College. 
DONALD JOSEPH McGURK, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Major, Quartermaster Corps, U. S. Army, B.S., 

Villanova College. 
ANGUS KEITH FERGUSON McKEAN, 

Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Williams College; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan. 
ROBERT ARCHIBALD MacKERRACHER, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Graduate, U. S. Naval Academy; M.A., University 

of Virginia. 
CHARLES ISAAC McLAIN, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Captain, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, B.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
FOIL WILLIAM McLAUGHLIN, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops and Assistant Director of North Carolina Crop Im- 
provement Association, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN JOSEPH McNEILL, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
FRANCIS EDWARD McVAY, 

Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., Rhode Island State College; M.S., 

North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 



342 Faculty 

jefferson sullivan meares, 

Professor of Physics, B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
ADOLF MEHLICH, 

Research Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
ARTHUR CLAYTON MENIUS, JR., 

Dean of the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics and Professor of 

Physics, B.A., Catawba College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
LAUREN WHITFORD MERRIAM, 

Professor of Military Science, Colonel, Infantry, U. S. Army, B.S., U. S. Military 

Academy; Command and General Staff College; Armed Forces Staff College; Ecole 

Superieure de Guerre (France). 
LAWRENCE EUGENE METTLER, 

Assistant Professor of Genetics, A.B., Miami University; M.S., University of Kentucky; 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
ROBERT S. METZGER, 

Assistant Professor of Social Studies, A.B., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., 

Columbia University. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON MIDDLETON, 

Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S., M.E. Math., North Carolina State 

College. 
GORDON KENNEDY MIDDLETON, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
HENRY MOORE MIDDLETON, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOSEPH LEONARD MIDDLETON, 

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.A., Wake Forest College; B.D., Crozer 

Theological Seminary; M.A., Columbia University. 
CONRAD HENRY MILLER, 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture, B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., 

Michigan State College. 
EDWIN LAWRENCE MILLER, JR., 

Associate Professor of Geological Engineering, B.S., E.M., Missouri School of Mines and 

Metallurgy; M.S., North Carolina State College. 
EMMETT HART MILLER, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, B.S., University of Maryland. 
GROVER CLEVELAND MILLER, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, A.B., Berea College; M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University. 
HOWARD GEORGE MILLER, 

Head of Department and Professor of Psychology, B.S., New York State College for 

Teachers; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
LATHAM L. MILLER, 

Associate Professor of Recreation and Park Administration, B.A., Wake Forest College; 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 
PHILIP ARTHUR MILLER, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
TEXTON ROBERT MILLER, 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., M.A., Michigan State University; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
WILLIAM DYKSTRA MILLER, 

Associate Professor of Silviculture, B.A., Reed College; M.F., Ph.D., Yale University. 
WILLIAM TERRELL MILLS, 

Assistant Professor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
WALTER JOSEPH MISTRIC, JR., 

Associate Professor of Entomology, B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., Ph.D., 

A. & M. College of Texas. 
ADOLPHUS MITCHELL, 

Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., University of North Carolina. 
THEODORE BERTIS MITCHELL, 

Professor of Entomology, B.S., Massachusetts State College; M.S., North Carolina State 

College; D.S., Harvard University. 
RICHARD DOUGLAS MOCHRIE, 

Assistant Professor in Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
CARL ALBERT MOELLER, 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts, B. A., Michigan State University; M.Ed., Wayne 

State University. 
ROY B. MOFFITT, 

Research Assistant in Engineering Research, B. Geol. E., B.Cer.E., North Carolina State 

College. 
ROBERT HARRY MOLL, 

Assistant Professor of Genetics, B.S., Cornell University; M.S., University of Idaho; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
DANIEL JAMES MONCOL, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; D. V. M., 

University of Georgia. 
ROBERT JAMES MONROE, 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., Iowa State College; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 



Faculty 343 

ERMER LEON MOORE, 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S.A., University of Georgia: Ph.D.. University 
of Wisconsin. 
FRANK HARPER MOORE. 

Assistant Professor of English, A.B., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina. 
JAMES LEGRAND MOORE. 

Research Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S.Ch.. Hampden-Sydney College- 
B.S., M.S.. North Carolina State College. 
HARRY BALLARD MOORE, JR., 

Instructor of Entomology, B.S., East Carolina College; M.S., Purdue University. 
ROBERT PARKER MOORE, 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., Oklahoma State University: M.S.. Iowa State University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
CHARLES GALLOWAY MOREHEAD. 

Associate Professor of Education, A.B., Hendrix College; M.A., Duke University, M.Ed., 
D.Ed., University of Kansas. 
DONALD EDWIN MORELAND. 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.D., Ph.D., North Carolina State 
College. 
JOHN WESLEY MORGAN, 

Instructor of Chemistry, A.B., M.A., Duke University. 
WILLIAM EDWIN MOSER, 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
MARVIN KENT MOSS. 

Research Assistant of Engineering Research, A.B., Elon College; M.S., North Carolina 
State College. 
ALFRED LEROY MOWERY. JR., 

Research Assistant of Engineering Research, B.S., Duke University; M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
CAREY GARDNER MUMFORD. 

Assistant to the Dean of the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics and 
Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 
W. RAY MURLEY. 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
CHARLES FRANKLIN MURPHY, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., Purdue University. 
FRANK J. MURRAY, 

Assistant Professor in Physical Education, A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
RAYMOND LEROY MURRAY, 

Head of Department and Professor of Physics, B.S., M.A., University of Nebraska; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
RICHARD MONIER MYERS. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State College. 
HOWARD M. NIHIKLAN, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
RICHARD ROBERT NELSON, 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.A., Augsburg College; M.S., Ph.D.. University 
of Minnesota. 
HERBERT HENRY NEUNZIG, 

Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University. 
SLATER EDMUND NEWMAN, 

Associate Professor of Psychology, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Boston Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
LOWELL WENDELL NIELSEN, 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S.. M.S.. Utah State Agricultural College: Ph.D.. 
Cornell L T niversity. 
DAVID EUGENE NIXON. 

Instructor of Mathematics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College 
STUART McGUIRE NOBLIN, 

Professor of History and Political Science and Archivist of the College, A.B., Davidson 
College: A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
ARNOLD NOLSTAD, 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Luther College: M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh. 
CHARLES JOSEPH NUSBAUM, 

Professor and William Seal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., 
Oregon State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
JIMMY R. OGBURN, 

Research Engineer, B.S., Texas Technological College. 
GEORGE MOTLEY OLIVER, 

Iiistructor in Chemistry, A.B., M.S., University of North Carolina. 
BERNARD MARTIN OLSEN. 

Associate Professor of Economics, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
OLIVER HAMILTON ORR, JR., 

Instructor in History and Political Science, A.B., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
•JOHN CLARK OSBORNE. 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute: M.S., University of 
Maine; D.V.M., Michigan State College. 



• On leave of absence 



344 Faculty 

hassan a. n. oteifa, 

Research Assistant of Textile Research, B.S., Alexandria University; M.S. in E.E., M.S. 

in Text., North Carolina State College. 
WALTER SCOTT OVERTON, 

Assistant Statistician of Experimental Statistics, B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute. 
EDWIN HUGH PAGET, 

Associate Professor of English, B.L., Northwestern University; M.A., University of 

Pittsburgh. 
HAYNE PALMOUR, III, 

Research Engineer, B.Cer.E., M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
CHI-HSUN (PETER) PAN, 

Assistant Professor of Textile Research, B.S., Chiao Tung University; B.S., North Caro- 
lina State College; M.S., University of Michigan. 
JAMES EDWARD PARDUE. 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
HUBERT VERN PARK, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Lenoir-Ryne College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina. 
THOMAS HARDIE PARK, 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B.A., Vanderbilt University. 
JOHN MASON PARKER, III, 

Professor of Geological Engineering, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University. 
CARLOTTA PETERSON PATTON, 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.S., College of Charleston. 
ROBERT COPELAND PAUL, 

Professor of Air Science, B.S., Georgia School of Technology. 
THOMAS OLIVER PERRY, 

Associate Professor of Forest Genetics, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
LEE HOMER PERSON, 

Research Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Mississippi State College; M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
DANIEL McLEOD PETERSON, 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., Duke Uni- 
versity. 
WALTER JOHN PETERSON, 

William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, B.S., M.S., Michigan State 

College; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 
WILBUR CARROLL PETERSON, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S.E.E., University of Minnesota; M.S., 

Michigan State University, Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
HOWARD ALDRIDGE PETREA, 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Guilford College; M.A., University of North 

Carolina. 
GENE HAROLD PHILLIPS, 

Instructor in Engineering Graphics, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
LYLE LLEWELLYN PHILLIPS, 

Associate Professor of Field Crops, B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., Claremont Col- 
lege; Ph.D., University of Washington. 
WALTER HENRY PIERCE, 

Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota. 
JAMES RODNEY PILAND, 

Research Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., Wake Forest College; M.S., North Carolina 

State College. 
NEWBORN EARL PILAND, 

Instructor in Economics, B.A., University of North Carolina. 
ROBERT McLEAN PINKERTON, 

Professor of Aeronautical Engineering, B.S., Bradley University. 
GEORGE WAVERLY POLAND, 

Head of Department and Professor of Modern Languages, B.A., College of William and 

Mary; M.A., Brown University; Diploma, Universidad of Salamanca; Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina. 
DANIEL TOWNSEND POPE, 

Associate Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Clemson College; M.S., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
JACK PORTER, 

Instructor in English, A.B., George Peabody College for Teachers; M.A., University of 

North Carolina. 
JOSEPH ALEXANDER PORTER, JR., 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
LAURENCE ERNEST POTEAT, 

Instructor in Metallurgical Engineering, B.M.E., North Carolina State College; M.S., 

Stanford University. 
NATHANIEL THOMAS POWELL, 

Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.Sc, Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
RICHARD JOSEPH PRESTON, 

Dean of the School of Forestry and Professor of Forestry, B.A., M.S.F., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 
CHARLES HARRY PROCTOR, 

Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan Stat« 

University. 



Faculty 345 

thomas lavelle quay. 

CoIleKe 8 ^ ° f Zoo! ° 9y ' B,S " Universitv of Arkansas; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 
ROBERT LAMAR RABB, 

HAR^rDlRC^AMSEY^"' 07 " ' ^' B ' S - "^ PhD - "^ Car ° Hna State Colle * e - 
Associate Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Kansas State College; M S., Ph D North 
Carolina State College. l " 

GLENN ORVICE RANDALL, 

. WILfflS^STON^NSlS' 8 -- UniVerS5ty ° f Arkan?aS: M - S - l0Wa StatS C0Ueffe - 
J0HNTREVRA^!N P G r S° /eS80r 0/ ** BS " M " S " N ° rth CaroUM State Allege. 

po" t SA^S^ ai stai ' st ' cs ' B - s - "- UniversU ' of Nebraska ; 

HORACE DARR RAWLS, 

College 1 ' 6 Pr0fe8s0r of Sociol °9V «»<* Ant/tropo/offy, B.S., M.S.. North Carolina State 

ROBERT MALCOM RAY, 

IMMO 6 H ar REDEKER 0r ° f Aaricultuml Economics, B.S., North Carolina State College. 

t ° re J? r f ss ' n 9 Engineer of the Minerals Research Lab, Professional Degree, University 
for Mining and Metallurgy; M.S., Columbia University ' unlversit y 

ROBERT BURNETT REDFERN. 

Garotaa* State CoBe °J Animal Indu8tr V' BS - Clemson College; M.S., Ph.D., North 

JOE WILSON REECE, 

EDWIN r MccluER'REID:' M3 Mechanic *' B " S - North Carolina State College. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Major. Artillery, U. S. Army BA Presby- 
terian College. "..tx.i xicsuy 
ELBERT REID. 

PRESTON HARDING r REiDr' C "'' M ^ Inf0rmatio »- BS " M A - &«*««• State University. 
StetfcSl2e! /MTOr 0/ S078 ' B ' S " Colorado A - & M - College; M.S., Ph.D. North Carolina 
WILLIS ALTON' REID, 

ladSaTfrInc^r^tzeI; Wake Forest Collese: Ph " D - University of Wisconsin - 

1 nstenf Pro/e«sor of History and Political Science, LL.B., Budapest, Hungary; PhD 
CWcaifo InStltUte 0f Inter «»tional Studies, Geneva, Switzerland; PhJ>., University of 
JOHN THOMAS REVELL, 

jAttllraoiiif rice? Textile Research ' B - s - North CaroIina state CoIlege - 

Kna'state Collet Technology ' B ' S - Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.S., North Caro- 
JOHN CARL RICE,' 

R r s /C M% 0/ a F k W Cr T^ ? an d Director of North Carolina Crop Improvement Association, 
FRA B NCES M tARVA b N rn RICHTR'D's y ON PhD -' MiSSiSSlPPi StatG U " iVerSity - 

Unfversity > orc7ncinnIti reSS ° r ° f En ° ineerina ^search, B.S., Roanoke College; M.S., 
JACKSON ASHCRAFT RIGNEY, 

cS&ZuT'l™:^ Col£r r ° f Experimmtal ^tics, BA. New Mexico State 
FRANKLIN LEWIS ROBERTS, 

JOHN S KERR RoIeRtI' Jfr Univ "»«* ° f MainC; M " S " Un!versitJ ' of Canterbury. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science, Lieutenant Colonel, Infantry, U. S. Army BS 
U. S. Military Academy. ""' °-°-t 

WILLIAM MILNER ROBERTS 

"■??'f D £ ir,J AIa " v factoring Section and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S.A., Univer- 

COW& COOK nt Rb S BTN?6 S N. ***- "*"*» ° f MinneS ° ta - 

S3t?5dS5r9ifeJtSa ster,in * Col,ege - Kansas: MA - Univeisitj ' o£ Kansas: 

HAROLD FRANK ROBINSON, 

Kl^li^T/ and Professor of Genetics and Experimental Statistics, B.S.. M.S., 
MEnSel LE r NO n ROBINS C N: g j : R Ph - D ' ^^^ UniVer3 ' ty - 

odi^wayne^obTson.^" "''' B - S - North Caro,ina state Co,!e * e - 

sfcTof Wi8coSin° r 0/ ^^ /ndMS ' rj '' BS < Oklahoma A. & M.; M.S.. Ph.D.. Univer- 
JOHN PAUL ROSS, ' 

CornelF UnfrSSy! Pr ° U8S0T ° f Plant P^hology. B.S.. University of Vermont; Ph.D., 
CHARLES WITSELL'ROWAN, 

CLAUD^US P SEi e L R0t^ SC ' enCC ' **■ ^^ ° f Ge ° rgia - 
Assistant Professor of Air Science, A.B., East Carolina College. 



346 Faculty 

donald jacob rulfs, 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., Harvard 

University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
PAUL JAMES RUST, 

Associate Professor of Psychology, B.A., M.A., University of Idaho; Ph.D., University 

of Washington. 
HENRY AMES RUTHERFORD, 

Head of Department of Textile Chemistry, Professor of Textile Chemistry, and Director 

of Chemical Research, Department of Textile Research; B.S., Davis and Elkins College; 

M.A., George Washington University. 
JOHN ANTHONY SANTOLUCITO, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, A.B., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of California at Davis. 
JOSEPH NEAL SASSER, 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College, Ph.D., 

University of Maryland. 
GEORGE HOWARD SATTERFIELD, 

Professor of Chemistry, A.B., M.A., Duke University; B.S., North Carolina State College. 
KARL SAX, 

Visiting Professor of Forest Genetics, B.S., Washington State College; M.S., Sc.D., 

Harvard University. 
CLARENCE CAYCE SCARBOROUGH, 

Head of the Department and Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., M.S., Alabama 

Polytechnic Institute; Ed.M., Ed.D., University of Illinois. 
JOACHIM-DIETRICH SCHOBEL 

Visiting Research Associate of Engineering Research, Diploma-Ing., Technische Hoch- 

schule Aachen; Dr. Ing., Technesche Hochschulle Stuttgart. 
EDWARD MARTIN SCHOENBORN, JR., 

Head of Department and Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D., 

Ohio State University. 
HERBERT TEMPLE SCOFIELD, 

Head of Botany and Bacteriology Department and Professor of Botany, A.B., Ph.D., 

Cornell University. 
ROBERT JOHNSON SCHRAMM, JR.. 

Research Assistant Professor in Horticulture, A.B., Hiram College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

University. 
JAMES ARTHUR SEAGRAVES, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.A., Reed College; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa 

State College. 
WAYLAND PRITCHARD SEAGRAVES, 

Adjunct Professor in Electrical Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
LOUIS WALTER SEEGERS, 

Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Muhlenberg College; A.M., University 

of Pennsylvania. 
JOHN FRANK SEELY, 

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
HEINZ SELTMANN, 

Assistant Professor of Botany; B.A., Drew University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
JOHN IKE SEWELL, 

Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
PETER SHAHDAN, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Ph.B., Brown University; M.S., North Carolina 

State College. 
HENRY ANTHONY SHANNON, 

Assistant Professor of Science Education, B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College; 

Ed.M., University of Missouri. 
ARCHIE WARD SHAW, 

Research Assistant of Field Crops, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
GRAYE JOHNSON SHAW, 

Instructor in Chemistry, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN PRESTON SHAW, 

Assistant Professor of Architecture, B. Arch., University of Texas; M. Arch., Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 
LUTHER SHAW, 

Research Associate Professor of Field Crops, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.S., 

University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
BRIAN SHAWCROFT, 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture, Dipl. Arch., Southwest Essex Technical 

College and School of Art, London; M. Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
WILFRED MICHAEL SHEA, 

Instructor of Physical Education, B.S., North Carolina State College; M.E., University 

of North Carolina. 
JAMES EDWARD SHELTON, 

Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 
ALFRED BERNARD ROWLAND SHELLEY, 

Associate Professor of English, B.S., Tufts College; M.A., Harvard University. 
CHING-SHENG SHEN, 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B. A., Yenching University; M.A., Boston University; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
ROBERT TINSLEY SHERWOOD, 

Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 



Faculty 



347 



WILLIAM EDWARD SHINN, 

Head of Department of Knitting Technology and Chester H. Roth Professor of Knlttinn 

zo&^idP&gJF^ BS - MS - North Carolina sta - 23fc 

ROBERT °WOR^SVHOFFN / E C R 80r °' ^^ ^ PhJ> " SUte Univer8ity of Io - 

DARlEfL'RHETTHREvI? "^"^ Exten * i(m ServiCe ' BS ' North CaroIina Sta ** College. 
In-Charge Computing Laboratory and Associate Professor of Mathematics R A TTni 
versity of Tulsa: M.S.. Oklahoma A. & M. College- PhD Univer^frT nf niiw 

CLARENCE BONNER SHULENBERGER ^ oue ^ e - *"■•»•. Lm%ers>t> of Ul.nois. 

RIChI^Ee'sIMMO^S? "^ ROaD ° ke ^^ "^ C ° 1Umbia University. 

PhTunive^ftnf °Lti^ tUTal *~^ BS ' MS - Kansas State University; 
SOFUS EMMEL SIMONSEN. 

Denmtrk. r "' ^^^ Lan ° Uages - Abitur Ronde - Denmark; Certificate Arhus Seminarium, 
WILLIAM HUGHES SIMPSON. 

P/*cemene Director in Engineering, B.S.. Wake Forest College; M.A.. Columbia Univer- 
JUNE SINGLETARY, JR., 
EARl'*OTIS SKOGLEY !n En ° hleering *««»«*. B.S., North Carolina State College. 

FRE 7 D"I^CK r sTLE S ftL?iN; V - S ' ""* ***" S " <e ™"«- 

CHARGE? S^LLWOOd! JR?" *"* *"**" "^ N ° rth C » ro1 ™ State CoU ^ e - 

Urfi've'rX^ "^ ***""***• B -SSan.E., Case Institute of Technology; M.S.. Harvard 
WILLIAM WESLEY GARRY SMART. JR 

^u%.^T r ^Li%7^l^^ a S l &^ iM ' 1 "****> BS - C1 — co,. 

THOMAS BRYAN SMILEY. 

micKel^chesl^Si& , S?J 1 '' B - S " MS ' Universit> - o£ North Carolina - 

noT<^°MS r °Phn r l Cit,i, ^rr^ RS - C - E '' C " E - Carnegie Institute of Tech- 

To™/"* ' ° f GeneticS ' B - A " MA - University of Virginia: Ph.D.. University of Wis- 
CLYDE FURIMAN SMITH. 

^rSlJL n, S&!'^%^i^ f ^^L EHtomao ^ * s - us - utah state 

FRANK HOUSTON SMITH, university. 

ctZhna ^t e C Cou£ 0fe88OT ° f ^^ Indu * tr *- BS - Davidson College; M.S.. North 
GEORGE WATSON SMITH, 

C^lina'smf C^V V ° rt;i CaT0Una Agri ^ tural Extension Service, B.S., M.S., North 
J. C. SMITH, 

JAHES wTYLAND l 'L £ ITH neen '" ff ' B ' C - E " ***■■ N ° rth CaroHna State Allege. 
NORWOOD^rIh^TsMITh'^ '**"** BS " MS " L ° UJSiana State University. 
OLIVER MWm'e'smi?* *** **■ "^ D " ke *T- 

oi S G^rlI. T ° feMOr ° f MmmW Sci€ " Ce - Maj0r ' Infa «>try. U. S. Army, B.S., University 
WILLIAM EDWARD SMITH, 

wii155S'edw1'5dsm{th*"'' ■"""* ES " No " h Clro1 ""' St "« c °"««- 

Oh??sSTte uSSrii?y ^ Leban0n ^^ ^^ AM - Columbia University; Ph.D.. 
WILLIAM THOMAS SNYDER, 

iTna^X^^ffi^*"*""*"" BSM - E " <™~»* oi Tennessee; 
WILLIAM HENRY SONNER. 

J~£2f C^oHnT^ ^ Uea<l<m - B - S - North Carolina State College; M.Ed.. University 
JASON LOY SOX, 

MARVlVrLUTS5ER a SPECK CT - "^ "^ N ° rth Car ° Hna State ColIe * e - 

8 Ttf ^£S.5rpSif ^^u^jser o/ • 4n,ma ' '-^^ bs - ■*- uni — 



348 Faculty 

herbert e. speece, 

Associate Professor of Education and Mathematics, B.A., York College; M.A., Texas 

Christian University; M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina. 
WILLIAM EDDON SPLINTER, 

Research Associate Professor hi Agricultural Engineering, B.S., University of Nebras- 
ka: M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
DAVID GRIFFIN SPRUILL, 

Instructor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
HANS HEINRICH STADELMAIER, 

Research Professor, Department of Metallurgy, Diplom-Physikv